(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Breeder and Sportsman (1904)"

-V 



E0D7 1EOSD3E 3 

California Slate Library 



I A 



RARY. 



Accessions No. 128716 . teW JAN ' " 1905 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/bresports44u 



2 



©lu? $rcei>er mtl» sportsman 



f January 2, 1H4 



New Memphis Jockey Club. 

MONT GOMERY PARK, MEMPHIS, T ENN. 

tO-Ten Stakes to Close January 2, 1904-10 

For Spring Meeting, I904, and Tennessee Derby and Oaks for I905. 



STAKES FOR 1905. 

IHl TENNESSEE DEKIIY IIIK 1 l»0fl I .Mm* t iilue 

• lOOllO SlllSCHIHKll Til II V <i. 0. BEINRTT ,V UlJ VoT fOSlH 

of 19uJ ilwo-yearolds of 1901). *5uO0 added (Entrance free). For 
1905. A sweepstakes for three year olds (foals of 1902) tl.Vieaoh, 
•75 forfeit. or 115 If declared on or berore May 3, IKH; 130 if declared 
on or before January 2, MQt, All declarations void unless accom- 
panied by the money. $5000 added, of which tlOOO to second, t.Yjo 
to third, and fourth to save stake. Welgnts— (Jolts. 122 lbs.; geld- 
ings, 1 IU lbs ; fl lies, 117 lbs One mil* hoiI one-elglii h 

THE TENNESSEE OAKS KOK 100.%-For Allies (foals of 
1802). K» Imitted value «.iuoo. f2uu add»d. ( Entrance free). 
For 1905 A sweepstakes for 811i«s, three-year-olds ifoalsof 1902) 
llOOeaoh, |I0 forfeit, or III) If declared on or before May 2. 1901; $20 
If declared on or before January 2, I., -i All declarations void 
unless accompanied by tbe money. tiooo added, of which MOO to 
Beoond. 1200 to third, and fourth to save s ake. Weights, 117 lbs. 
One mile 

STAKES FOR 1904. 

THE It ISTON HOTEL ST VKES Estimated value 94200. 

Scusi'rihed to bT'-OaoTun's Hotel. For colts and geldings 
ifOBlsof 1902). $IOl»added. if lilenlranu ) For ISM A sweepstakes 
fjr two-year-olds, cdIh and gelding, tio to accompany nomina- 
tion, and |»J additional to start. * •■• aided, of which 1200 to 
second, and $100 to third, fourth to save starting money, four 
furlong*. 

THE AKDKI.LC STAKES— For Allies (foals of 1902) Ml- 
mated value 8;20c> flimo added ($10 entrance) For 1801. 
A sweepsiakes for two-year old Allies. (10 to accompany nomina- 
tion, and I.S0 additional to start IIOOO added, of which t-200 to sec- 
ond $100 to third, fourth to save starting money. Four furlongs. 

THE MEMi'Hls STAKES— For two-year-olds (foals of 1902). 
Estimated value atuiiu f2ouo added ($10 entrance) For 
1901 A sweepsiakes for two-year olds $10 to accompany nomi- 
nation, and *.*) additional to start, (woo added, of which tiU) to 
second and ll.V) to third, fourth lo save starting money 3 lbs be- 
low the s^ale. Penalty — A winner of a race of the value of (1000 
to the winner, 3 l|is. iselllng excepted). Allowances— Non-win 
ners of two races of the value of $300 each, or one of tbe value of 



$500 (selling raoe, purse and stake excepted) allowed 5 lbs.; maid- 
ens 10 lbs. Five furlongs. 

THE HOTEL <■ VVOSOSTAKEt— Esilmated value S'-iOOO. 

Suhsi.'kihkd to in- Hotel Gayoso. For foals of I'JOl (three- 
year-olds of 1901). (1000 added. ((10 entrance) For IMML A 
sweepstakes for th ee-year-olds (foals of 1901) $10 to accompany 
nomination. $50 additional to start The Club to add (1000, of 
which $20" to secnnu, and $100 to third, the fourih to save starling 
money. A winner or a three year old stake race, when carrying 
their weight [colls lit, geldings 119, Allies II7J.3 lbs penalty: of 
two or more, 5 lbs allowances — Ilea ten non-winners in J901 
allowed h lbs : it unplaced, 8 Ibi ; others nev> r having won a two 
or three-year-old stake race (celling stakes excepted), allowed 7 
lbs.: If such have never won a race of the value of (100 to the win- 
ner (selling stakes and purse races excepted ), allowed 12 lbs.; 
beaten maidens, 30 lbs. Allowances not cumulative. One mile 



scale or THIS RACE. 



— 2. = 



Those entitled to no allowance 132 119 117 

Winner with weight up of one 3 year-oid stake 135 122 130 

Winner with weight up of two 3 year-old stakes 127 121 132 

Beaten non-winners placed in 19o4 117 111 112 

BMMB non-wloners unplaced in 1901 Ill 111 109 

Non-wi oners of a 2 or 3 year-old stake (selling excepted) 1 15 112 110 

Non-winner- of a raceof ibe valueof $100 " " no 107 105 

Beaten maidens 103 99 87 

FOR THRZE- YEAR- OLDS AND UPWARD 

THE MONTGOMERY HANDICAP— Estimated value 
F«.v>ii<>. Silver cup or plate 'o winner. Handicap (3000 added. 
(Entrance free). For 1801 A handicap sweepstakes for three- 
year-olds and upward $50 each, half forfeit, or (10 if declared. 
$3000 adde '. of which $loo „ second, and $250 to third, the fourth 
to save slake. In addition to tbe stake tbe winner will receive a 
valuable silver cup or plate, donated by the Club. Weights to be 
announced before 9am, February 6th, and declarations to be 
made on or before February 30, 19(>1 All declarations void unless 
The winner of a race, after the 



races of any value (selling pnrse race excepted), 5 lbs penalty: such 
peualty Lot to exceed scale weight if handicapped at less; those 
weighted at scale or more than scale weight by the bandlcapper 
will not be subject to a peualiy. 'i he scale to be Western Jockey 
Club Scale. This race to be run tbe optniDg day. One mile and 
one-sixteenth . 

THE I'KAIiOOY HOTEL H AN DICA 1' Estimated value 

•:tuoo. SuiiscKiiiED to by Pkaiiody Hotel. Handicap. (1500 
added and $500 sliver cup or plate. (Entrance free). For 18i I 
A handicap BWt epstakes for three-year-olds and upward. $50 1 ach, 
half forfeit, or $10 if declared on or before April 5th. All declara- 
tions vo d unless accompanied by the money. (1500 added, of 
w hich $250 to second, and (150 to third, fourth to save stake. In 
audition COL R. B SNOWUEN will add a silver cup or plate, to 
i he value of HOD, lo go lo the winner Weights to be announced two 
days before the race Winners of a race after tbe announcements 
of weights (selling race excepted), to carry 5 lbs. penalty. One 
mile and one-elglu h . 

THE TENNESSEE BREWING CO STAKES— Estimated 
value »2500. Subscribed to by Tennessee Bkbwino Co. 
Selling stakes (1000 added. ( Entrance (10). For 1901. A selling 
sweepstake for three-year-olds and upward. $10 to accompany 
nomination and (50 additional lo start $1000 added, of which |2oo 
to second, and $100 to third four.b lo save starting money The 
winner to be sold at auction for $3.00 if for less: 3 lbs allowed foi 
each 1500 to $3000; then 1 lb. for each $100 less to $500. Starters and 
selling price to b3 n tnied tbrougb tbe entry-box by ihe usual time 
of closing for this day's racing, and those so named are liable for 
starting fee Seven furlong*. 

THE COTTON STEEPLECHASE STAKES — Steeplechase. 
Estimated value W2500 $1500 added (Entrance free) For 
1901. A steepleohase handicap sweepstakes for three-year-olds 
and upward $50 each, half forfeit, or $10 if declared on or before 
April 3d. All declarations void unless accompanied bv the money. 
$1500 added, of which $250 to second and $150 to third, the fourth to 
save stake Weights to be announced two days before the race. 
Penalty— Winner of steeplechase (selling excepted), after 
weights are announced, 5 lbs. Four or more horses of entirely 
different interest lo start, or the race may be declared off Start- 
ers to be named through the entry-box at usual time of cloning ihe 
day before the race, and those named are liable for starting feo 
About two miles 



accompanied by the money 

weights are announeed, of ihe valueof $500 to the winner, or two 
SPECIAL NOTICE— -.—No entry will be received for any of these stakes except upon this condition: That all disputes, claims aDd objections arising out of tbe 
raxing, or with respect to the interpretations of the conditionsof any race, shall be decided by a majority of the Executive Committee present, or those whom they 
may appoint, and their decisions upon all points shall be final. 

The Club al90 reserves the right to refuse the entries of any person, or the transfer of any entry, and without notice. 

THIS RACE COURSE (MONTGOMERY PARK) is, without a doubt, one of the best in America to winter and train the thoroughbred, furnishing first-class 
and most comfortable quarters for both man and horse. On this track the majority of tbe good two-j ear-olds of the West each seat on are developed. 
Kntry Blanks or any information on application will be promptly furnished by the Secretary. 

NEW MEMPHIS JOCKEY CLUB. Office, No. 2 Cotton Exchange Building, Memphis, Tenn. 

S. R. MONTGOMERY, President. M. N. MACFARLAN, Secretary. 



— 



LAST OF THE PALO ALTO FARM HORSES 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., 



tio'U a: 

ll 01A\t .'; A 
: I 

1732 Market Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Will sell THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 14, 1904, at 8 o'clock, 

the following consignment from the celebrated Halo Alto Stock Farm, absolutely the last of tbe 

hones on this great farm, all by great sires and from great mares: 

COIviK AND SEX. FOALKD. SIKE. DAM. 

liay Ally May 20, 1903 . .Nutwood Wilkes 2: lev,.. Cressida 2:lf>^ bv Palo Alto 

Black colt May 17, 1903. McKlnney 2:1 IX A vena 219>,4 by Palo Alto 

Bay colt April 23. IDoi . MootulU t:1S% Maiden 2:23 by Electioneer 

Black Ally. April 211. 1903 McKlnney 2: 1 1* Elden 2: 19'i by Nephew 

Chestnut colt April 18. 190 i. .Nutwood Wilkes 2:16'4. . Paleta 2:16 bv Palo Alto 

Bay filly April 8, 19 II .. tfutwood Wilkes 2:18", . Novelist ?:27 by Norval 

Bay Ally April 7. 1903 . .Nutwood Wilkes 2:1(5* . Ltska8:l»i by Electioneer 

Bay Hlly Mar 31, 1903 ..McKioney 2:1 1!< Luoyneer 2:27 by Electioneer 

Black Ally Mar 21,1903 . MoKlnney 2:1 IX Aerolite by Palo Alto 

liayfllly Mar. 20. 1903. .Nutwood Wilkes 2:16'4 . Adbuta by Advertiser 

Black colt Mar 20, i;«>3 . McKlnney 2: 1 1 14 Sweet Ro<e ( I ) 8:2fii< bv Electioneer 

Brown colt Mar 13. 1903. . Nazote 2:88* Gertrude Russell 2:23' B "by Electioneer 

Bay oolt.. .. Mar 9, 19 13. . Mendocino 2: 19^ Marv Osborne (3) 2:28;-, by Azmoor 

Bay ttllj Mar. 3. 1903 . Monbells 2:23* Wlldflciwer (2) 2:21 bv Electioneer 

Bay Blly Feby. 15, 1903.. Nutwood Wilkes 8:16* ...Expressive (3, 2:I2>4 bv Electioneer 

Hay oolt Feby U. KKI3 Monbells 2:23* Manzanlia (4) 2:18 by Electioneer 

Brown Ally Jan. 24 11103 Mendocino 2: 19^ Lulu Wilkes by Geo. Wilkes 

Bay oolt May 2, 1902 . Iran Alto 2:12^ Aria (3i 2:16^ by Bernal 

Brown colt April II, I9O0 McKlnney 2:11^ Helena ScUU bv Electioneer 

Bay mare April 20, 19 10 . Dexter Prlnoe Lady Ag.iea bv 'Electioneer 

Marlon 8:2«i<. b m April 17. IXK3 Piedmont 2:17* I.adv Morgan by Hambletonian 10 

Sonoma 2:2H Mar. 19, 18X3 Electioneer Sonlag Mohawk by Mobawk Chief 

Hones will be at yard .laouary 1 1th for Inspection. Send for Catalogues 

11:111 H. CHASE * CO., 1733 Market St., 8. F. 

At the same time and at the same place there will also be sold the stallion Daedalion 2:11 by 
Diablo 2:19*, dam Grace, dam of two in 2: IS three in 2:20 bv Buccaneer. Daedalion is one of the most 

gromislog young sires !n California, and is able to race and reduce his record. Consigned by Geo 
L Fox, Clements, Cal. 

To close a copartnership. Mr. C. A. Durfee sends tbe following four by McKlnney 2:1 1*: Johnny 
McHenzle. two year old gelding, dam Babe by Ferdinand 1815. son of Strathmore. second dam Fire- 
wood by Fayette Wilkes, son of Geo. Wilkes, third dam by Blackwocd 74 and fourth dam by Wash- 
ing! n Denmark. This colt Is a great prospect and Is entered and paid upon In all the leading three 
year old slakes In California. Twilight and Daisy B;. roll sisters Bve and four years old by McKlnney 
out of Stem* I Oder, dam .if the great Directum 2:05* These should be tbe greatest broodmares ever 
bri-d In California. Bessie D.. a ally by McKlnney out of a mare by a son of Venture. She is 
bred much like the other two and a great prospect. 

Geo. A. Davis of Pleasanton consigns the following: Directory, blk g . 1801. bv Rev Direct, dam 
Mamie H. by Alexander's Bay Allen: Rey Vera, blk.f. 1901. by Rev Dlrect-Aoteera bv Anteeo; 
i^."" 11 ' £' k • "J* by Charles Derby-May (dam of Biy Rum 8:25*1 bv Anteeo: Cnarlottlne. blk f . 
1902. by Charles Derby, dam Miss Dlreot by Direct; Mamie Rey, blk f., 1902, bv Rey Direct dam 
Mamie H. by Alexander s Bay Allen. 

Consigned by A Berner, Redwood City: Year.lngcolt by Mendocino. dam Carmine bv Electrlcllv. 

Consigned by C Harliog. Nevada: Bay pacer by Falrose dam Mischief, dam of Primrose 2:09«. 
One of tbe grandest aod hm roadsters lo California 

Conslgnexl by I L Borden. San Francisco: Ch. b N L B (2i 2 21* bv Diablo, dam by Washlng- 
ton2.rU? 1 his pioer worked a mile last year In 2:12*. He is one of Ue best road horses in Cali- 
forn a and c:in be driven by a lady 



FRED B. CHASE & CO. 1732 Market St. 



FOR SALE 



SAM FULLEN Thoroughbred 

dam Lilly Bobblt by Victory 8AM FULLEN is a high-class stallionT 
first-class condition. For price and furiher partieulars address 



By Imp Cavalier, dam Lena 
Oliver, hy King Lear: second 
Winner of four stakes. In 



A. FORBES, 



Or BREEDER AND SPORTSM \ H 



5615 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, Cal, 



HARN 

HIGH-CLASS 
FINISH AND 
WORKMANSHIP 
AT 

MODERATE 
PRICES. 

THE 

BIG STOliE 



JEPSEN 



and SADDLES 




.(INC.) 

1145-47 Market St. San Francisco 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-flve years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR-the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies— tbe LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern Improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 




AwardedUold M 
At Call forul a 
Fair 1898. 

Every horseowr 
valueshisstock 
constantly hav> 
ply of It on hi; 
improves and !. 
stock In the pic 
condition. 



dal 

tate 

who 
ilu 

^un- 
it 
eps 

i of 



RED BALL BRAND 



Manhattan Fo. : Co. 

1 253 Folaom St., San Fi , ,, 

ask your grocers or dealers far ,i. 



Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion 

C. P. KERTELL, Hanger 



January 2, 1904] 



8 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OITICB — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
TEtJtPHONB: Black 686. 



Term*— One Tear 83. Six Month* VI. 76, Three Month* SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kkllxy, 38 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 2, 1004. 



THE FINAL SALE of Palo Alto Stock Farm 
horses will be held in this city on Thursday 
evening, January 14th. How many realize what this 
means? The final sale--the last of the Palo Alto 
Farm horses. The great farm, once the pride of 
every Californian, will breed trotters no more. The 
great industry founded by Governor Stanford is to 
pass absolutely and the pastures and paddocks and 
stables devoted to other uses. The farm that was 
the principal agent in making California one of ti e 
greatest trotting hor6e breeding localities in the 
world \i to send its final consignment to the salesriDg. 
There are but twentj-two head, of these eighteen 
are yearlings, foals of 1903. They are the last crop; 
their sires and dams have been solr 1 and are scattered 
all over the United States and some even are in 
Europe. These yearlings represent the very acrre 
of Palo Alto breeding on the plan established by the 
lamented founder of the farm. With one or two ex- 
ceptions thedams of theseyearlings were bred at Palo 
Alto, and in 1902, when the last matings were made, 
Superintendent Covey selected as stallions to mate 
them with two of the greatest sires California has 
ever seen — McKinney and Nutwood Wilkes. Avena 
2:19$ by Palo Alto, Elden 2:19$ by Nephew, Lucyneer 
by Electioneer, Aerolite by Palo Alto, Sweet Rose 
2:26 J as a yearling by Electioneer, and the great race 
mare Helena 2:1 1 J by Electioneer were all bred to Mc- 
Kinney and their foals are in this sale. The Mc- 
Kinneys are deservedly popular. They have proven 
themselves race horses. McKinney is the only stal- 
lion in the Jvorld that has sired five 2:10 trotters, and 
yet every one of the five got his or her record in an 
actual race. Why should not these foals by this 
great horse out of as good mares as Palo Alto ever 
owned be worth something more than an average 
auction price? They will double in value for the next 
two years to a certainty. Cressida 2:18} by Palo'Aftby 
Palita 2:16 by the same horse, Novelist 2:27 by Norval, 
Liska 2:16} by Electioneer, Adbuta by Advertiser, 
and the great three-year-old race mare Expressive 
2:12$ were bred to Nutwood Wilkes 2:16$, the sire of 
the second fastest trotting stallion in the world, John 
A. McKerron 2:04$, and their foals will be sold at the 
sale of January 14th. Is not this the breeding that 
should be sought after? Will they not be worth more 
than they will bring? We answer an emphatic yes 
to both questions. Then there is a bay colt by Mon- 
bells out of Maiden 2:23 by Electioneer. This is royal 

breeding — two crosses of Electioneer and one of 
■ 

Beautiful Bells. A brown colt by Nazote (brother to 
Azote 2:04}) out of Gertrude Russell, own tister to 
Palo Alto 2:08} represents the very highest point of 
trotting horse breeding up to date. A bay colt by 
Monbells out of Manzaoita 2:16 by Electioneer is 
another royally bred one. the brown filly by the great 
aire Mendocino out of Lulu Wilkes, dam of Advertiser 
is like him, and a bay two-year-old by Iran Alto 2:12}, 
Palo Alto's greatest son, is out of Aria that took a 
three-year-old record of 2:16} and is by Bernal 2:17. 
He should be a race horse and a sire. There are a 
couple of three-year-olds in the sale — one a brown colt 
by McKinney out of Helena 2:11}, and the other a 
filly by Dexter Prince out of Lady Agnes by Elec- 
tioneer. Two broodmares with records, one by Pied- 
mont, the other by Electioneer, complete the list. 
The list of those to be sold will be found in our ad- 
vertising columns, giving age, sex and pedigree, but 
we ad vise every reader to send to Fred H. Chase <fc 
Co., 1732 Market Btreet, San Francisco, for a cata- 
logue. This well known firm will conduct the sale, 
and the horses will be at the yard Monday January 
11th, for inspection. 



OF THE STATE FAIRS held this side the Missis- 
sippi river during the year just passed none was 
■o successful financially or caused more favorable 
comment than the Oregon State Fair held at Salem, 



that State. The secretary 's report for the year ending 
December 1, 1903, has recently been published in the 
Xorth Pacific Rural Spirit, and shows that the net 
profits on the fair was $4128.45. Among the receipts 
were $10,000 appropriation from the State, $10,134 
gate receipts and $7558 from entrance money. The 
sum of $10,384.45, or just $384 45 more than the State 
appropriation was paid out in p .'emiums for live stock 
and other exhibits, and $12,490 for purses. In the 
report of the secretary this statement is made: "The 
two large early closing stakes of $2000 each were a 
great success, one bringing in $2100 in entrance fees, 
the other $2065. Besides this they brought together 
the best class of horses on the Pacific Coast, which 
attracted a large number of people, swelling our gale 
receipts, on the two days on which they were raced, 
to considerable more than one-half of the entire re- 
ceipts " It is very evident from the report of Secre- 
tary Wisdom that the Oregon State Fair has been 
conducted in a business-like manner under the man- 
agement of 1903. It was run as a fair and race meet- 
ing and notasa bookmaker's carnival, with the result 
that the public turned out to see the racing and made 
the fair a profitable one financially and otherwise. 
It might bo well for the managers of California fairs 
that havefailed to pay a profit in recent years to take 
a few pointers from this successful Oregon fair. Its 
racing program only lasted six days, and no book- 
making was permitted. There were never less than 
two and sometimes three good harness races each Jay 
and "the f air had the cordial suppo t of the farmer 
aod the business men alike," to use the secretary 's 
language. There is no reason why California fai rs 
cannot do as well as the Oregon ones, if the managers 
will get rid of the idea that they cannot afford to 
refuse the big bids made by the bookmakers. If they 
will but carefully look over their accounts they will 
see that every dollar of money received from the 
bookies is paid back for free purses for the running 
horses. There is much food for study and reflection 
in the reportof the Oregon State Fair of 1903. 



RACING ON THE ICE is one of the enjoyments 
of the winter season that Californiaus can never 
enjoy unless they should send their horses to the tops 
of the Sierra Nevada mountains and arrange for 
racing on some of the lakes that lie at an altitude of 
from 7000 to 9000 feet above sea level, and are frozen 
over for a few weeks during December and Januarj. 
Canada is the home of ice racing. An Eastern ex- 
change says that on January 6, at Peterborough, the 
campaigners on the circuit of Canadian ice tracks will 
open the winter season. From Peterborough the 
trotters go to Port Perry, Kingston, Belleville and 
Napanee, finally rounding up at the real centre of 
the sport, Ottawa. At the capital the season of ice 
racing is one of great brilliancy. The races are 
patronized by Lord and Lady Minto and the society 
people who may be wintering in the picturesque city. 
A royal good time is always the result. A track for 
use this year is- already being staked out on the 
Ottawa river in view of the Parliament buildings. It 
is ten minutes' drive from the centre of Ottawa. The 
most important meet of the season is that of the 
Central Canada Racing Association, which occurs 
from January 23 to 30, inclusive. There are two $1000 
purses for stake events, for trotters in the 2:40 clasp, 
and also for pacers of the same speed. The races are 
conducted in accordance with the rules of theNational 
Trotting Association, and paid judges are employed 

ALEXANDER McCORD'S DEATH, which oc- 
curred in this city two weeks ago, removed from 
our midst one of the most popular pioDeer liverymen 
of California. At the time of his death he was pro- 
prietor of the Fashion Stables on Ellis street, which 
he had conducted for the past twenty-five years, and 
which is one of the leading stables of San Francisco. 
The cause of Mr. McCord 's death was heart disease, 
he having suffered with that ailment for sometime, 
and had been confined to his home for six weeks be- 
fore death ended his suffering. Alex McCord was 
one of those genial, whole souled mon who made 
friends and kept them. He had been in business here 
in San Franeieeo for forty years, was a regular road 
driver and owned and drove many good horses. He 
was a man of splendid physique and tremendous 
strength and conspicuous in any gathering of horse, 
men. 

THE DIRECTORS of the Pacific Coast Trotting 
Horse Breeders Association will - meet at the 
Secretary's office, 36 Geary street, in this city, 
Thursday, Jannary 7th, to urrange and announce 
stakes and purses for the big meeting the association 
will give this year. The Directors extend an invita- 
tion to the managers of all California traoks where 
harness racing is held, and the representatives of any 
or all the Agricultural Districts to meet with them 
and arrange for a harness racing circuit for 1904. 



"TOM SMITH, one of the veterans of California 
* trotting horse breeders and trainers, intends re- 
tiring from the horse breeding business and offers all 
his horses for sale. Mr. Smith has never been an ex 
tensive breeder, compared to some of the owners of 
stock farms in California, but he has certainly been a 
successful one, as the records made by horses of his 
breeding will prove. He bred Tom Smith 2:13}, 
Columbus S. 2:17, Stella 2:15$, Little Mao 2:17$, Dolli- 
can 2:15$, George Washington 2:16} and several other 
trotters with records, and the writer does not recall 
one pacer bred by him, although he may have bred a 
few. Mr. Smith used the stallions Mambrino Chief, 
Jr., McDonald Chief and George Washington and all 
their get with scarcely an exception were ) a 1 ge, hand- 
some square trotters and elegant roadsters. Among 
those he now offers for sale is the great brood mare 
Daisy S. that is the dam of Tom Smith 2:13$, Little 
Mac 2:27$. Sweet Rosie 2:28}, etc. Mr. Smith's horses 
are at Vallejo and can be seen at any time. Read bis 
advertisement in this issue. 



SPORTING BALLADS, a neatly bound volume 
containing the poems from the pen of R. L. Cary, 
Jr. (Hyder All) has been received at this ollice, for 
which the author has our thanks. The volume is 
handsomely illustrated and there is a neat introduc- 
tion by Hugh Edmurd Keough, the well known turf 
writer. R. L. Cary has many friends on this Coast 
who have read with pleasure his racing ballads pub- 
lished in the Eastern papers during the past few years 
and which have now been collected in book form, 
which should be in every sportsman's library. 



Horse Sale at Portland. 

On another page of this issue will be found the ad 
of J. L. McCarthy & Son, announcing their Second 
Spring Combination Horse Sale (at auction), to take 
place at the Irvington race track, Portland, Ore., 
March 1, 2 and 3, 1904. Their sale of last spring demon- 
strated that they do not depend upon Portland alone 
for buyers, as there were horsemen present from 
every section of the Pacific Northwest, Montana, 
Idaho and British Columbia. The North Pacific Fair 
Association Circuit has grown rapidly within the past 
few years and the money now hung up by racing asso- 
ciations in that section compares favorably with any 
other circuit. Horses from California won over" 1o 
per cent of the money given away on that circuit last 
fall and Northwestern horsemen are beginning to 
realize that they must have the best in order to hold 
their own. As a consequence Messrs. McCarthy & 
Son aredaily receiving anxious inquiries as Vo w%ether 
there will be any California horses entered in their 
sale, which would make it seem as though it were a 
good opportunity to sell some well bred horses for the 
high dollar. Times in the Northwest are good and 
the demand for good horses of all classes will be very 
strong next spring. Many California horses won 
fame and money in the Northwest last fall and if taken 
back to the land of their triumph would undoubtedly 
briDg every dollar they are worth. The sale last 
spring was a great success and McCarthy & Son are 
going to spare no pains to make their coming sale 
even more successful. If you have a good horse to 
sell write them for full particulars and entry blanks. 



Hay is high at the present time Ninety-two and a 
half c«nts is the average price per hundred pounds 
that the San Francisco houses bid for the Govern- 
mec t shipments to the Philippine Islands. The price 
a ton will be from $17.80 to $19. Seattle's offar was 
from $1.27$ to $140 per hundred pounds. The 5000 
tons will probably be accepted from San Francisco. 
Government hay has not been purchased here lor 
some time, the reason being that the San Francisco 
bale has been too large to find favor with the men 
who have to convey it about the islands. If this city 
is awarded the contracts, the firms hero say they will 
have to recompress the hay to the Government regu- 
lation bale of four feet. This fact is offered in ex 
planation of theexecs* upon the current market price 
of $16. Fifty cents is for hauling, $2.50 for compress- 
ing, and 50 cents for waste. 



They make automobiles handsomor and faster and 
cheaper and less odoriferous and bigger, yet the horso 
turns up at his annual show in greater numbers and 
finer shape than ever. And more and more people go 
to see him, too. The doctors of evolution do not put 
the horse very close to the human creature in the 
matter of descent, but, compared to any possible 
motor car combination of metal and gasolene, man 
will over look upon the horse as a brother. It Is all 
well enough to say that sentiment counts for nothing 
in the days of dollars and c« nts, but it docs. and you'll 
never take from the horse tho lore and admiration 
man has given him from the beginning by anything 
whose solo cause for its existence is Its speed, its ex- 
penslveness and its novelty. — Wider and Driver. 

New Surrey, firstclass, with polo and shafts, canopy 
top, 1} inch rubber tire, turn under, elegantly 
trimmed. Original price $420, can be bought at 
Kenney Manufacturing Company, 531 Market street, 
San Franolsco, for $225. New lot of McMurray carts 
juat arrived — 1904 models. * 



128716 



4 



[January 2, 1W4 



Christmas Matinee at Los Angeles. 

[Los Angeles Times.] 

Thousands of people attended the matinee of the 
Los Angeles Driving Club on Christmas Day. 

The afternoon's racing opened with a four-horse 
trot billed for the 2:50 class, youngsters competing, 
and J. H. Snowden's bay gelding Rondow, driven by 
himself, won in straight heats without difficulty. 
Godfrey Fritz appeared behind a brown gelding, Gen. 
Boodle by name, which did himself proud by finishing 
second in his first appearance on a matinee track. 
William Garland and M. B. Mosher had young 
animals entered, and the time was good for the 
class— 2:344 and 2:31 for both heats. 

A 2:25. pace, second on the bill, went to W. L. . 
Heller's brown mare Electra, a performer of much 
promise, who succeeded in doing the two miles 
aroudd 2:20 and the last one faster than the first. E. 
J. Delorey and P. L. Budinger made bids, but were 
not there with the steadiness. 

The third event, a free-for-all, was quite a "hoss 
race." The best "hoss" in it was Briney K , Owner 
Berry driving, and Briney won in straight heats with 
clockwork regularity of stride, beating his former 
driver, Bob Smith, with Harry Hurst, and C. A. 
Canfield, driving Athaio. Outfooting :i pacer with a 
trotter did Berry more good than winning the race, 
though the time was firat class, 2:17} and 2:16$. 

Ano' her race of high interest was the fourth, for 
pacers, 2:20 Iclass. B. J. Delorey with a very promis- 
ing bay gelding in Victor Platte; Claude Black, plus 
Berry's variegated cap, with a brass screen for a 
dashboard which was familiarly dubbed the "wind 
shield, "and aitting behind J. W. Spooner's Wood B.; 
M. B. Mosher with Scappoose, her head propped out 
at right angles to her neck to stop pulling, and Billy 
K., owner H. V. Cocke driving, were the contestants. 
Delorey and Mosher looked so much alike the crowd 
could not tell them apart, but it made no difference 
because in the first heat they were running a little 
race to themselves several hundred yards to the rear 
of Black and Cocke, who made a very handsome heat 
Of it. Black had the rail and a length lead; it proved 
to be more than Cocke could make up, though his 
gelding responded gamely to the demand in the 
stretch. The initial heat was the fastest of the day, 
time being 2:15$. The two first were almost within 
whip reach all around, and the deciding trip around 
the oval was practically the same, though a little 
slower. 

To wind up the day a 2:30 class mixed event was 
put on, and two starters came out in it. Dr. C. W. 
Bryson appeared behind George B.,and Dr. Ralph 
Hagan sat behind Zombretta, a very handy, brown 
filly belonging to L. J. Christopher, which showed 
yesterday that she will be heard from in the future at 
all the matinee events. The first heat was a nip-and- 
tuck session all the way around, Hagan having the 
pole. He won in a drive through the stretch, but not 
until Bryson had spoken for the heat in forceful 
fashion. The time was 2:30*. 

The final and deciding heat attracted much atten- 
tion on account of the close finish in the first and it 
was freely predicted that there would be a three heat 
race. The prophets were within a hair's breadth oi 
being right. Coming around within a short toss of 
each other, Bryson kept George B. back until well 
into the stretch and then went out around Hagan for 
the honors, and had the wire been ten yards farther 
he would have iaken the heat. Dr. Hagan did not ' 
make his move until the drawgate was passed and 
George «aa going five feet to Zombretta's four at the 
finish only a short head behind. The first beat was 
donein 2:31ft thesecond was for blood and 2:22 was 
hung out, Zombretta making the last half in 1:09 — 
fast enough for a youngster. The summary: 

First race 2:50 trot: 

Roodow, h. g (J. H Snowden) I 1 

General Boodle, tit, g (Godfrey Fritz) 2 8 

Black Arrow, blk g... (William Garland) 3 3 

Dan, ch g (M.B. Mosher) 4 4 

Tlme-2:34V4, 2:31. 

Second race, 2:25 pace: 

Electra. br. m ! (W. L. Heller) 1 l 

Glen, ob g (P. L. Budinger) 3 2 

EI Mont, b g ...(E. J. Delorey) a 3 

San Gabriel Prince, b g (P. B. Michel) 4 4 

| , . . | Time-2:22, 2:19!*. 

, Third race, free-for-all: 

BrlneyK.bg (W. H. Berry) 1 1 

Athaio br. g (C. A. Canfield) » 3 

Harry Hurst, I. g (Robert Smith) 3 2 

Time— 2:1?^, 2:184. 

Fourth race, 2:20 pace: 

Wood B., oh. g , J. W. Spooner (C. D. Black) 1 l 

BillyK.b.g (R V.Cooke) 1 2 

Victor Platte, b. g (E. J. Delorey) 3 3 

Scappoose, b. m (M. B. Mosher) 4 4 

Ttme-»:15X, 2:17. 
Fifto race. 2:30 mixed: 

- Zombretta.br m (Dr. Hagan) I 1 

George B., b. g (C. W. Bryaon) 2 2 

Time-2:30M. 2:32. 



Cured Spavin with One-Half Bottle. 



Gas City, Ind., Oct. 20, 1902. 
The Lawrence Williams Co., Cleveland. O.: 

About four years ago I troughta bottle of your Gombault's 
Caustic Balsam, and used it on a spavin with great tuccess. I 
■till have more than half of it, and it appears to be all right 

JAS. HOLBROOK 



How the Army Horses Are Cared For. 

The problem of getting a maximum amount of work 
on a minimum amount of feed from horses and mules 
used in military service has been satisfactorily solved 
in the United States Army, the kind, quality and 
amount of forage being the same for every horse, that 
for mules being slightly less in quantity than for 
horses. 

The daily ration of forage for a horse is 12 pounds 
of oats, barley or corn, that of hay 14 pounds; for 
mules the grain ration is 8 and the hay ration 12 
pounds, the allowance of straw for bedding being 100 
pounds per month per animal, or in lieu of straw an 
equal amount of hay is allowed for the purpose. 
Many years of experimental feeding were necessary 
before the authorities were satisfied that the amount 
was sufficient, but a casual glance at the mounts of an 
organization will bear out the statement that the 
results attained have been all that can be desired, as 
the horses and mules are usually fat, smooth, ard 
have an appearance of being satisfied. 

Captains of troops and batteries as a rule work on 
the theory: "If I look out for my horses my men are 
intelligent enough to look out for themselves," and it 
is a well-known fact, in the service at leaet, that or- 
ganizations so governed are the best. This does not 
by any means imply that the captain does not enter- 
tain a fatherly regard for his men, for he usually 
does; but his interest in his mounts, from a military 
point of view, begins at reveille and never ends. 

Unlike the feeding of most horses, army horses are 
fed but twice a day, the morning feeding taking 
place at reveille, under the immediate supervision of 
the stable sergeant; the evening forage being given 
after the horses are groomed and watered at after- 
noon stables, and under the supervision of the troop 
or battery commander; the morning feed of grain 
being slightly in excess of that fed at night, because 
hay is generally fed at night only. Of course, when 
troops are on the march the evening is the only time 
when the feeding of hay is possible. 

The statement aa to the daily ration must not be 
accepted too literally, as some animals require more 
than other?, and, as all are under scrutiny at all times, 
both by commanders and stable sergeants, it soon de- 
termines how much each individual animal requires, 
and after this has been determined, due regard is paid 
to such requirements. 

The specifications of contracts for furnishing forage 
for the army are most exact in their nature, and un- 
less the grain and hay fully meet the requirements 
cilledforln the contracts it is not accepted, as the 
contractor of experience knows that to try to hood- 
wink the army in the matter of qualities called for is 
a proposition not to be demonstrated, because of the 
vigilance of all through whose hands it is required to 
pass, and that they do not hesitate to express them- 
selves when there is just cause (from the trooper who 
does the feeding to the quartermaster-general of the 
army); thus the forage furnished it, as a rule, is the 
very best obtainable. 

Oats furnish the bulk of the grain used, corn being 
rarely if ever UBed, except in latitudes exceeding 
forty-two degrees north, as it is a known fact toevery 
horseman that corn burns out, and destroys a horse's 
digestive apparatus more quickly than any other 
kind of grain. Bran mash, well salted, is fed once or 
twice weekly, and serves as a relish to the horse's bill 
of fare. 

In the garrison horses are always watered thrice 
daily — morning, noon and evening — and most modern 
military stables have in connection a commodious 
corral, in which water is placed, so that it is at all 
times accessible to horses turned loose therein. 

On the march horses are watered wherever possible, 
large quantities never being given while actually on 
the march, but after making camp, and the horses 
are thoroughly cooled and rubbed. They are allowed 
to have their fill morning and night. 

Overland marches in the western arid lands are so 
conducted as to bring the line of march through such 
territory as is well known to have an abundance cf 
water, and no more grievous thing can befall an or 
ganization than to find itself in a country where there 
is not an abundance, and amongst military men such 
a place is avoided as is a pestilence. 

Horses are grazed whenever possible. In the 
spring, after the grass has become abundant, horses 
are not worked very hard, and are allowed to graze 
daily, great care being taken not to allow them to 
get too much at the start, so as to cause any dele- 
terious effects, the grazing period being increased 
daily until they can be safely kept out four hours, 
this being gr nerally the maximum time for grazing; 
and this usually takes place in the afternoon, as the 
forenoon is usually occupied by drills and so forth. 
When on the march reveille usually takes place at a 
very early hour, and in countries where grazing is 
possible, horses are allowed to graze for an hour or 



so before starting on the march for the day, as the 
dew is still on the grass, and it is much more palata- 
ble to the animal than after the sun has dried and 
withered it. 

Feed boxes are washed once a week with a vinegar 
solution to keep thorn sweet, clean and wholesome, 
it having been found that vinegar is a good deodor- 
ant and one for which our particular. friend, the horse, 
has no repugnance. 

Hay is always well shaken before feeding, and oats 
are usually received in an almost dustless condition, 
so that the cases of bad-winded horses in the army 
are comparatively few, partly, of course, owing to 
this attention being paid to the forage before feed- 
ing. 

It is remarkable to note the amount of work to le 
got from horses and mules on this comparatively 
small amount of forage. Of course, in the garrison 
the working hours for the horse are comparatively 
few, but during the time he is being used there are 
constantly occurring trials that tax his metal loathe 
limit. The mule on the othor hand, does "his eight 
hours daily at the real work at the po6t — and scrxe of 
it is very hard work, too; still the amount of forage 
for actual field service is identical with that for the 
garrison, and when the full amounts are obtainable 
no lack of quantity is ever reported, no matter how 
arduous the campaign. 

The use of alfalfa for army mounts is as yet in its 
infancy, but where it has been used reports as to its 
use and benefit have been generally favorable. 

A Very Successful Breeder. 

Mr. M. A. Murphy, of the Tesla Coal Company, is 
one of the most successful breeders in California con- 
sidering the number of mares he has used. Four 
years ago he bred five mares to Zombro 2:11, and got 
five colts. One of the colts with six weeks' work 
trotted a mile in 2:23; another with two months' work 
paced a mile in 2:25, and the other three colts have 
each trotted miles in 2:20 or better. One of them is 
Zombretta, a filly that won a matinee race at Los An- 
geles on Christmas Day, trotting her heats in 2:30$ 
and 2:22. Zombretta has only been up a month, but 
she acted like a veteran and in the last heat of her 
race, after going to the half in 1 :13J, came home in 
1 :08A, the last quarter in 33 seconds. Sbe was trained 
last spring and worked a mile in 2:20 before being 
turned out, the last half of which was in 1:09. Prob- 
ably no breeder on this Coast or elsewhere eVer bred 
five mares to one horse the same season and got five 
such colts. Three of them are confidently expected 
to trot In 2:!5 this year. Geo. Beckers will make a 
short season at Los Angeles as usual with Zombro 
and about May 1st will ship the great horse to Cleve- 
land and place him in th(> stud there until September 
1st. Any person having a good Zombro colt which 
they desire to sell can ship the same in Mr. Becker's 
car to Cleveland and sell at either the Blue Ribbon 
sale or at private sale. Zombro is not for sale, but 
will doubtless be kept in Ohio or Kentucky by Mr. 
Beckers, who is firm in the faith that he owns the 
greatest coming sire in the world, and ho wants him 
to have the very choicest mares from now on. 



Rey McGregor Sold for $1200. 

A notable sale was made at Pleasanton last week. 
Al McDonald, who purchased at the Sanders sale in 
this city a few weeki ago the yearling colt Rey Mc- 
Gregor for Mr. W. J. Simpson of San Francisco for 
$445, sold him again to Mr. F. Gommet for $1200, acd 
that is a low prke for him, as he is one of the m06t 
promising young trotters in the country. Al says he 
is the best one he ever handled and he broke acd 
trained Who Is It 2:10}, What Is It 2:16}, Zambra 
2:16} and marked Forest W. 2:14} and Iloilo 2:15. He 
says it makes a fellow feel good to buy and sell a colt 
at a good profit. By the way, McDonald is getting 
to be quite a horse trader. Last year he bought 
Forest VV. for $250 and sold him for $1500 after win- 
ning $1900 for him. This year he bought Iloilo for 
$500 and sold him for $1500 after winning a thousand 
with him. The breeding of the colt Rey McGregor is 
as follows: Sire Rey Direct 2:10, son of Direct 2:05A 
and Vera 2:221, dam of three in the list by Kentucky 
Volunteer. The dam of Rey McGregor is Lurline, 
sister to W.W. Foote 2:15} and Algregor 2:11, by 
Steinway, second dam Maggie McGregor, dam of two 
In the list by Robert McGregor, third dam Maggie 
Davis, dam of one in 2:30. 



Calistoga. Cal., Sept. 11, 1902. 
Dr. S. A. Tuttle— Dear Sir: By mere accident I came in posses- 
sion of a bottle of your Family Elixir, and tried It on a spi ained 
ankle of a horse in my charge with the very best results, so much 
so that I am anxious to adopt it in my veterinary practice, which 
is quite extensive and of forty years' duration. Will you please 
make me your bast terms! 1 Would take an agency for the sale of 
the remedy In Napa county. I thought I was In possession of 
some finer remedies than any one in the business, but when I gave 
your Elixir a trial found I was mistaken, and believe in giving 
honor to whom honor is due. Please let me hear from you at your 
earliest convenience, and < bilge. Yours truly, 

Da. L WIXOM. 



Janda«v 2, 1904] 



5 



Notes and News 



January 1 f.b, the final Palo Alto sale. 



Sidney Dillon's fee will be $100 for the season of 1004. 

McKinney 2:11 \ has twenty-seven performers with 
records from 2:15 to 2:02. 



About 175 horses are now being worked at Agricul- 
tural Park, Los Angeles. 



Ed Geers now has twenty head of horses in his 
stable at Memphis, Teon. 



There is a rumor in the east that the pacer Agitato 
2:09 was out on a ringing tour in 1003. 



Seattle will most likely claim the dates of June 15th 
to August 15th for the running meeting this year. 



Alta McDonald thinks he can lower the ice record 
with Dariel 2:00}, and will have a tilt with Father 
Time in February. 

A full brother to Primrose 2:00$ is to be sold at the 
Chase sale January 14th. He is a grand looking 
roadster and fast. 

Colt stakes are getting popular all over the country, 
and this is the best evidence that harness horses are 
thought more of than ever. 

Alcantara has thirty-one representatives in the 2:15 
list, while his daughterj have produced seventeen 
with records of 2:15 or better. 



Vermont, the home of the Morgans, got its first 
world 's champion harness horse this year in Dariel 
2:00}, the fastest pacing mare. 



Mr. Bernard of Colorado Springs has sent his mare 
Dora Delpha 2:09 to the Village farm near Buffalo, 
New York, to be bred to Direct Hal 2:04J. 



Archie Galbraith of Spokane is shipping out from 
the East two carloads of draft stallions for the spriDg 
trade, consisting of Clydes, Percherons and Suffolks. 



Pilot Medium now has one hundred and twenty- 
one representatives in the standard list. Nearly a 
hundred more than any other son of Happy Medium. 

Don.'t fail to attend the final sale of the Palo Alto 
horses. Those yearlings will be worth twice tbe 
money next year that will be paid for them at this 
sale. 

Four thousand people attended the matinee of the 
Los Angeles Driving Clubon Christmas Day, although 
there was a special program of splendid running races 
at the new Ascot Park. 



Three young Rey Directs and two Chas. Derbys are 
to be sold by Geo. A. Davis of Pleasanton at Fred H. 
Chase & Co.'s salesyard, Thursday eveniDg, January 
14th. These are choice goods. 



William G. Layng will sell Tuesday, Jan. 5th, 
seventy head of well broken horses weighing from 
1900 to 1800 pounds. A few of the heavy mares a. e 
in foal to an imported Shire horse. 



One of the melancholy failures of the year was the 
attempt to turn Anaconda 2:01 f into a traveling ad- 
vertisement for a gelatine factory. His owner is in 
all probability a sadder and a wiser man today. 



Daughters of Electioneer have produced 103 trotters 
and 16 pacers that have made records in standard 
time. Five new trotters and three pacers that were 
from his daughters entered the list the past season. 



George H. Ketcham stated before the Board of Re- 
view of the American Trotting Association at its late 
meeting that his sale of trotting horses to foreign 
oountrles for the past six years have averaged $150,000 
annually. 

In bis stables at Los Angeles W. G. Durfee has 
eleven McKlnneys, many of them very promising. 
About the best prospects among tbe many youngsters 
he Is beginning on are two by Coronado 2:18}, son of 
McKinney. Coronado Is certain to be a great sire. 

Eleata 2:08} by Dexter Prince bad an accident 
lately that it was thought would prevent her racing 
in the future. The injury Is in the hip, but It is now 
reported that she will recover and be able to start in 
the races of 1904, where she will doubtless be up 
among the money winners. 



The racing meeting at the Overland Park, Denver, 
next summer will beheld between the dates of Juno 
18th and July 4th inclusive. This will give a fourteen- 
day meeting instead of the usual thirteen days of 
racing, the addition of a day being for the purpose of 
having a program on July 4th. 



The chestnut gelding N. L B., that took a two-year- 
old pacing record of 2:21} and won the Breeders stake 
in 1899 at Santa Rosa, will be sold at Fred H. Chase As 
Co.'s salesyard January 14, 1904. N. L. B. is one of 
the best roadsters in the country, and can be driven 
by a lady. He has worked a trial in 2:12$. He is by 
Diablo 2:09}, dam by Washington 2:20, second dam 
by Skenandoah. 



Sam Fullen, winner of four stakes and a high class 
thoroughbred stallion, is advertised for sale in tho 
BBSBDBB and Sportsman. He is by Imported 
Cavalier, dam Lena Oliver by King Lear. Address, 
the owner A. Forbes, 5615 San Pablo Avenue, Oak- 
land, for full particulars. 

Tho final sale of Palo Alto horses will be hold 
Thursday evening, January 14th, at the salesyard of 
Fred H. Chas.e & Co., 1732 Market street, this city. 
Don't miss this opportunity. The last are nearly all 
foals of 1903, but they are the most promising year- 
lings the great farm has yet produced. 

Red Wilkes is maintaining his reputation well as a 
broodmare sire. His daughters produced twelve of 
last season's newcomers to the standard list, which 
makes the total number of standard performers pro 
duced by bis daughters so far as heard from one 
hundred and forty-seven, of which one hundred and 
five are trotters. 

Six yearlings by McKinney 2:1 1 J and six by Nut- 
wood Wilkes 2:16}, out of the very choicest mares of 
Paio Alto farm, should be worth bidding on when 
they are offered at Fred II. Chase A Co.'s salesyard, 
Thursday evening, January 14th. There are also 
yearlings by Monbells, MeDdocino, Iran Alto and 
Nazote to be sold. 



A decision handed down by the Suprome Court of 
tbe United States on December 7th, affirmed the ver- 
dict rendered by the Philadelphia courts (Judge 
Sulzberger), awarding Hughes & Fleming, of Bryn 
Mawr, Pa., $9,900 against the Pennsylvania Railroad, 
for injuries to tho pacer Montauk 2:16} in the West 
Philadelphia freight yard in 1900. 



Nutwood 2:18$ is the leading sire of dams of the 
new standard performers of 1903, so far as heard from 
to date. The number produced by his daughters 
that entered the list the past season is thirteen, and 
eleven of them are trotters. This makes a total of 
two hundred and fourteen standard performers that 
are already credited to his daughters. 



Elmo Montgomery, of Davisville, owner of the good 
colt Seymow 2:23, winner of tho two-year-old pacing 
division of the Breeders Futurity in 1903, was in the 
city this week and states that the colt is doing well. 
Seymow is by Diawood 2:11, dam Nancy H. by Up- 
start, second dam by a son of Gen. Taylor, and third 
dam a thoroughbred mare by Leinster. 



Belle Irvington's weanling foal by Waylaud W. 
2:12}, owned by B. L. Elliott of Mendocino, is one of 
the "best lookers of the crop of trotting-bred foals of 

1903. Mr. Elliott claims the name Irving W. for him, 
and says he knows he will be a good one as he never 
saw a Wayland W. colt that did not trot or pace fast 
whenever it was taken to a race track. Irving W. is 
a 6quare trotter. 

T. C. Cabney of Eureka writes us that he expects 
to ship his string to Pleasanton this week. He has 
the picer Fredericksburg 2:12 by Nephew Jr.; Lady 
Petrina by Directum, dam Petrina by Piedmont; 
Morosco, a green horse by Wayland W., dam Lady 
Moor by Grand Moor; and a couple of colts by Wald- 
stein. Mr. Cabney states that several other trainers 
expect to move from Eureka to Pleasanton soon. 

In Japan the grooms take no chances of getting 
kicked by going behind horses when in their stalls. 
Tho stalls in that country are so arranged that the 
horses are backed into them. The stalls are long and 
there is a door at the head to which is attached a 
grain box and a hay rack. The horse stands facing 
the door, and is tied to the hay rack. This door is 
swung open and the horse is led out when the stall is 
cleaned. ■ 

Chas. A. Durfee will sell four McKinneys at Fred 
H. Chase <& Co.'s salesyard, Thursday evening, 
January 14th. Two are young mares by McKinney 
and out of the famous mare Stemwinder, the dam of 
Directum 2:05}. There is also a filly by McKinney 
out of a mare by a son of Venture and a colt called 
Johnny McKenzle that Is one of the best prospects in 
California for the three year old trotting stakes of 

1904. He is a royally bred one and a good square 
trotter. These are all to be sold to dissolve a co- 
partnership. 

The bay filly by Nutwood Wilkes 2:10} out of the 
great race mare Expressive 2:12} by Electioneer, 
should b» worth a lot of money simply as a prospect. 
Expressive was one of the greatest three-year-olds 
ever foaled In America. At tho Palo Alto sale In 
New York last month she brought $1700, the top 
price of the sale. Sbols now twelve years old and 
this bay filly Is her foal of 1903. It should be one of 
tbe greatest prospects in California, and will go to 
the highest bidder at Fred H.Chase & Co.'s sales- 
yard, 1732 Market steet, on tbe evening of January 
14th. • 

In his interesting letter from Memphis printed in 
the Horsi Rn kir, Secretary Murray Howe says that 
Ed Geers has stepped Stanley Dillon by Sidney Dillon 
several heats better than 2:12. Three California 
trainers are domiciled at the Memphis track this 
winter, Millard Sanders, J. M. Nelson and W. M. 
Hendrickson. Nelson still keeps his fast green mare 
China Maid in active training and while ho gives her 
repeats, seldom asks her to beat 2:20. This is not 
very stiff work as she has been one mile as fast as 
2:05}. She is by McKinney out of Blanch Ward, 
second dam of Guy McKinney, and was bred by T. 
J. Drals, of Farmington, who sold her to the ex- 
Chinese Consul Ho Yow Millard Sanders is living 
In the cottage on tho grounds, recently vacated by 
Scott McCoy. He is giving his large bunch of Ax- 
worthy 2:15} colts easy work to date, as thoy are all 
soft. Anzella 2:00:} has been fired and looks like a 
new mare. Lou Dillon has her shoes off and is turned 
out in a large paddock every day. 



A yearling oolt by Mendocino 2:19} (sire of Monte 
Carlo 2:07}, oto.,) dam Carmine by Electrlcltr (sod of 
Electioneer and Midnight, dam of Jay Eye See 2:06}), 
second dam Consolation (dam of two in the list by 
Diotator, third dam Belle by Norman 25, fourth dam 
Vie by Mambrino Chief 11, will be sold at Fred H. 
Chaso & Co. 'a salesyard Thursday evening, January 
14th. This colt Is one of the best bred ones ever sired 
by Mendocino. 

Col. J. C. Kirkpatrick Is driving his three year-old 
colt Elden Bells on the Park roads and finds bim a 
very speedy youngster. The colt is a very handsome 
fellow and his breeding could hardlv bo surpassed, as 
he Is by Monbells 2:23} out of Elden (dam of Eleata 
2:08}) by Nephew, second dam Eleanor by Electioneer, 
third dam tho famous old thoroughbred mare Sallle 
Oaroner by Vandal. As bis breeding would indicate, 
Eldon Molls was bred at Palo Alto Suck Farm. 



M. W. Savage has recently purchased a number of 
broodmares, and now has at tho International Stock 
Food Farm seven mares that have produced 2:10 per- 
formers. No other farm In tho world has aB many. 
The mares are Belle, dam of Indiana 2:04}; Clara B , 
dam of Joe Pilot 2:09}; Maude, dam of Martha 
Marshall 2:0*5} : Argosa, dam of Argetta 2:08}; Colum- 
bine, dam of Capt. Brino 2:07}; Dolly Swili.dam of 
The Swift 2:00} and Lalla, dam of Kentucky Star 2:08. 



Nearly every man, woman and child in Fresno that 
admires a horse were at the track there Christmas 
Day to see a match race between Louis Bacbant's 
good pacer George and Charley Clark's pacer New- 
port. The match was for $500 a side and the result of 
a year's joshing and bantering back and forth. The 
race was won by Mr. Bachant in three straight heats 
in 2:16$, 2:19$ and 2:20}. The first heat George won 
easily, but in the next two he had to stretch his neck 
and won by a half length each time. George Is prob- 
ably the last new 2:20 performer of the year 1903. 
He is by Loeber, a son of Whippleton. 



The Paris mutual system was established in France 
in 1891. Since that time the public has bet $480,.".*::,- 
800 through this official betting system. During 1899 
the largest amount of money was placed and amounted 
to $51,000,000. The government receives 7} per cent 
from the amount bet on Parisian ' tracks and 10 per 
cent from all other race courses in France. Official 
figures show that the French Government derived 
$32,700,000 from this revenue in twelve years from 
the Paris tracks alone. During the same period Paris 
horse racing clubs received $18,200,000 for expenses 
in connection with the operation of the Paris 
mutuals. 

Pat O'Brien is working quite a number of horses at 
Lodi. One is a son of Oro Wilkes, dam Flora Belle, 
and is very promising. He also has acolt that he has 
named Cortelyou that is by Hero (.son of Director) out 
of a Dexter Prince mare. O'Brien has two two-year- 
olds by Daedalion that he says are crackerjacks. An 
association has been formed at Lodi and is now at 
work building a new track. Lodi is one of the best 
places in California to winter horses, and the so ! l 
thereabouts is much like that at Pleasanton, the 
hardest rains only making it better. The old track 
was cut up last year and planted to orchards and 
vineyards. 

W. G. Durfee brought back with him from his 
Eastern trip a stud colt by Peter the Great 2:07), sire 
of this year's sensational three-year-old Sadie Mac 
2:11}. The dam of this colt is Juanita 2:29, dam of 
Sinaloa 2:25$ by Sultan; second dam the great brood- 
mare Beulab, dam of Beuzetta 2:06$, Early Bird 2:10 
and four others in thb list; third dam Sally B , dam 
of Maurine 2:13} and two others, by Lever, son of 
Lexington. This colt showed a mile in 2:21, last half 
in 1:07}, after a few months work. He Is a good 
headed colt, quite handsome and perfect manners. 
He was foaled In 1900 and bred by J. Malcolm Forbes. 
A son of Peter the Great that is as well bred as this 
fellow should be an acquislticn to this Coast. 

The average colt at birth wlil weigh one hundred 
and ten pounds; at the end of the first year five hun- 
dred and twenty pounds; at tbe completion of Its 
second year, It will have gained two hundred and 
twenty-eight pouDde, thus making Its weight at that 
period seven hundred and eight pounds; It will have 
gained one hundred and eighteen pounds more during 
Its third year and at Its completion will tip tbe scales 
at nine hundred and twenty-Blx pounds, while at the 
fourth year It will have gained seventy pounds more, 
*,huB making Its weight nine hundred and ninety six 
is a four-year-old. These estimates are based on a 
3lMI of horses known as drivers and of course t"he 
figures do not apply to drafters, chunks or bronks. 



Mr. Alex Brown, proprietor of tbe Walnut Grove 
Farm, met with a severe loss on tho 23d of December. 
Chas. Spencer, the farm's trainer, was driving to the 
blacksmith shop with Aristina, full sister to the Opel- 
dent Stake winner Aristo 2:17} by Nushagak. Tho 
filly got frightened at some people standing on the 
top of the levee and shied very suddenly to one side, 
throwing Spencer out of the cart, and then jumped 
off the bank of the levee, which is twenty feet high 
at that place, Into the river. The filly was drowned 
before assistance could be had. Mr. Brown considers 
his loss a most severe one, not for the money value 
but owing to tho fact that Aristina was a filly whoso 
breeding and Individuality he prized very highly and 
was just what ho wanted and may not be able to re- 
place. She was very promising, having already 
shown 2:40 speed although only broken In October. 
Mr. Brown looked on her as beln;; even better than 
Aristo, and all horsemen know that he is considered 
one of tbe greatest trotters In California. We sym- 
pathize with Mr. Brown In tho loss of this filly and 
sincerely hope that no such bad luck will visit him in 
the future. 



6 



[JANUART 2, 1904 



Excellent Opportunity. 

Any good live horseman that knows anything at all 
about business can make money this year by purchas- 
ing the Sidney stallion William Harold 2:13} and 
placing him in the stud at some good locality in Cali- 
fornia. Mr. H. W. Meek, owner of the horse, intends 
to retire from horse breeding, and has already sold at 
auction all his broodmares. He has a few weanlings, 
yearlings and two year olds that will be sold later, 
and now offers William Harold at private sale. This 
stallion Is by Sidney, grandsire of Lou Dillon 1:58}, 
and is out of the great race and broodmare Cricket 
2:10dam of four in the list by Steinway. William 
Harold i.a* but very few foals old enough to be 
trained, and the onh two ever sent to a race track 
are the trotting mare Janice 2:08} that died a year 
ago, and the pacei Dun Burns 2:15. The William 
Harold colts and 61 lies are all naturally fast and have 
size and good looks. He is a well built, sound horse 
and will be well patronized in any community where 
good roadsters are bred. 

A Grandly Bred Two-Year-Old. 

Walter Mastin, formerly of Woodland but now of 
Sacramento, has sold to Mr. William Hashagan, a 
dark bay colt by McKinnby, dam Goldenrose by Fal- 
rose, second dam Lady Harper by Alaska, son of 
Electioneer, third dam Lady Gray by Algona, sire of 
Flying Jib 2:04, fourth dam by Odd Fellow. Mr. 
MaBtin received $525 for the colt before he was ever 
hooked up. When the colt was foaled Mr. Mastin 
called him Rosekin, but Mr. Hashagan has changed 
the name to Kinney Rose, which is certainly a very 
euphoneous as well as an apt cognomen. Kiuney Rose 
is entered and paid up on in the Breeders $6000 
Futurity for foals of mares bred in 1901. He will be 
two-y ears-old this spring and will very likely be 
started in the two-year-old division. 



Two Show Horses. 



About two years ago, Mr. P. W. Bellingall, the 
well known customs broker of this city, told two 
horses to parties who took them east. One was by 
Secretary, the other by Knight, and they are now 
said to bo one of the greatest pair of show horses in 
America, having *on the blue ribbon as a team at 
Djs Moines, Milwaukee, St. Louis and Hamline. The 
gelding by Knight, which was named Knight of 
Bellingall by his purchaser, won the blue ribbon 
shown single at Hamline, Milwaukee, Grlggsville, St. 
Louis, and at the Kentucky State Fair, Owensboro; 
he beat twenty cracks, including Mode Nicoll's crack 
gelding that afterward won from Rhea W., Com- 
mander Baker, and all the crack roadsters. 



Daedalion 2:11 to be Sold. 



. One of the comiDg great sires of speed in Californial 
as sure as he is given any chance in the stud, is Daeda- 
lion 2:11 by Diablo 2:09}, out of the great broodmare 
Grace by Buccaneer. His oldest foals are two-year- 
olds and the owners are so enthusiastic over them 
that all want to breed to him again. Geo. Fox has 
determined to sell Daedalion, however, aid be will 
goto the highest bidder. If the buyer wishes to 
train him we believe Daedalion can lower his record 
to 2:05 and win well In his class. He will be sold at 
Fred H. Chase & Co.'s salesyard, Thursday evening' 
January 14th. " 

The Lick House. 



The most popular hotel with Callfornlacs is The 
Llok, which has always catered to the best people 
and whloh has lately been newly furnished and re- 
modeled to make it still more attractive and popular. 
The new Grill room Is perfect In every detail and one 
of the most beautiful dining rooms In the world. 
Sinoe Mr. Geo. W. Kingsbury assumed the manage- 
ment of this great hostelry It has acquired the name 
of being the headquarters for the leading., business 
men of the Paolflo Coost. 

W. R. Murphy of Los Angeles has recently pur. 
ohased a thoroughbred colt by Nels Morris out of a 
mare by Hubbard. He Is called Copper Lion and U 
entered in two $1000 stakes to be decided at Ascot 
Park. He is working fast and will make the others 
run some to beat him. Mr. Murphy has commenced 
work on GoMen Boy, tbe McKlnney colt that was 
pictured on le front page of the BREEDER AND 
SPORTSMAN re. itly and states that he is showing up 
like a sure trottei 

A Penect Preparation. 



TjIs In what Mr D «lge of Springfield, III., says of Abso rblne 
It is cheerful aui psiltlve testimony: 

Springfield, III., Feb. 3, 1901. 

W. F. Young, Springfield, Mass. 

Dear Sir:— Abiorblne ts a perfect preparation 1 have seen 
the good effects from Its use, and cheerfully recommend It in all 
cases requiring an BbK>rbent. Yours truly. 

FRANK S. DODGE. 

Abtorblne.12 per bottle, express prepaid. 

Address W. F. YOUNG. P. D. F., Springfield, Mass. 



Horses for the Market. 

Mature and well broken horses are always the best 
sellers. A year or two spent In waiting for a horse 
to develop and educate means an expenditure of time 
and money on the part of the purchaser which is un- 
desirable as a rule unless the horse is bought specifi- 
cally for the purpose of fitting it for the finished mar- 
ket. The ideal age is five years, buyers usually pur- 
chasing animals ranging from five to eight. The 
classes vary somewhat in this respect. A horse in- 
tended for draft purposes may be marketed somewhat 
sooner than a harness horse or saddler. The breed 
to which a horse belongs has very little influence on 
the selling price. All that is required is a good indi- 
vidual of its class. A good horse always sells. Geld- 
ings are preferred somewhat generally to mares. 
Color does not figure so strongly as many would lead 
us to believe. Almost any color with excellence to 
back it will sell well except white, flea-bitten gray, 
mealy bay or any other color that might be terired 
washed out Among drafters, no special color seems 
to have a preference. With harness horses and sad- 
dlers, bays, browns and chestnuts have first prefer- 
ence, but grays and blacks sell readily if good. Well 
matched teams, both in harness and draft classes, 
usually bring higher prices than if sold singly. 

Condition is very often overlooked. It is absolutely 
essential ihat a horse be in good condition to bring 
what it is really worth. This is particularly true of 
animals of the draft type. Whether it increases the 
animal's real value is not necessary to consider. The 
market demands high condition and pays those men 
well who cater to it. The great lack of condition is 
shown by the fact that many horses are sent in for 
sale only to be reshipped to the country for further 
feeding. Condition is almost as essential as fat on a 
steer and its absence cuts from twenty-five to fifty 
per cent from the selling price of a horse. The re- 
quirements of the market in this line are well worthy 
of notice. Every class calls for an animal of intelli- 
gence and good disposition, willing to pull at a good 
rate or set a fast pace on the driveway and capable 
and cool-headed in an emergency. The use of horses 
on city streets, often among large numbers of pedes- 
trians, makes the latter particularly essential. The 
need of these qualifications is more important in some 
clas;es than in others. 

The most important requirement of a market horse 
is serviceable soundness — that is, having no chronic 
disease that will unfit it for work of a general nature. 
It must be sound in wind and in limb, able to do a 
reasonable amount of work without undue fatigue or 
premature breakdowns. The majority of horses sold 
to the city trade are compelled to do their work on 
hard, unyielding pavements, pulling heavy loads or 
developing speed that is an even greater strain on 
the feet and legs. The average period of usefulness 
on city streets of a horse sound at the start is not 
more than five years and it is manifestly decreased if 
It begins work in an unsound condition. Broken 
wind, sidebones, unsound bocks and all the various 
other ills to which a horse is heir should be strenu- 
ously guarded against, as they greatly diminish its 
value. 

The next requirement Is a conformation that will 
enable an animal to do hard work with a minimum of 
wear and give the longest possible period of sound- 
ness. Special emphasis should be placed on the foot, 
which should be of medium size with hard and dense 
horn, plenty of height to the heels and plenty of 
room between them, a large elastic frog and a nicely 
hollowed sole— in short, a sound, durable foot. The 
pastern slopes should correspond to that of tbe 
shoulder. These conditions — with flat, fully developed 
muscles, strong, well-developed joints, strongly sup- 
ported knees and hooks, dear clean-cut tendons 
standing well out from the leg and dense bone of a 
quantity sufficient to sustain the weight of the horse — 
will give a limb well calculated to withstand tie wear 
and tear of a city pavement. Joining tbe fore and 
hind quarter? we must look for a deep, fairly wide 
and compact middle piece with ample room for cb<st 
organs and no pinching at the waist. Too much 
width should be avoided as the action of tbe forelegs 
Is almost sure to be bad with suob a conformation. 

A short back is generally sought, especially one 
which shows the least possible amount of space be- 
tween tbelast ribs and the hips, giving a close coupled 
horse This is almost as essential as a sound foot. A 
long, loose-ribbed, open-jointed, wasp waisted animal 
is especially to be avoided. Such conformation in- 
dicates lack of strength ana" forecasts an early break- 
down. The shoulders should be deep and smooth 
and hind quartors deeply muscled, wide and well 
rounded. A sloping rump is always unsightly and 
detracts both from the use and value of the borse 
for it stands to roason that such a conformation can 
not furnish the same amount of muscle that a nicely 
rounded one can. The tail should be set high and 



smartly carried. Prominent shoulder points, hips 
and buttocks are objectionable. The neck should be 
clearly outlined, of moderate length and well muscled 
with a good chest. The head should be clean cut and 
of moderate length, with a rather small ear, much 
breadth and fullness of forehead, with a large, clear 
full, Intelligent eye and a wide open nostril. 

Some Statistical Siftings. 

[Horse Review.] 

McKinley 2:07 J is the fastest trotter on record whose 
dam is of untraced breeding. 

Stranger O. 2:09}, pacing, is the fastest harness per- 
former yet produced whose breeding is entirely un f 
known. i 

The only sire whose daughters have produced fonr 
trotters with records below 2:09 is Robert McGregor. 
The four produced by them are Grattan Boy 2:08, 
Jay McGregor 2:08, Elloree 2:08} and- York Boy (to 
wagon) 2:08}; all four are by Wilkes stallions. 

Caspian 2:07} and Caracalla 2:10, both by Patron 
2:14}, out of Cascarllla 2:25} by Shelby Chief, are the 
only own brother and sister with trotting records of 
2:10 or better. 

Lucy Homer, dam of Authoress 2:09} and Lecco 
2:09}, is the only mare who has produced two trotters 
with records below 2:10. She is by Homer, son of 
Mambrino Patchen, dam Dinnie 2:25 by Rochester, 
son of Aberdeen. 

Went worth 2:08 by Superior, son of Wood's Hamble- 
tonian, is the only 2:10 trotter yet bred in Canada. 

Patron 2:14}, Prodigal 2:16 and Patronage, all by 
Paocoast 2:21ij, out of Beatrice by Cuyler, are the only 
three own brothers who have all sired 2:10 trotters. 
Patron is sire of Caspian 2:07} and Caracalla 2:10; 
Prodigal of John Nolan, 4, 2:08; Patronage of Alix 
2:033. 

Nancy Hanks 2:04 by Happy Medium, dam ol 
Admiral Dewey, 3, 2:14} is the fastest trotting mare 
that has yet produced a standard performer. 

Rachel, 4, 2:08} by Baron Wilkes 2:18, dam of Great 
Spirit 2:11} trotting, 2:20 pacing, and Peace Commis- 
sioner 2:25}, trotting, is the fastest pacing mare who 
has yet produced a standard performer. Miss Logan 
2:06}, Sally Toler 2:06$, and Vera Capel 2:07} are all 
producers, but all took their best recorda after pro- 
ducing their foals. 

The fastest sire and son, pacing, are Joe Patchen 
2:01} and Dan Patch 1:56}, average record 1:58}, 

The fastest trotter out of a record dam is The 
Abbot 2:03} by Chimes 2:30}, dam Nettle King 2:20} 
by Mambrino King. Nettie King took her record in 
1891 and produced The Abbot in 1893. 

The fattest pacer out of a record dam is Free Bond 
2:04}, to wagon, by Simon, dam Princess Alice 2:23 
pacing, by Evan Lewis. Princess Alice took this' 
record in 1893 while carrying Free Bond, and reduced 
it the next season to 2:21} after foaling him. 

Primrose by Alexander's Abdallah Is the only 
mare who has produced ten producing sons. Beauti- 
ful Bells 2:29} by the Moor ranks second with eight. 

Peter tbe Great, 4, 2:07} is the only winner of the 
three year old Kentucky Futurity (1898) who has 
sired a winner of the same event — Sadie Mac, 3, 2:11} 
in 1903. 

Boralma 2:07 by Boreal (3) 2:15} is the only trotter 
to win both the three-year-old Kentucky Futurity 
and the Transylvania. He won the former in 1899 
and the latter in 1900. 

Rllma 2:08} by King Wilkes 2:22} is the only trotter 
who has ever won both the M. & M. at Detroit, and 
the Transylvania, at Lexington, a feat she performed 
in 1897. 

Crescaus 2:08 is the only trotter that has ever beaten 
2:10 over a half-mile track. 

Four pacers have beaten 2:05 over half-mile tracks: 
Dan Patoh 2:03}, Prince Alert 2:03}, Joe Patchen 2:04} 
and John R. Gentry 2:04}. 

McKlnney 2:11} by Aloyone2:27, dam Rosa Sprague 
by Gov. Sprague 2:20}, is the only sire of five 2:10 
trotters, the latter being Charley Mac 2:07}, Kinney 
Lou 2:07}, Hazel Kinney 2:09}, The Roman 2:09} and 
Dr. Book 2:10, All have race records. 

No sire has as yet sired a 2:05 trotter, and the dam 
of one. Director 2:17, sire of Directum 2:05} and of 
the dam of John A. McKerron 2:04}, misses it by a 
quarter second only. 



F. J. Yandel of Santa Rosa now has tbe mare 
Laurel by Nephew, second dam Laura C. 2:29} by 
Electioneer, third dam the thoroughbred mare 
Fanny Lewis by imp. Buckden. Laurel has a filly by 
Stam B. 2:11} that will be four years old in May next 
and is a great prospect. It is Mr. Yandel's intention 
to breed Laurel to Sidney Dillon this year if she is 
not sold. She is now with foal to Stam B. 



For all kinds of weather there is no drink like 
Jackson's Napa Soda — plain or in a lemonade. 



January 2, ltfUj 



'i 



Alexander's Belmont 64. 

Belmont wasa light bay horse with one white ankle 
behind, and stood about 10 hands high. He was bred 
by R. A. Alexander, and foaled at Wood burn Farm 
in 1864. He was bv Alexander's Abdallah, and was, 
undoubtedly, the handsomest, best finished and most 
elegant animal ever got by that renowned son of 
Rysdyk's Hambletonian. 

The dam of Belmont was Belle by Mambrino Chief 
11, and his second dam was Belle Lupe by Brown's 
Bellfounder. Belle, the dam of Belmont, also pro- 
duced the trotting stallion MeCurdy's Hambletonian 
2:26J, quite a successful sire of speed. Brown's Bell- 
Tounder, sire of the second dam of Belmont, was by 
imp. Ballfounder. The latter, as our readers will 
know, was from a family of horses called in England 
Norfolk trotters. 

The most famous trotters in England at the time 
Bellfounder was imported (1822) were members of this 
family. Bellfounder, the sire of imp. Bellfounder, 
originated from the same source as imp. Messenger. 
The latter was by Mambrino, he by Engineer, he by 
Sampson, he by Blaze, and he by the renowned Flying 
Childers, son of the famous Darley Arabian. Bell- 
founder was by Pretender, he by Fireaway, he by 
Driver, and he by Shales, a son of Blaze, the remote 
progenitor of imp. Messenger. 

The dam of Bellfounder, sire of imp. Bellfounder, 
was by Smuggler, he by Hue-and-Cry, he by Scott 
Shales, and he by Shales, the son of Blaze, mentioned 
above. It will be seen from this, that both the sire 
and dam of imp. Bellfounder's sire, were direct de- 
scendants of Flying Childers, through his son Blaze. 

It is needless to state that Flying Childers was the 
fastest horse in all England in his day, for that fact is 
well known to the readers of this paper. Brown's 
Bellfounder was considered the best bred son of Imp. 
Bellfounder. His dam was quite closely inbred to 
Imp. Messenger, and Messenger blood was then as 
now considered the most valuable in the world for 
transmitting the be6t of trotting action, as well as a 
strong inclination to stick to the trotting gait. The 
dam of Brown's Bellfounder was Lady Allport. Her 
sire was Mambrino, the thoroughbred son of Imp. 
Messenger, that got Abdallah, sire of Rysdyk's 
Hambletonian. The dam of Lady Allport was by 
Tippoo Saib, another thoroughbred son of Imp. 
Messenger, and her second dam was a daughter of 
Imp. Messenger. As Mambrino Chief, sire of the 
dam of Belmont, was by Mambiino Paymaster, a 
son of Mambrino, by Imp. Messenger, it will be seen 
that Belmont had a very strong inheritance from 
Messenger on both sides. 

Belmont was never raced. It is stated upon good 
authority that he was worked some for speed on the 
Woodburn Farm track, and trotted a mile in 2:29J"as 
a five year old. When seven years old he trotted a 
mile in 2:28$ on Woodburn track. He was used ex- 
clusively for stock purposes, and was allowed to per- 
form but a limited amount of service each season, 
not exceeding fifty, if memory serves us right. 

The broodmares at Woodburn Farm were a choice 
lot. Belmont was the most popular trotting stallion 
that had ever stood at Woodburn, and the best of 
the trotting broodmares there were mated with him. 
The proprietor of Woodburn did not campaign trot- 
ters. He bred to sell, and the reputation of bis stock 
was such that he got good prices. Had he trained 
the get of Belmont for tin cup records that horse's 
list of standard performors would doubtless have 
been much larger than at present. When their 
owners began to race the get of Belmont, however, 
they soon found that they were capable of getting the 
money. 

One of the mares mated with him in his five year 
old form was the now famous Miss Russell. The 
produce was the renowned Nutwood 2:18}, foaled in 
1870. Among Belmont's crop of foals for 1871 were 
VVedgewood 2:19, Dick Moore 2:22J and Nil Desper- 
andum 2:24, three as game trotters as were ever got 
by one sire in a single season. 

The dam of Wedgewood was the famous Woodbine, 
by Woodford, a thoroughbred son of Kosciusko. 
Dick Moore's dam was Mary, a thoroughbred daugh- 
ter of Monmouth Eclipse, and Nil Desperandum was 
from a mare of unknown breeding. It was not long 
before horsemen who wished to compliment a horse 
highly for bis racing qualities would say "he is as 
game as a Belmont." 

Belmont's get were also noted for beauty as well as 
speed and gameness. The stallion King Rene, by 
Belmont, was one of the most noted blue ribbon win- 
ners of his day. He was a formidable rival of Mam- 
brino King in the show ring, and sometimes got the 
decision over that beautiful son of Mambrino Patchen, 
that had been pronounced by Borne "the handsomest 
horse in the world." 

Belmont was always kept at Woodburn Farm from 
the day he was foaled in 1804, to that of his death, 



Nov 15, 1889. He is now credited with 40 trottors 
and 10 pacers, that have made records in standard 
time. Seventy-four of his sons have sired a total of 
493 trotters and 157 pacers, that have mado standard 
records. 

The most successful of his sons as sires of standard 
performers are Nutwood 2:18:}, now credited with 134 
trotters and 35 pacers; King Bene 41 trotters and two 
pacers; Egmont 32 trotters and nine pacers; Wedge- 
wood 20 trotters and 15 pacers; and Vatican 16 trotters 
and five pacers. Nutwood 2:18J, has shown much 
greater speed perpetuating ability than any other of 
Belmont's sons, and his progeny in tho standard list 
bids fair to eventually outnumber that of all the other 
sons and daughters of Belmont. — American Horsi 
Breeder. 

The Sulky Maud S. Pulled. 

The news from Chicago is to the effect that the sons 
of the late Robert Bonner, who was noted as an ad- 
mirer of fast trottors and who owned Maud S. when 
she beat all of tho then existing trotting records by 
compassing a milo at Cleveland in 2:08|, have pro- 
tested tho high sulky record of 2:05 made over the 
same course last summer by Lou Dillon, the present 
champion trotter. 

The protest has been lodged with the American 
Trotting Register Association, whose office is in Chi- 
cago, and will be considered by the officers of that 
organization at a meeting soon to be held. It is this 
association that publishes the Year Book, which is 
accepted as the final authority on all pacing and trot- 
ting records. It is understood theBonners will make 
a stiff fight. Tho points on which they base their 
claim that tha record should be thrown out are that 
the sulky pulled by Lou Dillon, while of the regula- 
tion wheel type, was provided with ball bearing hubs, 
thereby making the vehicle much less difficult to d rag 
at a high rate of speed than a sulky not thus equipped. 
Also that a wind shield was used on the sulky of the 
running horse which preceded Lou Dillon during the 
2:05 mile. 

Regarding the application of the heirs of the late 
Robert Bonner for the setting aside, by the proper 
authorities, of the high-wheel sulky record of Lou 
Dillon there has arisen a spirited discussion. It is 
the claim of the applicants that the record of 2:05 set 
by the California mare should not be recognized be- 
cause it was made to a high-wheel 6ulky fitted with 
ball-bearings, while the sulky pulled by Maud S. was 
not so equipped, also that the record should be re- 
jected for the further reason that it was made behind 
a wind shield. With the latter contention this paper 
has nothing to do beyond what it has already said on 
the subject. But the first claim has been the means 
of bringing into discussion just what kind of sulky 
Maud S. was hooked to in her famous record mile July 
25, 1885. Not a few horsemen have stubbornly 
adhered to the assertion that it was fitted with ball- 
bearings. In order to get at the truth of the matter 
the Stock Farm wired to S. Toomey & Co., the well- 
known sulky bulldere, who have boen in the business 
for a half century, asking what style sulky was pulled 
by Maud S., and when the ball-bearing attachment 
was first used on the high-wheel sulky. The answer 
settles the question most conclusively, and is as 
follows: 

Canal Dover, Ohio, Dec. 19, 1903. 
Kentucky Stock Farm, Lexington, Ky.: 

The record of Maud S. was made to friction axle. 
Ball bearings In high-wheels first used about 1887. 

S. Toomey & Co. 

Now all that remains to be settled Is whether the 
Lou Dillon sulky was equipped with ball-bearings. 
On that point Mr. George Dietrich, secretary of the 
Cleveland Driving Club, over whose track both 
records were made, Is reported as having stated that 
it was a friction axle sulky, the same as was the one 
used for Maud S. If Mr. Dietrich Is correct the con- 
troversy Is at an end. He may, however, be mistaken. 
If he is, then the record of Maud S. has not been 
lowered. That Lou Dillon can do It, though, there 
is no doubt in the mind of any one who is not 
biased.— .Hy. Stock Farm. 

Silver Bow to Be Sold. 

At the Splan sale to be held at Chicago January 
18th to 23d we notice that among the other horses 
consigned is Geo. H. Fox's stallion Silver Bow 2:10 
by Robert McGregor 2:1 7 j , out of Sadie by Hamble- 
tonian 10. Silver Bow has left stock in this State 
that is very valuable, and his daughters are certain 
to be great broodmares. During the past two yeai s 
Silver Bow has been at Toledo, Ohio, under lease to 
George H. Ketcham, owner Of Cresceus. Silver Bow 
should be a very valuable horse on any stock farm 
that is breeding for speed, size, good looks and style. 

Strike!— if they don't give you Jackson's Napa 
Soda when you ask for it. 



Look to the Teeth. 



When a horse is particular about what he eats and 
does not seem to thrive on his rations, he requires at- 
tention. In such oases look first to the teeth or better 
still, have a veterinary surgeon do so. Teeth that 
are sharp prove a constant source of irritation, not 
only when the animal is eating, but when driving, 
and it Is little to be wondered at if an animal con. 
stantly suffering pain should take on an unthrifty 
appearance. Where horses are fed wild hay thereis 
always more or less danger of their getting beaded 
heads lodged between the te6th and cheek, or, in 
some instances, these may lodge under the tongue 
and cause groat discomfort. Frequently a bead of 
wild rye lodged under tho tongue or beside the cheek 
has caused death, this finally being induced by the 
head burrowing into tho flesh. The outlay of a dollar 
or such a matter for an examination of this kind 
should not be considered for a moment, because this 
amount may be saved in the course of a week or two 
by the use to which an 1 nimal, after being treated, 
will eat his feed. Where there are many horses on 
the farm it will certainly pay to purchase a tooth 
rasp, and this should be used at least twice a year on 
all horses whoso teeth present sharp edges. 



New Stake in Kentucky. 

The Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders Association 
has announced a new race, the Stoll Stakes, a sweep 
stakes for foals of 1902, which closed January tj 1904, 
with a forfeit of $100. The race is of two heats of one 
mile each, and each heat a race. A horse distanced 
in the first heat will not be permitted to start in the 
second. Position s will be drawn for in each heat. 
More than one entry may be named by the same 
nominator provided the $100 forfeit is paid 011 -each. 
No further payment will be required till six o!clock 
the evening before the race, when $150 must be paid 
on each entry expected to start. The $100 forfeit 
must be paid on or before January 1, 1904, and must 
accompany the nomination — no credit to, anybody. 
The money will be divided 30 per cent to first, 1 2 J per 
cent to second, seven and one-half per cent to third 
horse in each heat. The race will be trotted when 
nominations are three years old (in 1905), the week 
following the race for the Kentucky Futurity for foals 
of 1902, but money winners in the Kentucky Futurity 
will not be allowed to start in the Stoll Stakes. If 
entered in the Futurity, entrance money will be re- 
turned. 

Oldest Son of Hambletonian 10. 



It might be interesting to know that Orange 
Blossom 2:20* by Hambletonian is still livirg in his 
thirty-sixth year at the home of his owner, H. B. 
Holton, Powhattan, Md. He made his record at the 
spring meeting of June 2, 1875, at Charter Oak Park, 
and would doubtless have won the race, but old 
Batchederfer ran into him, cut him down, in which 
the tendons of the near hind leg wore cut off. The 
writer, Cyrus Lukens, in Sport*' of the Times, saw 
him again at Charter Oak Park, Sept. 1, 1875, with 
his leg in a horrid condition. It was six months be- 
fore Mr. Holton could take him home. That he 
should recover and live to his thirty-sixth year Is 
remarkable. • : 

Sober up on Jnolronn 's Napa Sods. 



Warranted to Give Sat 1*1 motion. 

Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Sate, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hoelc, 
Strained Tendoni, Founder, Win! 
Putts, and all lamcnesi from Spavin. 
Ringbone and other bony tumors, 
Cures all akin diieaiea or Parasites, 
Thrush. Diphtheria. Remove* all 
Bunchci from Horses or Cattle. 

ts a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc. it In lurahiable. 

livery bottlo of Caustic Balsam "old Is 
Warranted to (Tlve satisfaction, j'rlcn $1 50 
per bottlo. Bold by druggists, or sent by ex- 
press, charges j»ald, with full directions for 
its uso. tvsend for descrlptlvo circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 0. 



s 



[January 2, 1804 




ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 




The Gadwall or Gray Duck. 

This duck is usually known locally as the "gray 
duck," the latter name being the one it is almost 
always called by practical hunters. Essentially a 
fresh-water marsh duck, like his slightly larger 
cousin, the mallard; greedy in his table habits, yet 
particular, and favoied to an even greater extent 
than most of his luxurious tribe in the dual excellen- 
cies of fat add attendant delicacy of flavor, the gad- 
wall every year about this time forces his way into 
the favor of those sportsmen who happily combine 
the pleasures of the epicure with those of the shot- 
gun. The bird is just now to be found in unusual 
numbers in the San Joaquin and Sacramento basins, 
as well as further south on the shooting grounds clear 
to the border line. Wherever the marksman's well- 
directed shot may bring his body bouncing to the 




On tlie AlarNh near Burdell's 

earth, there may be found a broad-breasted, cleanly- 
feathered bird with a solid, leady "feel" about it that 
betokens many a sweet, tasty morsel when the quick 
oven has done its work. A lean gadwall is as much 
of a rarity as a thin teal; perhaps even more scarce, 
for the bird is not to be found except in places where 
abundant food is to be had. 

Measuring slightly less than the adult mallard, the 
gadwall often weighs as much, and the female is 
marked slightly like the greenhead's mate, being not 
Infrequently mistaken for her by inexperienced shoot- 
ers, though the distinctive marks are many and well 
defined. The drake gadwall in the full glory of his 
midwinter plumage ie one of the handsomest of birds, 
not so much because of any brilliant dazzle as from 
sober, but warm hues of his feathers, and the surpass- 
ing elegance of bis form. With a broad, black bill, a 
grayish mottled head and a breast of the same, striped 
and soaled with lines of the most lustrous black ; white 
underneath with a glossy black tail, and chestnut 
wing coverts, the gadwall differs from the mallard 
and most shallow water ducks in having no bright 
spot on the wing, a plain white bar edged with black 
being the only ornament. The long feathers which 
overlap the wing when folded are beautifully mottled 
with shades of brown and black, while the brilliant 
orange of the bird's feet serves to set off the rest and 
make him a truly aristocratic-looking creature — an 
appearance which is in no wise belied by bis habits. 

The female is much more sober in her markings, 
and has a black-and-yellow bill, being much smaller 
than her handsome spouse. In fact, the excessive 
difference in size between the male and female gad- 
wall has caused many hunters to think they were not 
the same variety. 

Being a close relative to the mallard, and in some 
sections of the country called "gray mallards, " the 
gad wall are naturally sought for upon much the same 
class of marsh as that favored by the greenheads. 
They are often knocked down out of small bunches of 
mallards, and mallards on the other hand, often 
travel with their smaller relative?, one being seldom 
found in great numbers without the other being close 
at hand. Their food is practically identical. Both 
ducks like grain and will fly far to get it. That fail- 
ing, they eat certain marsh mosses, the seeds of 
various plants, hemp in particular wheD available, 
and in some parts of the country beech mast or other 
acorns. Like all ducks they catch manj insects, and 
occassionally Indulge in angleworms, slugs, little frogs 



and the like, though a vegetable diet is more to their 

ll Gad wall demand fresh water, and dislike exceed- 
ingly to leave it, resorting to trio ocau rather less 
than most varieties of ducks on this coast. While 
well represented everywhere they are seldom ttie 
object of special pursuit; being killed in fair uumbei b 
among other duclcs, haunting shallow sloughs, which 
can be waded easily with a pair of hip boots, ibey 
flock rather more than the mallaius Uo, but are 
hardly what would be called gregarious lowl, never 
appearing in the vast clouds that characterize the 
sprigs and widgeon, but being usually noticed in pairs, 
or iu small family pariieB of less than a dozen. 

The recognition of gadwall on the wing is 
possible at a great distance, as there is only one uuu 
for which they are llKely to be mistaken- the 
mallard The dark head, uioad wings and compara- 
tively slow speed of the tfreeuheau uislinguisb him 
from every other ddok, oven when hla meaow voice 
is inaudible, and the strident squaw k o> Mrs. Maliaiu 
requires no vision- The gadvsail Ihcs lastor, looKs a 
little smaller, aud has a diflereht 
quack, less strident iu lone, and more 
uitlicult to imitate properly. At 
tiuic-s the male bird utters a peculiar 
whistling note. Tue drake gadwall 
may be picked out at a great dis- 
tance in the air by their superior 
slZd anJ seemingly black breasts. 
Tue under sdrfaco of the wing is 
darker than that of a mallard. 
There is no need of distingdishing 
them from theother duck, uowever, 
as the gadwall is, if anything, the 
best biru of the two for table dses. 

Gadwall decoy better than mal- 
lards; in fact, they come in to stool 
splendidly, aud 11 one can Imitate 
their peculiar, resonant call proper- 
ly, and does not abuse his ability, he 
will often kill a limit string, and they 
will be the best birds in the bunch. 
At times, especially when much per- 
secuted they become very wary, and 
exceedingly ditlicult to secure; but 
oven under such circumstanees will 
circle down from a great height to 
inspect a well placed stand ol decoys. 
Although a big, strong duck they die 
oa.ily and wheucrippled arenothard 
to captdre. In Minnesota and the 
IJakotas, where, in the fall of the 
year, extensive s hallow sloughs form 
on the prairies, after the October 
rains, gadwall are the chief duck, 
and number five shot is generally 
advocated for their pursuit. On the 
Coast, where all kinds of ducks are 
met with in a day's shooting, sixes 
are a general favorite, and it may be 
truly said for them that a well-direct- 
ed load will stop anything within 
reason from a canvasback to a teal, though the indi- 
viduality of guns often makes one size of shot supe- 
rior to another for all around work. 

In Mississippi and Missouii valleys the gad wall fully 
live up to all the sportsmen's traditions regarding 
their unfailing good condition, being frequenters of 
the rice marshes and adjacent grain fields from 
September until the icy bonds of winter close up all 
but the swiftest running water. They resort in great 
numbers to the drowned oak and beech woods in the 
spring of the year when food is rather scarce and the 
freshets run high, often affording very pretty sport 
to a pair of skilled hunters, one of whom does the 
shooting and the other carefully pilots the boat 
through the openings, taking turn about. The birds 
are jumped mostly, though sometimes an observant 
hunter notes a flight or "pass" Into a favorite over- 
flowed resort where a stand is selected from which 
the shooter has no trouble to knock over the big 
birds as they come in. The mallards and red- 
heads often resort to such places at the same 
time as the gadwall. All three manifest the 
same love of seclusion amid different surround- 
ings od the Coast. 

o 

Wild pigeons have been very numerous In 
the vicinity of Paso Kobles. These birds stool 
well to decoys — the dead ones set out are ex- 
cellent for that purpose. 



C. W. Minor of Victoria, B. C, was last week 
awarded $200 damages for the loss of his well- 
known Setter dog Roy Montez. He brought 
suit for $1000 and the case was tried in the 
Victoria County Court before a jury. Evi- 
dence given went to show that the dog had 
attempted to cross the track on the Birdcage 
Walk incline, in front of an advancing car, 
then descending the elope toward the bridge, 
and that being unable to clear the track was 
knocked over and sustained fatal injuries. The 
defense contended that the rush of the dog 
was so 9udden and swift that no human power 
could have intervened to stop the car in time: 
that the car was do. going at more than the 
statutory rate of speed, and that all reasonable 
effort was exerted to avert the accident. The 
complainant charged culpable negligence on 
the part of the motorman, and claimed that 
due diligence was not shown in attempting to 
prevent the accident. 



Weldoer photo 



The Grand American Handicap. 

The Indianapolis Gun Club is to be congratulated 
on securing the Grand American Handicap for 1904. 
The Interstate Shooting Association, which contiole 
the American tournament, has decided that the big 
tourney is to be held In Indianapolis next spring. The 
Grand American Handicap is the greatest trap 
shooting event in the world and it is propised to 
make the next tournament the greafe&t ever held, 
'i'he Indianapolis Gun Club is less I ban nine monthe 
old, but it has the largest membership, with possibly 
the exception of one or two clubs, of any organization 
in the country, its membership is composed of the 
best professional and amateur shooters in that city, 
State and country and prominent business men as 
well. Before the club house was finished the club 
secured the Indiana State tournament for 1&04, which 
is the most important tourney in the State'and ranks, 
it is claimed, second to the national shoot. The Stale 
tournament is set for June 8, 9, 1904, but it may be 
held earlier if the Interstate Association decides to 
hold the grand American Handicap in June of next 
year. The Indianapolis Gun Club did not secure the 
coveted Grand American Handicap without opposi- 
tion. The St. Louis Gun Club and the Denver Gun 
Club bid strongly for the event. The St. Louis Club 
claimed that the tourney should go to that city In 
view of the World's Fair there next year. The club 
offered $5000 to bo added to the most important 
events if the handicap should be awarded to St. 
Louis. The Denver Club also made tempting offers, 
but they were not considered. The Indianapolis Club 
offered no added purses, but it had the co-operation 
of about one hundred of the most prominent shooteis 
of the country, and the Interstate Association con- 
sidered the application. ' If St. Louis business men 
were willing to donate a handsome sum to be added 
to the purses, it seems as if the business men and the 
hotels of this city, "says the Journal, "should con- 
tribute a suitable purse lo be added to one of the 
events. If the Indianapolis Gun Club makes the 
tournament a big success it has every assurance that 
the Grand American Handicap wilfbe given to this 
city for several years to come." 

It is quite probable that the big shoot will be made 
an international tournament, so as to induce the 
foreign shooters coming to this country next year to 
participate. This could be done by giving such an 
event in connection with the Grand American Handi- 
cap, the latter being open to American shooters only. 
With nearly 500 shooters, it is estimated who will be 
present in the city during the tournament, tbeie 
promises to be lively times on the firing lice. Success 
to tho Indianapolis Gun Club and the Crand Ameri- 
can Handicap. 

Chicago Show. 

The Chicago Kennel Club has decided to bold its 
annual show on March 17th, 18th and 19th, at the 
First Regiment armory. The kennel club stati s, ex- 
plicitly, that the coming dog show is intt ndtd wholly 
to advance the class of dogs, and that revenue cuts a 
secondary figuro. 

To judge from the advance order for entry blanks, 
the March show will be the largest ever held in Chi- 
cago. Over 1000 individual entiies, it is estimated, 
will be received — that is to say, 1000 dogs will be 
benched, to say nothing of classes in which one dog 
will be entered perhaps three or four times, to it is 
claimed by a Chicago exchange. 

The officers of the club are: H. J. Cassady, Presi- 
dent; P. Heorici, Jr., Treasurer; S. Summerfield, 
Secretary. 

United States Fish Commissioner Bowers of Wash- 
ington has made an offer to the State of Oregon to 
take over and operate the great salmon hatchery at 
Ontario, Or., to its full capacity provided the State 
will agree to enlarge it, as may be required. 

The Ontario plant has just been completed by the 
State and this season turned out 20,000,000 eggs. The 
Government at present operates three plants in Ore- 
gon. Clackamas, Big White Salmon and Little 
White Salmon, the output of these three latter 
hatcheries this season beiDg 34,500,000 eggs. 




A Stand of Decoy • on tbe Cordelia Marih 



January 2, 1904J 



&hc gvccbcv mtfc £t port* man 



The Bloodhound. 



Not since the S. F. K. C. show hero in '98 have we 
seen anything at all approaching a typical Blood- 
hound. At that show four good ones were benched 
by the Mount Shasta kennels. Two kennels of ten or 
twelve alleged Bloodhounds came under our inspec- 
tion at the Los Angeles 6how two years ago. Several 
of the dogs were kept out of the ring at our request, 
for they were not Bloodhounds and for those 
brought in, although they showed to a little extent 
some Bloodhoued crossing, the best we could do was 
to award a ribbon in a kennel contest, not because 
they were Bloodhounds. 

These very dogs had a groat reputation in the 
Southern county as man and varmint trailers. So 
have other mongrel packs in different parts of the 
Coist. Their nun-huntingqualities, notwithstanding 
sensational stories in the columns of the dailies, have 
invariably turned out to be a my tbical quantity. Wo 
do not at present know of a breeder on the Coast wbo 
has a strain of dogs at all approaching the typical 
standard of the breed. W hut has become of the dogs 
and their progeny shown by the Ml. Shasta Kennels 
we do not know, at all events they were very good 
dogs and should have been appreciated. Possibly, 
the fact, that long-eared yellow mongrels, commonly 
and erroneously called Missouri hounds, could be pur- 
chased as Bloodhounds for a few dollars bad souie- 
tbing to do witb tbe passing of a well established 
Bloodhound kennel. 

We are ol tbe impression that Bloodhounds can be 
trained to trail and dud a human being — the pei pe- 
trator of a crime, fugitive from justice or a person 
lost in the woods or mountains. Bloodhound trials 
having proven the practicability of the breed for that 
purpose. Tne numerous failures en the Coast 
receutly and in the past where dogs have been used 
resulted from improperly traiued mongrels more than 
any thing else. 1 he breed to a great e-xtent out here 
is unknown and much misunderstood. Thefollowing 
article by Mr. Edwin Brougb in the Illustrated Ken- 
nel Xeus is interesting and we take tbe liberty of 
quoting it in full.j 

"O'er all, the bloodhound boasts superior skill, ) 
To sceai, to view, 10 turu, aud boldly kill — 
His fellows' vale alarms rejects wnb scorn, 
True to tbe master's voice aud learned boru; 
His nostrils oft, if ancient fame sings true, 
Traced tbe sly felon thro' ibu tainted dew; 
Once snult'd, be follows witn unaltered aim, 
Nor odours lure bim from tbe chosen game; 
Deep-muutb'd, he thunders, and inflamed he views, 
borings on relentless, and to death pursues." 

— Tickell. 

"And though the villaib 'scape a while, he feels 
SI jw vengeance like a bloodnound at bis heels." 

— Swift. 

''Count Le Couteulx deCanteleu (without doubt the 
greatest living authority on the subject) is quite 
positive that the Bloodhound, or Sleuthhound (and 
bis predecessor, the Talbot), were derived from the 
St. Hubert, from St. Hubert's Abbey in the Ardennes. 
This breed dates from the earliest ages, and certainly 
existed in the time of tbe Gauls. in tbe eighth 
century it was known as the Flemish hound, aud was 
divided into two sub-divisions — the black and the 
white. The most highly esteemed were tbe black 
(ready Black and-Tan), and tbe Abbots of St. 
Hubert's Abbey maintained the breed very carefully, 
in memory of tneir founder. These hounds possessed 
great hunting qualities, particularly that of Keeping 
true to the scent. 

'They were deep-throated, fine noted hounds, 
showing great powers of endurance, but not great 
swiftness, and were very courageous and dariDg. 
They were chiefly prized as limiera for unharboring 
the wild boar. They were generally of a slightly 
reddish-black, with tan marks over tbe eyes, and on 
the legs and feet, long pendulous ears, well-shaped, 
but rather long loins, not so high on tbe leg as the 
Normandy hound." 

The Abbots of St. Hubert presented three couples 
of hounds yearly to the King of France as a token of 
allegiance, and they were used as limiere for wolf and 
boar. 

The Count says: "The characteristic features and 
qualifications of this famous breed seem to have been 
much better preserved in England in the Blood- 
hound." 

The Count took tbe greater part of Lord Wolver- 
ton's pack In 1881, but he had been hunting Blood- 
hounds for some years previous to this, and his 
kennel list for season 1876 and 1877 tells of 

Names remembered, 
Because they, llvlbg not, can ne'er be dead " 

— such names as Holford's Regent and Matchless, 
Becker's Brenda and Duchess, Cowen's Druid and 
Dewlap, Pease's Druid, Jenning's Tiger, Fury, and 
Druid, the latter sold to Prince Napoleon. The best 
of the best of our hounds to-day are full of this 
blood. 

The Count never tires of singing the praises of 
these hounds "I have never seen more beautiful 
hounds, nor keener ones. The way they killed deer 
and wild boar was admirable, but unfortunately tbe 
boars killed too many for me." 

In 1900 the count bad in his pack a three-year-oid 
dog descended from the Bloodhounds, but with a 
slight cross, which he bought back on account of his 
superb qualities. He was very fast, had a grand 
voice, and was extraordinarily courageous and power- 
ful. He could throw down a very large boar, but has 
probably been killed by this time. 

In France it is the custom on St. Hubert's Day 
(November 3d) for the priest to bless the pack col- 
lectively after mass, and to bless the oldest member 
of the hunt, the oldest horse, and the oldest hound, 
and the priest attaches a red rosette to the button- 



holo of the man and to the neck »f the horse, and of 
the hound 

In one of the pedigrees in the kennel list mentioned 
above appears a St. Hubert hound, and this must 
have oeon one of the last of the breed, as it became 
extinct about that time. 

St. Huberts were brought over to England at tho 
time of tho Conquest, and also when Henry IV. sent 
some over as presents to James I. 

Tho old writers seem all agreed that the speciality 
of the Bloodhound is that he has a more delicate nose 
and can hunt a lighter scent then any other hound, 
and that ho is especially "free from change," as tho 
French say— i e, that he will never change from tho 
hunted animal ton fresh one. 

In Barbour's Bruce, a poem written in the four- 
teenth century, we are told : 

"A sleuth bund had be thar alsua. 
Sa giui that wahl cbang for na thing." 

And again: 

"The klngls sent, ho wryst ryebt welll, 
Thut he uauld chaung it for na tblng." 

The Sporting IHctmnaru, published 1803, says: 
"The hounus destined to one particular kind of 
busiuess or pursuit, as Bloodhounds, wore never 
brought into the chase for a constancy with tbe pack 
for the | romotion of sport, but were preserved and 
supported (as a constable or Bow-street runner of the 
present day ) for the purpose of pursuit and detection, 
wherever they could, with certainty, be laid on in 
good time upon the scent or footsteps of the object it 
was thought expedient to pursue. Deer-stealing, for 
instance, was so very common a century since to 
what is at present, that the game and park keepers 
in most parts of the kingdom were in a kind of eternal 
watching and noctual warfare; the hounds we are 
now describing were then constantly trained to tbe 
practice, and so closely adhered to the scent they 
were once laid upon, that (even after a very long and 
tedious pursuit} detection was certain and inevitable; 
from this persevering instinct and infallibility, they 
acquire tbe appellation they have so long retained; 
and an offending criminal not a century since, was 
absolutely conceived to be positively taki n, and half- 
convicted, tbe very moment a Bloodhound could be 
obtained." 

In Horseand the Hound, by Nimrod (Chas. Apperley) 
published 1842, we read the Bloodhound 
•'possessed tho property of unerringly tracing tho 
scent he was laiu upon, amongst a hundred others; 
wbich evinces a superiority, at all events a peculi- 
arity, of nose entirely unknown to our lighter hounds 
of any breed. The want of being able to distinguish 
the hunted fox from a fresh-found one is the bane 
of English fox hunting, and here are not wanting 
those who think that, in the breeding of the modern 
Foxhound, the minor points of high form and blood 
are more frequently considered than they should be 
in preference of a regard to nose." 

In border warfare the Sleuth-hound played a most 
'mportant part. When the beacon-fire blazed, the 
country rose; all men, on horso or foot, were bound 
to "follow the fray with Hue and Cry" upon the pain 
of death: the Slogan was sounded, and the pursuit by 
Hot Trodd rapidly made. Tho laws of Elizabeth in 
1563 still permitted the custom of the Marches of 
pursuit by the aggrieved parties by "Lawful Trodd 
with Hound and Horn, with Hut and Cry, and all 
other accustomed manner of fresh pursuit, for the 
recovery of their goods spoiled. " The offender could 
be lawfully pursued in Hot Trodd by the warden of 
either kingdom into the opposite realm, and, if over- 
taken and apprehended, brought back. Tho pursuit 
was often followed with a lighted turf carried on a 
spear. 

The Sleuth-hound of that time was so heavy and 
slow, that he was taken up and carried on the saddle 
bow for a time when the pursuers came to soft ground, 
where the trail was visible. If the horse of that 
period was faster than the* Bloodhound, the latter 
must indeed have been slow. 

During the first half of the last century the Blood- 
hound seems to have fallen out of use either for man 
hunting or for the hunting of animals. He became 
very scarce, but the institution of dog shows fortu- 
nately saved him from total extinction. His majestic 
appparance and docile disposition gained bim many 
friends, though amongst the uninformed he Is still 
sometimes regarded as a ferocious monster endowed 
with miraculous attributes, and capable of pursuing 
his victim successfully under any conditions till 
caught, when he would crtaloly tear him limb from 
limb. This may probably be accounted for partly by 
his name, which is calculated to inspire awe, and 
partly by slave hunting tales in Uncle Tom's Cabin 
and similar books. As a matter of fact, the hounds 
used for slave hunting in tbe Southern States of 
America, although called Blood houndp, were not 
Bloodhounds at all, but merely the Foxhound of tho 
country, sometimes crossed with tho Cuban Mastiff 
or, as it was sometimes called the Cuban Blood hound. 
Tho latter animal"had no pretension to bo called a 
Blood hound, or in fact a hound at all, and was more 
like an inferior Groat Dane than anything olse, 
though it is not believed that it over attained to any 
really fixed type. 

As regards the name of Bloodhound the Count Lo 
Couteulx beliovesthat when fox huntingin something 
like its present form was instituted, it was found that 
the Sleuth-hound was not fast enough for tho purposo 
and the present Foxhound was evolved from various 
material, and that about this time it became usuil in 
speaking of the old hound of the country, to call him 
the Bloodhound , meaning tho hound of pure blood 
(as we should speak of a blood horse), to distinguish 
him from the now hound or Foxhound. 

The slave hunting hounds were trained to pull down 
their man, but it wonld not be possible to do this with 
the Bloodhound, and it Is a daily occurrence to hunt 
an entire stranger with pure Bloodhounds. When 
they haveovertaken him, and ascertained that he was 
tbe object of pursuit, they manifest no further inter- 
est d him. 



Of late years the Bloodhound has been bred on 
more galloping lines, and Is a very much faster hound 
than he was in moss-trooping days, and his feet are 
rounder and more knuckled up. His characteristic 
head formation has boon well maintained, and the 
general average of excellence is greater than it was 
fifty years ago. Unlortuuately it has remained a 
rare breed, and is in comparatively few hands, and is 
consequently much inbred, with the natural result 
that distemper is a more dangerous disease than in 
some other breeds of hounds Out-crosses have been 
made from time to time, and have been valuable in at 
once restoring hardiness of constitution. In 1H*2 tho 
writer introduced a cross with the Southern hound. 
About 18S."> Mr. Mark Beaufoy crossed with a hound 
of French breeding, and Lieutenant-Colonel Joynson 
is experimenting with a liriffon Vendee, and Is now 
about to make his third cross. In America Mr. Lewis 
Strong Is introducing a cross of American Foxhound 
with great success, and he is also about to make his 
third cross. 

The mostsuccessful infusion of new blood, however, 
was that introduced by Mr. E. Nichols about 1H76. 
Until a comparatively short time since, each keeper 
in the New Forest was required to keep a couple of 
hounds on his walk. They called them Talbots, and 
they were evidently degenerate Bloodhounds. One 
keeper named Maynard on tbe Beaulieu walk used 
to boast that the breed had been banded down in bis 
family from father to son for more than 300 year*. 
Some fifty or sixty years ago Mr. Thomas Nevill 
Chilland, near Winchester, procured one or two 
couples of these hounds from Primer, the keeper on 
the Boldrewood walk, and from them originated a 
small pack. Mr. Nevill had a fancy to get his hounds 
as black as possible— marked like Black and Tan Ter- 
riers, in fact — and so they were at his death. Mr. 
Nevill hunted, deer, fox, hare, a tame jackal, which 
used to be bunted and then return to tbe hearthrug 
when the hunt was over — anything, in fact, for in the 
off season ho hunted water rat! 

About the time of Mr Nevill's death Nicholsbought 
a bitch named Countess from this kennel, and from 
her bred a bitch called Restless, by Mr E. Reynold's 
Ray's Victor. Restless was sent to that grand dog 
Luath XL, and produced thograndest litter of Blood- 
hounds ever bred up to that time. Mr. Nichols reared 
ten or eleven of this litter to about twelve months 
old, and then sold most of them for long prices. Un- 
fortunately some of the best of these died without 
having been exhibited; but amongst the remaining 
ones were Bravo, Lawyer, Champion, Napier and tbe 
three bitches of the litter — Belladonna, Hebe and 
Diana, all champions. The success of this out cross 
was so evident that it is impossible to Gnd a pure bred 
Bloodhound to-day without much of this blood in his 
veins. 

The antiquity of the breed and its consequent pre- 
potency makes across out a far less perilous experi- 
ment than theyoung breeder is apt to imagine. Con- 
stitution is recovered at once, and retained for seme 
generations, although the new blood soon becomes a 
negligible quantity, and whatever the breed may bo 
it must necessarily be so much newer than the Blood- 
hound that Its influence on type is very trifling, and 
is soon stamped out. 

In the seventies Lord W r olverton hunted turned out 
red deer in Dorsetshire witb a pack of Bloodhounds, 
and Whyte-Melville, in his Jiidiny Recollections, thus 
describes them: 

"Full, sonorous and musical, it is not extravagant 
to compare these deep-mouthed notes with the peal of 
an organ in a cathedral. Vet they run a tremendous 
pace. Stride, courage and condition (the last essen- 
tial requiring constant care), enable them to sustain 
such speed over the open as to make a good horse 
look foolish; whilst among enclosures they charge the 
fences in line like a squadron of heavy dragoons. 
Yet, for all this fire and mettle In chase, they are sad 
cowards under pressure from a crowd. A whip 
cracked hurriedly, a horse galloping in their track, 
even at an injudicious rate, will maketbe best of them 
shy and sulky for half the day." 

When Lord Wolverton gave them up, Lord Car- 
rington hunted them In Buckinghamshire for one 
season, and then the greater part of the pack was 
taken over by Count Le Couteulx de Canteleu. 

Tbe Bloodhound was originally ohlefiy used as a 
llmler and for man-hunting, and for these purposes be 
is far superior to any other breed of. hound, as be Is a 
natural man-hunter, is able to bunt a far colder scent 
than any other breed, and Is of all breeds the least 
liable to change. 

The late Mr. J. Nevill Fltt (one of our most reliable 
authorities) says : 

"Whether the Bloodhound can really hunt a lower 
scent than ordinary hounds will, I fancy, always be a 
moot point, there is no doubt but he has an exceed- 
ingly fine nose, and nature has endow< d him with tho 
patience to make the most of it. My own idea is that 
a Bloodhound simply hunts a colder scent than a Fox- 
hound because he takes more pains. He stoops for a 
scent when the other is driving ahead. It is like the 
quick school boy and the plodding one; they are each 
very well in their place — that of the Foxhound being 
to chase his victim to doath as quickly as possible, tho 
Bloodhound to hunt it down by patience and perse- 
verance. 

"I do not consider these good bounds for a pack, 
because each hunts for himself, and they do not look 
to and depend on each other. Moreovor, to form an 
efficient pack, hounds must at times lie taken hold of 
by the huntsman, and turned by the whip. This 
Bloodhounds do not like I heard Lord Wolverton 
say the same, and my own experience bears it out. 
They are too independent, or clever, if tho term Is 
more agreeable to their admirers; and I fiar I must 
add that cleverness is at times so gr< at as to border 
very closely on contrariness. It is not so much Inferi- 
ority of nose, as want of patience and method In using 
it, that debars most dogs, more particularly hounds, 
from hunting as cold a scent as a Bloodhound. Let 
him work and drive like the Foxhound, and he would 



10 



[January 2 19C4 



no longer bunt a man or deer hours after he had been 

* 0,, 'Mv opinion of a Bloodhound is that he is out of 
place "in a pack; but that, used as the Hon. GraDtloy 
Berkeley used Druid, either to drive game to the rifle 
or retrieve it when wounded, they are invaluable. 
Here, using only one, or a couple, as the case may be, 
their cleverness and independence has full scope; they 
can use their intellect without interference from a 
sportsman, take time to puzzle out a scent when at 
fault, and hunt after their own manner; but this is 
not what we want in a pack." ■ i. . 

The late Colonel Cowen introduced a Bloodhound 
cross iato the Braes o' Derwent Foxhounds with 
groat success, and Mr. Charles Wilson has done this 
with the Oxenholme Staghounds with gratifying 

results. _ _. . . 

In the GalUe mountains, County Tipperary, the 
Blood houDd is found to be of great service in driving 
fallow deer to the guns. These mountains are very 
thickly wooded, and deer-stalking, as id Scotland, is 
quite impracticable. Eight or ten beaters are used, 
and the rifles are posted at likely crossing places, and 
the woods beaten back wards and forwards, the deer 
generally breaking back. The keeper who hascharge 
of the Bloodhound walks on a ride in line with the 
beat, leading the hound. Directly a good buck is seen 
the hound is put on the line, still on the lead. The 
keeper carries a signal horn, with which to intimate 
to the gun* the finding of a likely deer, and then the 
interesting hound work begins, though it is no sine- 
cure for the keeper. With this method the guns are 
pretty certain of a shot before long. The hounds do 
not give tongue, except on viewing deer." 

DOING S IN DO GDOM. 

The Nevada field Trial Club's trials are off for 
good. All all events, the meeting will not be run after 
the Bakorsfield trial as was contemplated when it was 
found that the dry season would prevent the original 
runningin ParaJise valley, Humboldtcounty, Nevada. 

Rumor has it that Mr. W. J. Pegg will judge Bull- 
dogs and Ball Torriers at the W. K. C. show in 
February. Mr. Pegg it will be remembered is the 
proprietor of the Woodcote Kennels and was the 
breeder of Ch. Woodcote Wonder. He will no doubt 
draw a large entry of the two breeds mentioned. 

Jos. E. Terry's sterling English Setter Orion, the 
sire of some good dogs, served Iona S. (Lady's Count 
Gladstone-Jessie Rod field ) on the 3d and 4th insta. 

Mr. Terry also bred Lou (Orion-Mary Lou) to 
Henry Oxnard'9 Merry Monarch (Mercury-Johanna) 
November 24, 1903. 

The breedings above referred to should be pro- 
ductive of something good, the sires are proved pro- 
ducers. 

Lady, we will mention, will probably be bred to 
Kllgariff. The nick will be watched with interest. 

Al Betz's English Setterbitch Merry Heart (Merry 
Monarch-Sweetheart's Last) was served by \V. W. 
Van Arsdale's McCloud'a Boy (Tony Boy-Sadie 
Hopkins) November 25, li»ii:i. 

Henry E. Skinner's Count's Mark Jr., a handsome 
son of Mr. W. W. Van Arsdale's Count's Mam served 
November — , 1903 Mr. H. Steele's Thyra, a bitch out 
of Lady Florence by Llewellyn Drake and bred by T. 
P. McConnell, of Victoria, B. C. 

Thos. S. Griffiths writes us Irom Spokane that his 
Collie bitch Topsey (full sister to R. Miss Tuffel) Las 
recently whelped a nice litter of puppies to Imp. 
Braehead Commander, a big winner here and in 
Scotland. Litters are expected from Imp. Moreton 
Vesta, Imp. Craigmore Caroline and Spokane Lassie, 
bred to Imp. Rippowam Archer and Imp. Lenzie 
Prince. 

If all is well, Glen T^na Kennels should have a lot 
Of good yonng Collies. 

The listof judges forthe Westminster Kennel Club's 
twenty-eighth annual dog show, to be held at Madi- 
son Square Garden, New York, February 10, 11, 12 
and 13, 1904, is the following: 

Dudley E. Waters, Grand Riplds, Mich.— St. 
Bernards. 

I. Blackburn Miller, New York, N. Y.— Great 
Danes. 

John Brett, Fi3her's Island. N. Y.— Greyhounds, 
Foxhounds (Amer.), Chesapeake Bay Dogs, Pointers 
and Setters. 

Dr. S. J. Bradbury, Lynbrook, L. I. — SportiDg 

Spaniels. 

W. J. Pegg, London, Eng.— Bulldogs and Bull 

Terriers. 

Alex. L. Goode, Boston, Mass. — Boston Terriers. 

Chas D. Bernhelmer, New York, N. Y. — Poodles. 

E. Powell Jr.. Shrewsbury, Eng. — Fox Terriers and 
Wel*h Terriers. 

E. Lnster Jones, Madison, N. J. — Beagles. 

O. W I) Kiner, Rye, N. Y.— Irish Terriers. 

Dr. C E-vlog, St. Louis, Mo.— Scottish Terriers. 

Giorge Riper, Gomersal, England — Bloodhounds, 
Mastiffs, Newfoundlands, Deerhounds, Russian Wolf- 
hounds, Foxhounds (Eng.), Griffons. Retrelvers, Col- 
lies, Old English Sheepdogs, Dalmatians, Chows, 
Airedales, Buset Hounds, Dachshunde, Whippets, 
Blao'f and Tan Terriers, Skyes, Bedlingtons, Dandle 
Dinmxnis Sohlpperkes, Pugs, all Toy?, miscellaneous 
classes and unolassiG»d specials. 

James Mortimer will a< - t as Superintendent, which 
means mu^h for the ■r.sfnl handling of the show. 
The premium lists wer> i ady for mailing on the 1st. 



Duck and v ' Outfits. 

The demand at Skinner's keeps up for sportsmen's outfits 
ammunition and guns. A large and new stock of goods baa been 
added to fill tbe demand for bunting suits, rubber boon and 
hunters' footwear; canvas and folding wooden decoys, gun cases 
and a new design of leather-covered shell boxes. Peters Factory 
Loaded Shells are unequaled. Skinner's place Is 801 Market 
street. You can get anything there yon need for duck or quail 
shooting. Send for a catalogue, if you haven't tbe time to come, 
and try a mall order. a 



Hunting Jack Rabbits. 

The hunting of jack rabbits as a profession, the 
jacks so obtained being sent to the cemmon market, 
is probably as singular an occupation as exists in 
California. It is a fact not generally known that this 
business employs about 200 men, the site of their 
operations being chiefly in the two great valleys of 
the State, the Sacramento and San Joaquin, writes 
James Marqueen. 

It is in the latter county, however, that the larger 
number of these hunters hursue their calling, no less 
than sixteen of them living in and around the town of 
Modesto alone. The market for the output of these 
professionalists is San Francisco. The rabbits are 
shipped thence by express. This fact limits the 
territorial extent of the operations of these hunters 
within the State, as they cannot work at such a 
distance from San Francisco that the express charges 
on the rabbits shipped will exceed a definite rate per 
pound. The rabbits bring from $1.15 to $1.75 per 
dozen, from which the express charges and 10 per 
cent commission must be deducted. They areshipped 
in sacks, each sack containing thirty. It may be 
said, therefore, that a rabbit will bring to the hunter 
an average of 10 cents, and to earn a mil imum of $3 
a day he must shoot an average of thirty each day. 
This number, however, is greatly exceeded. A 
hunter regards himself in poor luck if he does not 
kill fifty in a day. M. B. Carter, one of the hunters 
of Modesto, together with an associate, starUd shoot- 
ing on September lstlast; up to the preseut time they 
estimate they have killed and shipped 7U00 rabbits. 
Larger aggrtgates than this are made, as in the 
recited instance the men have not been shooting 
regularly during the period named. 

The rabbit hunter is provided with a light wagon, 
on which there is built a box for the reception of his 
game; a pair of good, strong, lively horses; two dogs, 
a double-barreled fowling piece and a quantity of 
shells. Thus equipped he moves along roads and 
over fields in quest of the jacks. His animals are all 
trained to the business. As soon as his horses see a 
rabbit they stop; the hunter then shoots from the 
wagon, the horses paying absolutely no regard to the 
report of his gun. His dogs do not attempt to run 
down the rabbits that escape, unless it be such as are 
wounded; these latter they chase until the jacks are 
overcome, when they kill them and bring them to the 
wagon. Jacks are generally numerous over the areas 
traversed by the hunters; their common habitat is 
among the stubble of the old wheat or barley Melds, 
or sheltered by the bunches of tumble weed. Under 
such cover they will remain perfectly still until the 
hunter's team is closo upon them; then they will give 
a jump and a bound and be off — unless they are 
stopped by the quick and unerring aim of the hunter. 
The dogs which accompany the hunter are Setters. 
They follow the scent of the rabbit and approach him 
whore he is squatting until they are within good 
shooting distance, when they stretch in a springing 
attitude upon the ground and remain parfectly still 
until the hunter comes up, and, advancing a step or 
two in direction of the jack, jumps him from his 
cover. 

Frequently surprising shots are made. Mr. Carter 
states that he has upon several occasions killed as 
many as five jacks with a discharge of both barrels of 
his gun. Does are commonly accompanied by the 
bucks; of the latter there may be half a dozen in 
company of a single doe. This bunch of rabbits will 
move along the tracks in the wheat fields made by 
the wheels of the combined harvesters, and in these 
paths will approach a team to within shooting dit- 
tance. The experienced hunter, when he sees a 
band of rabbits approaching in this manner, quietly 
awaits until they have approached such a distance 
that they are aroused to his presence then he lifts his 
piece and fires; generally he will get the bunch. 

Rabbits have the trail of congregating in numbers 
of from ten to twenty under cover of a patch of weeds; 
one shooting at an exposed rabbit while they are so 
bunched, may unconsciously kill several, 1 e will at 
least be greatly astonished to see spring out of the 
cover a large number of frightened and active 
creatures, who show him their backs at many dif- 
ferent angles, and who bound and scamper off and in 
a moment disappear. At this juncture the hunter 
does some rapid shooting. Half a dozen or more 
shots fired In quick succession will bring the rabbits 
to the huddling position; then they will become ter- 
rorized and oourt safety in hiding. Then the hunter 
dismounts, leaving his horses to stand, and begins to 
shoot the rabbits as rapidly as his dog jumps them 
up. Bringing his bag to the wagon, he disembowels 
each rabbit, hanging its hind legs apart on hooks at 
the bao« of the box on his vehicle in order to get 
them in shape for thli operation; all of tbe game 
being so treated, he tosses them into the box, re- 
mounts and drives on, 

Every nigh', in the camp the hunter loads his shells 
in preparation for the work of next day. Houses 
brass shells, which may be reloaded ad infinitum, and 
the ammunition cost is reduoed to a minimum. It is 
tbe work of several hours to do this, so it is often late 
at night before he gets to bed. He sacks his rabbits, 
bringing sacks with him for the purpose, and ships 
them to 8an Francisco from any station on the rail- 
road which he may pasB. 

Rabbits have been, and are to-day, an awful scourge 
to the farmers of the State, and especially to those of 
these great wheat growing valleis. It is in the San 
Joaquin that the great rabbit drives occurred, 
about which so much used to be written a few years 
ago - Whole communities, driven to desperation by 
the ravages of these pests, would turn out in a grand 
countryside assemblage, and on horseback, on foot, 



in carts, buggies and wagons, they would march 
along, moving the rabbits toward a wire corral some 
miles distant, into which the pests would ultimatelv 
bo driven and killed. The presence of the hunters 
has of late years rendered rabbit drives unnecessary 
asthe animals have been kept down to a considt rable 
extent. Farmers suffer loss of grain at the present 
time, but the loss is not so great as formerly. 

It is unlikely, however, that the rabbits will ever 
be hunted out, even within the small radius of profit- 
able shipping to San Francisco. This is owing lo the 
tremendous reproductive powers of the animal 
They begin breeding in March and continue bringing 
forth unremittingly every three weeki until Septem- 
ber. Their first litters are small, being but one or 
two; but these rapidly increase in numbers until 
along in the summer they are multiplying the rabbit 
population of the valleys by from twelve to fifteen 
young at a time. The mothers. nest in old badger 
holes several feet under the ground, so they are 
secure from attack, except from gopher snakes and 
ground owls, which kill their annual quotas of these 
creatures, whose only defense is flight. A number 
are destroyed by coyotes, which, since the repeal of 
the bounty law, are again becoming numerous but 
these natural enemies are wholly unable to crpe wilb 
the prodigious increase of the jackp, and were it not 
for the human hunters few kinds of vegetation could 
be raised in some sections of the State unprotected 
by rabbit-proof fences. 

The rabbits sent to San Francisco are nearly all 
handled by one firm; it is a large commission house 
dealing in game of all kinds; they probably handle a 
million or more rabbits in a year. 

The State Game Officials are Vigilant. 

We had occasion two weeks ago to praise the Fish 
Commissioners and their corps of deputies for an un- 
precedented vigilance in the pursuit of game law 
violators, and at the same time we deprecated the 
source of many rumors to the effect that, locally at 
least, the law was fractured with an impunity that 
created much comment. 

We were correct in one assertion— that the deputy 
commissioners were (and are) keen after the very (?) 
few delinquents, foreigners generally. But to our 
utter surprise our doubts as to the sale and holding 
of illegal quantities of game and the capture of ducks 
with nets, etc., were apparently not well founded 
Within the past two weeks two arrests were made of 
dealers who had a larger number of ducks in posses- 
sion than the legal quota as well as a number of dozen 
of quail for sale. 

The first convictions for the taking of ducks with 
nets in violation of the statute was made tbis week. 
Two men, Vincent Geri and Salvatore Olievert were 
arrested by Deputies Cross and Lee under sus- 
picious circumstances. They were known to 
be net fishermen and were taken with 152 ducks 
in their possession. Their nets, (and a few fish) were 
in the boat but they had no firearms and there was 
nothing in their boat to indicate that the game had 
been shot and everything pointed to the fact that the 
birds had been captured by drowning. 

From the published statements, the fellows had a 
good case and possibly might have won out had they 
fought the charges. They were caught red-handed 
however and the practice has been so universal among 
that class that they plead guilty and were fined $25 
each. Now that the crusade has been tardily started 
it will not be much of an effort to stamp out this par- 
ticular system of game law violation. 

Two more delinquents wore taken into the toils of 
the official net for catching crabs under the legal size, 
the men wore fined $20 each. 

The crab supply of this city has now become so 
limited, as against the plenteous supply of large 
crabs in years past, that a crab eight inches in length 
is almost a rarity. The rapacity of the dealers and 
persistent fishing all the year round has decreased 
our local supply to almost nothing. 

Shipments daily by the thousand to Chicago and 
other points East is really the cause of the almost 
total decimation of the crab crop. 



Coming Events. 



April 1-Sept. 10. Oct. 18-Feb. 1— Open season for taking steel- 
nead in tidewater. 
Nov. 1-Aprll 1— Trout season closed. 
July 1-Jan. 1— Open season for blaok bass. 
Aug 15-April 1— Open season for lobsters and orawflsh. 
Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 
Sept. 1-May 1— Open season for shrimp. 
Sept. 10-Oot 18 -Close season in tidewater for steelhead. 

Nov. la-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 

water. 

aim. 

July l-Feb. IB— Dove season open. 
Nov. 1-July 15— Deer season olosed. 

Sept. l-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 
sage hen. 

Oot. 15-Feb. 15— Open season .'or quail, ducks, eto. 

Bench Shows. 

Jan. 20. 23— Toledo Fanciers' Association. Toledo, O. A. W. 
Lee, Secretary, Toledo, O 

Jan. 27, 30— National Fanciers' and Breeders' Association. 

Chicago. 

Feb 2, 7— Ohio State Poultry Association. Columbus, O. W. 
A. Lott, Secretary, Wooster, O. 

Feb. 10, 13— Westminster Kennel Club, Madison Sqaare Garden, 
New York. James Mortimer, Superintendent. 

April 7, 9— Victoria Kennel Club. Victoria, B. C. T. P. Mc- 
Connell, Secretary, Victoria, B. C. 

April-: — San Jose Kennel Club. San Jose, Cal, N. J. Stewart 
Secretary, San Jose, Cal. 

Field Trials. 

Jan. 6— Mississippi Field Trial and Gun Club. Inaugural 
trials. Holly Springs, Mies MembershiD Stake, January 8: 
Derby and All-Age Stake, January 13. W. De Arnold, Tupelo. 
Miss. 



January 2, 1904] 



@Thc *3i*cetua* nut* ^pinlsntmi 



If You Have One or More Good Horses to Sell Consign Them to the 

SECOND SPRING COMBINATION HORSE SALE OF 

J. L. HcCARTHY & SON 

IRVINGTON PARK, PORTLAND, ORE, MARCH 1, 2 and 3, 1904 
Several Consignments and Fast Record Animals Already Pledged. 

We want 200 High-Class Trotters and Pacers, with and without records, Coach, Carriage and Driving Horses. Choice 
Breeding Stock, consisting of Stallions, Brood Mares, Colts and Fillies, will also bring more money at this Sale than can be 
obtained at any other time or place, because there is a great demand in the Pacific Northwest for these classes, especially If 
they are California-bred. If you doubt these statements read the account of our last sale in the Breeder and Sportsman, April 
18, 1903, If you have a Good Horse to sell, write for Entry Blanks and full particulars at once. 

Consign Now and We will Thoroughly Advertise J. L. McCARTHT & SON, 

Your Horses for the Next Two Months. Room 8, Hamilton Bldgr, Portland. Ore. 



THE FARM. 



Improve Your Turkeys. 

Never before in the history of this 
country has there been such a scarcity of 
turkeys for Thanksgiving anil Christmas 
as has been the case this season. Never 
before has such an effort been put forth 
to secure a full supply, nor was there ever 
known before to be such a failure in 
raising them. By far the greatest danger 
we confront in growing turkeys is the 
weakness that comes from too much in- 
breeding. People throughout the country 
have neglected introducing new blood into 
tneir flocks. This must be speedily done 
in all the flocks, or turkey breeding as an 
industry will be mine 1. It is useless to 
hope to obtain new blood of a proper 
quality in one's own neighborhood. Send 
off miles and miles away across the 
country to secure new and vigorous blood. 
Many of the diseases that come to turkeys 
young and old, such as idackhead, leg 
weakness and delicate constitutions, may 
all be blamed to careless inbreeding. 
There never has been any reasonable 
excuse for this, and with the present 
opportunities for enlightenment and in- 
formation it has become more than in- 
excusable. 

The practice of selecting and selling to 
market the largest and quickest maturing 
young turkeys is the second evil in turkey 
growing that needs correction. Two year 
old hena, or rather hens in their second 
laying season, are by far the best for pro- 
ducing poults. Never keep the small or 
under-sized turkey hens. Nor is it best 
to depend too much on very large over- 
sized ones if you have them. The strong, 
vigorous, medium-sized hens in their 
second season of laying are the best that 
one can possibly have for laying the eggs 
f r .in which to produce the young turkeys. 

One-year-old toms of good size, heavy 
bones and vigorous constitutions are the 
best to select. Do not be induced to be- 
lieve that your neighbor can give you any 
relief through an interchange of toms — 
unless by ohanoe he has lately introduced 
into his flock a cross of a wild turkey torn, 
as many have done. There were at Madi- 
son Square Garden last winter a dozen or 
more young toms that had come from a 
direct cross of a wild turkey torn with 
Bronze turkey hens. These young toms 
were • tamped with the vigor and strength 
of the wild ancestor, and we know of 
some who purchased them that have been 
quite successful with turkeys the past 
season. 

Do not imagine that wild turkeys are 
less vigorous or harder to raise to maturity 
than others. It is possible to have just as 
much strength, vigor and constitution in 
the white turkeyB as in any other breed or 
variety. More" attention should be given 
to growing the black turkey, as well as to 



the Narragansett turkey. We have seen 
some flocks of buff turkeys, or rather of a 
cinnamon or reddish brown, that were 
almost as large as the bronze or Narragan- 
sett. These are said by Rhode Islanders 
to be a very steady, vigorous turkey for 
market purposes. We encourage greater 
attention being paid to the Narragansett, 
the black, the buff and the white, because 
we should like to have all the different 
breeds tried in as many localities as pos- 
sible throughout the country where tur- 
keys are grown ; so that the merit of each 
in each section may be thoroughly tested. 
No doubt some turkeys will do better in 
some localities than others will. 
The black turkey is said to be best suited 

| to a climate like Texas. The Narragan- 
sett has been most successfully grown in 

! the bleak climate of New England. The 
Bronze turkey seems to thrive better in 
some localities than others. All this 

I should be taken up and studied by the 
turkey growers throughout the United 
States and Canada. Above all things, do 
not . neglect to huntj up and find new, 
strong, iiealthy aud vigorous blood to re- 
new your flocks. In the future never 
breed close, and always select the best 
females for your own breeding stock, and 
sell the rest to market. — Country (lentle- 
man. 

The Thermometerin the Dairy. 

Of all external influences, temperature 
is the most important factor to be con- 
sidered in handling milk and milk 
products, says Inland Farmer. It works 
the most notable changes and influences 
more than any other factor the final 
quality and value of the product. 

The creamery worker and birtter-maker 
are fully aware of this fact. All their 
operations in handling milk or cream are 
gauged with the unmost accuracy by 
means of the thermometer, doing nothing 
by guess, leaving nothing to chance. 

On the farm, however, changes of tem- 
perature or condition of weather, are in 
most cases regarded with the greatest un- 
concern. And yet, the milk as produced 
on the farm is the first and most import- 
ant link in the chain of manufacturing 
processes. 

The finished product, whether that be 
cream or butter, cheese or bottled milk, 
can be no better than the milk from 
which it is made. 

Milk is without exception, the most per- 
ishable product of the farm and the dairy- 
man who handles it with that fact con- 
stantly in mind will obtain the best re- 
sults. While the dairyman who disre- 
gards it, will meet with failures and heap 
troubles upon his head. 

Sour milk is the bane of the milk ship- 
per in summer, and often the moment 
spent in taking the temperature of the 
milk before it leaves the farm, may be 
well spent. If the day is warm or sultry, 
a little study will quickly tell whether it 
is safe to ship or whether it is better to 
run the milk over the cooler a second 
time, in order to reduce the temperature 



to the point of safety. There is no possi- 
ble excuse for milk souring in transit 
during the months of December, January 
and February. Yet this happens, as we 
know, and the dairyman is never willing 
to assume the blame. 

A thermometer placed at a location 
with favorable light either in the dairy- 
room or on the porch of the residence or 
in the barn, may be consulted in passing 
by, without even stopping. 

It is a good habit, that of reading the 
thermometer. One to be cultivated by a 
man w^o makes the production of milk 
his business, and handles it every day in 
the year. He should at all times consult 
the thermometer as a guide to his opera- 
tions. The condition of the weather and 
temperature of the air exert a combined 
influence on the condition of the milk. 
The man who habitually looks into the 
little things, the details of his business, 
observes these influences and adjusts his 
operations accordingly. He asks and 
answers these questions from day to day. 

At what temperature, varying, of course, 
witli the seasons, is it safe to ship my 
milk? How effective is my cooler in re- 
ducing the temperature of the milk from 
blood heat to that temperature? What 
is the difference of temperature between 
the air and the shipped milk? How long 
is my milk in transit? And must I not 
take greater precautions against souring 
on a long than on a short haul? 



Farm Notes. 



The exports of cattle, hogs and sbeep 
for the first eleven months of L$X)3 were 
$33,022,000 against $22,000,000 for the 
corresponding months of last year- 

The exports of breadstuff for the 
eleven months of this year eDdiDg with 
November were $11 760,000, an increase 
of $8,000,000 over the corresponding 
months of last year. 

A farmer who plans to grow several 
crops each season is more apt to succeed 
than the one who devoteB his whole time 
I to one crop. If he knows how to grow 
only one crop, he had better learn to 
plant others. 

One reason tools' do not give good 
satisfaction and wear out soon, Is that 
they are not good to begin with. Buy 
only the best, and take the best of oare 
of them, and keep them sharp and 
under shelter. 

California raisin crop last year was 
110,000,000 pounds. The State practi- 
cally supplies the country with raisins. 
We imported last year about 0,000,000 
pounds ef raisins, but exported almost 
an equal quantity. 

A man who has boon active and in- 
dustrious all of bis life will find it more 
difficult to stop than to keep on with 
his work. The time never comes when 
he wants to sit around and do nothing. 
When be stops work he falls off in 
weight and his appetito fails. 

The general principles in farming are 
the same as In selling dry goods, gro- 



ceries, or anything else. These are, a 
knowledge of what the market needs, 
when it wants it, and furnishing it at 
that time, in such quantities and at such 
prices that the consumer will buy it. 

During the last fiscal year 1,720,100 
doses of blackleg vaccine were distributed 
among cattle growers. The Bureau of 
Animal Industry is publishing a table 
which shows that of the animals vaccin- 
ated, which were not already in a practi- 
cally dying condition, only about half of 
one per cent died. 

When ground is so uneven that it 
washej badly it should be terraced. The 
Agricultural Department has a bulletin 
on ditches and ditching which may be had 
upon application. The sheet-water sys- 
tem is practiced by some. Where fields 
are very hilly, something needs to be 
done, or they will run down the hill and 
into the creek. 

The seed investigation of the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture^ have shown that 
large quantities of trefoil and other prac- 
tically worthless seed are bsing imported 
for the adulteration of alfalfa and other 
seeds. About 450,000 pounds of Canadian 
blue grassseed are imported, the chief use 
of which is to adulterate the higher priced 
Kentucky blue grass seed. 

A report is now in course of preparation 
by the Department of Agriculture on 
various tobacco diseases. Tobacco experts 
have been studying the subject for up- 
wards of a year, and besides laboratery 
work, an expert [of the Department, Dr. 
McKenney, has visited the principle to- 
bacco growing areas and studied the dis- 
tribution and behavior of the diseases in 
ttie field 



Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle 
the feet 



RACI NG 




Every Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE. 

New California Jorier flab 
INGLESIDE TRACK 

COMMENCING DECEMBER 14, 

SIX OR MORE RACES DAILY 

HACKS START AT Z P. M. SHARP. 

Reached by street cars from any part of the 
city. 

Train leaves Third and Townsend at 1:15 p. m., 
and leaven the track Immediately after the last 
race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAM?, PreOdeot. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



12 



[January 2, 1904 



The Joy of Knowing. 

[Breeders Gazette] 

There was a day when the farm was a 
little world. The farmer did it all, knew 
it all. He sold little, he bought little. His 
men were paid in kind. A day's work was 
exchanged for a bushel of wheat. If the 
farmer owned his soil he could hardly fail 
to live well. He could even make money 
if he had the advantage of living close to 
cities. There were no railways. The 
prairies and the deserts were untamed. 
The farmer then did not know how badly 
he did things Henad not found out how 
costly many of his practices were. His 
cattle were fed and fattened when four to 
six years old. His wethers must be four 
years old. There was even a "four-year- 
old" club in England, the purpose of 
which was to maintain the practice of 
eating only four-vear-old mutton. Rota- 
tion <>f cn>ps was little practiced. Fertil- 
ity was maintained, if at all, by careful 
savin* of manures. In that point our 
fathers were often better than their sons. 

While the old-fashioned farmer sold 
little he al«o bought little. He did not go 
into the markets for feeding cattle or 
sheep. Undid not go on the market for 
foodstuffs and fertilizers. He kept cows, 
the maids milked and made butter, the 
calves were grown on the place; they were 
finally fattened and sold. The farmer did 
not dream of shipping them to market 
himself. He did not much watch markets. 
He knew little about sources of supply in 
feeding cattle or sheep or as to ages more 
profitable to buy. There was then much 
less need that the farmer shou d be an 
educated business man. There was need 
that he should be economical, saving, 
skilled in all manner of trades and arts, 
for he made bis own tools, soap, shingles, 
candles, clothes, houses. He was a car- 
penter, builder, skilled axeman, swung 
the scythe and cradle, half-soled his own 
boots. 

The schools were ruder then. The 
farmer'sson worked uiorningand evening, 
going generally late to school, learned to 
read, spell, cypher, a little of geography. 
What he learnfd did not wean him away 
from the eoil, he read steady-going papers 
by the fire of winter's evenings and good 
old-fashioned books. To day the whole 
system of schooling is changed. Bovs are 
pushed faster. They know as much at 
ten as we did at fifteen. There is no 
longer any time for them to do work on 
fie farm before or after school houre. 
They bring their books home from school. 
They get little thus far in their books to 
lead them to think of the farm or of agri- 
culture. We will not say that modern 
school systems are inferior to the old but 
we do believe there is too much divorcing 
of brain work, study and hand work. 
Bo} s are best off when thev have plenty 
of actual contact wiih the soil and the 
real work of the farm in connection with 
all the schooling you care to give. We 
are not giving too much education to our 
boys so much as we are neglecting to give 
them the [right kind. Mathematics will 
not hurt, but will help. Languages will 
help if they do not take too much time. 
Chemistry is the foundation of all science 
the boy cannot do without that. Geology 
helps. Botany helps. All these and 
other things but lay broad the foundation 
for a profitable agricultural education and 
make a man able to understand and appre- 
ciate this world of which he is a part- 
The life is more than the meat. 

The tendency of modern agriculture, 
with its machinery and horse power, en- 
abling men to reap wide fields, is essen- 
tially destructive. There is great need of 
Scientific and practical teachings of soils 
and maintaining and restoring fertility to 
them. You cannot learn that of the 
farmer practicing his art i u the prairies 
to-day lie is a soil-robber, and wisely 
enofigh ; for all poineers must be soil 
robbers. Theyoung generation of farmers 
must cease to be soil-robbers. The farmer 
is a business man. He must know with 
definiteness and skill many things. He 



must know how wisely to choose cattle 
for feeding, to buy feedstuffs wisely for 
them, to feed them economically. Thanks 
to modern methods practical men, skilled 
in these arts, are now to be found in our 
agricultural colleges. 

Agricultural education pays well in the 
joy that it brings the young farmer. The 
common processes of the art take on a 
new meaning. As he plows, instead of 
turning up a dead soil he is turning up 
the history of the world since the very 
rocks cooled. He is thinking of the 
chemistry of that soil and of.the problems 
concerning it and its productiveness; 
problems that neither he nor his eons 
will find all settled. It is nowhere a dead 
world to him but a source of thought and 
pleasure everywhere. He will do things 
better, he will make more money for his 
training, but what is as important he 
will take a new interest and pleasure in 
doing things. 

If the boy has no land even then the 
agricultural education is most useful to 
him. Thousands of wealthy men are 
wise enough to be acquiring landed 
estates. Most of them desire to live upon 
them at least a part of the time. They 
are searching for men who know how to 
manage these estates. They are willing 
to pay generously for trained young men 
who can grow crops and care for cows and 
feed cattle and do these things well. 
They want the young men who know how. 
There are not nearly enough trained young 
men to do this work. Very often we re- 
ceive letters from rich men who are seek- 
ing for these young men who know how 
to do things. To the young man, there- 
fore, who has time and strength we would 
say take the regular course in agriculture. 
To the man who can not spare the time 
we would say take the short course and 
keep up your reading and study at home. 
A half-loaf may not satisfy your hunger, 
but it may cause you to hunt up the other 
half o: the loaf and devour it at your 
leisure. 

Why Some Breeders Fail. 

Many breeders go into improved live 
stock and fail simply because they "hide 
their light under a bushel." They buy 
the best, they care for it well, they use 
judgment in breeding and the produce 
good stock, but they lose sight of the 
most important part of the business, 
profitable prices, says National Stock- 
man. A farm loaded with the best live 
stock in the world would be an expensive 
luxury to the owner if he were not able 
to get better prices than the man who 
produced common stock. For the butcher 
grade stock is sometimes as good as if 
not better than pure-bred stock and the 
producer of pedigreed animals should al- 
ways cater to the breeder mstecd of the 
consumer. 

There is but one way to create a trade 
among the class of buyers that are willing 
to pay high enough prices to justify the 
careful breeder. It can only be done by 
advertising. This may be done by ex- 
hibiting at fairs or shows, by a liberal use 
of catalogues and circulars, or by placing 
an advertisement in a good, reliable live 
stock and farm paper. The experience of 
the most successful breeders proves be- 
yond a doubt that the latter is the most 
successful method Papers that are al- 
ways advocating improved live stock have 
done more to distribute good breeds 
throughout the country than all other 
mediums combined. They enthuse the 
man who has been contented with scrubs 
to try something better. They encourage 
the man who has taken a step higher. 
They disseminate knowledge along the 
line of improvement among ordinary 
farmers until they are convinced that it 
pays to get out of the old ruts, thus creat- 
ing a demand. 

Lack of enthusiasm and interest in good 
stock is often due to the breeders them- 
selves. Liberal prices are paid for good 
blood and good animals. Neighbors watch 
the outcome. They figure the investment 
and the result. If the prices received are 



not proportionately higher than common 
stock ai the prices paid they figure that 
another good man has gone wrong. And 
their conclusions are about right The 
man who pays good prices for good live 
stock for breeding purposes should get 
much better prices for what he produces 
than the man who is satisfied with scrubs. 
This can be done by creating a market in 
the way of letting others know what you 
have by thoroughly and persietently ad- 
vertising. 

The Yearling. 



Feeders of baby beef, who keep their 
animals up to their work, are known to 
make a gain of over two pounds daily for 
twelve months. This gain depends upon 
the age of the animal and the manner in 
which it is fed. A matter that should not 
be overlooked by the farmer is the ap- 
propriate food for each animal ; he should 
aim to increase the weight by making the 
animal as fat as possible, as fat is more 
easily produced on an animal than either 
lean meat or bone, says The Epitomixt. 
It has been shown that to increase the ex- 
cess of either fat or lean on an animal de- 
pends upon the age. The natural inclina- 
tion of a yearling animal is growth, and 
the system demands materials containing 
but a small portion of fat producing 
qualities ; but as growth adds to weight, 
the more rapid the growth the greater 
the increase in weight, which, of course, 
accounts for the quick gains made by 
young animals as compared with those 
approaching maturity, and which fact 
gives rise to the claim that baby beef is 
the cheaper form of the two. 

To know the breeds and how to use 
them ; to be aware of the fact that some 
breeds assimilate more food and give off 
less waste than others, and to learn how 
to convert food into a salable product 
quickly and economically is what each 
one must study out for himself. Have a 
piir of scales, weigh frequently and note 
the ratio of increase in weight By so 
doing one can cover the causes of failure 
and correct mistakes. The time is com- 
ing when the farmer will not be satisfied 
with less than a pound a day from birth 
for his two year old steers, nor less than 
a pound a day for his farrows and wethers 
up to one year old. In approaching 
maturity, gains are not so great, but pre 
vious to that animals for the block should j 
be pushed. Finally, breeds that gain 
weight in the high-priced portions of the 
carcass must be given preference, and 
feeders must know that they are breeding 
for definite results. Baby beef must have 
the fat in the right place. 



that it costs less to run the machine acd 
the further reason that the capacity for 
digestion and assimilation is greater in 
the young animal than in the one more 
mature. 

Bear in mind now if you are feeding 
your pigs with a scoop shovel, feeding 
them on grain that has a value, that the 
younger you can fit them for a profitable 
market without impairing their health by 
over-forcing the more money you are going 
to make out of them. This applies to 
hogs to be fitted for the market. It does 
not apply to animals intended for breed- 
ing purposes These should never be 
pushed or forced but grown with the idea 
not of making the greatest number of 
pounds per day at the least cost, but of 
developing an animal with the most per- 
fect health and most abounding vitality. 

Nor does this rule apply to animals, as 
we have before pointed out, that are kept 
for scavenger purposes in other words, 
not fed with a scoop shovel out of the oats 
bin or corn crib, but hogs that are used 
for consuming the offal of the dairy and 
of the feed yard or for turning c'over, 
rape or alfalfa pastures into cash. We 
can afford to waste feed on them because 
the food in itself is largely waste, and it 
is better to get something out of it than 
nothing, and the hog can be U6ed very 
generally for that kind of work. When 
this hog is to be fattened, then he should 
be pushed as rapidly as possible, for the 
fewer days it requires to add 50 or 100 
pounds to his weight the lees food is 
wasted in running the machine. 

We think now we have made this per- 
fectly clear to any man who will take the 
pains to read carefully and think over 
what we have said in this and three or 
four preceding articles. 



The Cost of Pork at Different Ages. 



Still harping on the same thing, ham- 
mering away on the same nail, we give 
our readers some of the conclusions drawn 
by the Wisconsin Station as a result of a 
series of careful experiments as to the 
average net gains of pigs at different ages 
and the average cost per 100 pounds of 
grain, says Wallace's Farmer. The gain 
for the first four weens on the litters of 
twelve broodeows of different breeds was 
8.8 pounds and the cost $1 17 per 100 
pounds ; the second four weeks the gain 
increased to 12.6 pounds and the cost to 
$1.71 ; the third four weeks the gain in- 
creased to 21.4 pounds and the cost to 
$2.06; the next four weeks for some reason 
the gain dropped a little to 20 pounds, 
but the cost of the gain was $2.74 per 100 
pounds ; the fifth four weeks the gain was 
23 3 pounds and the cost $3.34; the sixth 
four weeks the gain was 29.1 pounds and 
the cost $3 19; the seventh four weeks the 
gain was 23.3 pounds aud the cost $3.95; 
and the eighth four weeks the gain was 
32.4 pounds and the cost $4.29. 

This illustrates in a very striking way 
the correctness of our teachings on this 
subject for some weeks past. The older 
and larger the hogs the greater the cost 
per pound of gain. The younger and 
smaller the hog, the greater the increase 
on a given amount of feed for the reason 



Measured By Years 




KENDALL'S SPAVIN CURE has: I • , !i I c.uild to be 
the best for Spavins, Ringbones. Curbs, Splints and 
all forma of Lameness. 

Parkersbure, W. Va., Dec. 2, 1902. 
Cor. 3rd and Juliana Sta, 
DR. B. J. Kendall Co.. ■ . : . 

Gentlemen i—lMeasesend me one of your books. I 
have used Kendall's Spavin Cure lor years and I 
consider It the best le,er used. 1 had one of your 
books "A Treatise on the Horse and bis Diseases," 
but lost it and 1 am lost without it. 

Very truly yours, ARCHIE JOHNSTON. 

Prlee, til six for $5. A*k your druggist for 
KENDALL'S SPAVIN CURE, also "A Treatise on the 
Horse," the book free, or address 
DR. B. J. KENDALL CO., ENOSBURC FALLS. VT. 



FOR SALE. 

\IY ENTIRE STOCK OF STANDARD-BRED 
Al Troti log and Pacing Horses. Single drivers 
and double teams. Some excellent prospects tor 
Ktake winners entered in the Ocoident, Stanford 
and Breeders Futurity stakes. The great brood 
mare Daisys, (dam of Tom Smith 2:13^- General 
Vallejo 2:20*, Sweet Rose 2:28 (trial 2:21) and 
Little Mac (3) 2:27). The driving horses and colts 
can be seen at my stable In Vallejo, and the 
broodmares, etc . at the raoe track. Apply to or 
address THOMAS SMITH, Vallejo. Cal. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a thoroughly oom- 
O petent and reliable trainer and developer of 
speed, who is thorough master of his profession; 
best of Coast and Eastern references. Address 
TRAINER, 1531 E street, Sacramento, Cal. 




BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOLSTEINS— Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-jr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.olds; 21 Jerseys and Durham* 
competing. 5th year my Holstelns have beaten 
Jerseys for batter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burke, 80 Montgomery St., 8. F. 

JERSEYS, HOI. ST K I N8 AND DURHAMS. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1878. William Nlles & Co.. Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



AYRSHXBJgg— Young Balls, Cows and Heifer*. 
Rejrtsrtered. _From prliewlnnlnc families. Bron 
* Brandon 



Petal am a Cal. 



January 2, 1904] 



The Value of Cows According to 
Capacity. 



Prof. A. M. Wheaton furnishes some 
very interesting figures based upon pres- 
ent prices of dairy products, which mav 
be of interest to many in determining just 
where they stand in cow wealth. It will 
be noticeable that while the cow that 
makes 900 pounds of butter is valued at a 
little over $2 for every pound the o:ie 
that makes 325 is put down at leesthnn 
ten cents a pound for what she produce e, 
showing that the extra pounds are what 
count. 

Cows that make 300 lbs. of butter or 
less, beef value — 
Cows that make 325 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 350 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 375 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 400 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 425 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 450 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 475 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 500 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 550 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 600 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make t>50 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 700 lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 750 lbs of butter 
Cows that make S00 lbs. of butler 
Cows that make S-M) lbs. of butter 
Cows that make 900 lbs. of butter 
o 

The experts have figured out that 
twenty per cent of the total product of 
butter is hist by the old gravity process. 
The loss on one good cow during a year 
would be 22}.j pounds of butter and on ten 
cows 125 pounds which at twenty cents a 
pound would be $45 a year. It will be 
seen by this that the loss to the farmers 
who cream their own milk by a gravity 
process is enormous in the aggregate. 
How can any business man succeed and 
suffer such a percentage of loss? What 
would be thought of a man who would go 
on from year to year with a hole in his 
pocket through which twenty cents would 
drop out and be lost every time he put a 
dollar into his pocket? Some men try to 
console themselves by saying that it is 
not all Jost— the calves and pies get the 
butter. But this is poor consolation, fcr 
butter is dear feed, even when the price 
is the lowest. One cent's worth of oil- 
meal will do the calves and pigs as much 
good as a pound of butter fat. 



ro 

35 
40 
50 
65 
S5 
110 
130 
200 
275 
375 
500 
650 
825 
1,400 
2,000 




All Druggists and Harness 
Dealers or Vita Oil Co., 

1533 Buchanan St. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

J, A. McKerron and J. O'Kane, Agts 



CALIFORNIA 

Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
Iir 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 
Artistic Desl ruing. 
SOB Mlaalon St.. cor. First, San Fran die*. 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type mitten 
Ready lor framing 
Write for prieea. 

Bhisdsr aitd SpoBTiMAH, IS Qoary Straen. 
* San Francisco. Cal. 




$100 Reward 

For Ir>ni years we have offered 
to pay this amount for any 
c.iso of Lameness. Curb. 
Splint, ContractedCord, 
Colic, Distemper, etc., 
w hich cannot be cured by 

Turtles 

L/ 1 1 A 11 

Wo havo never been obliucd to pay the re- 
ward for obvious reasons. It's Inf.illiblo in all 
cases of Thrush, Cr&cked t*r\d Grease 
Keel and all forms of Lameness. 
Tutfle's America.™ Condition. Powders 
—a specific fwlnipure Wood ami all dlteur* arising thae- 
from. Tones up and invigorates the entire system. 

Tvjl.le-s Family Elixir ^ffffS^i 

ser ! a sample frrt f -r Ac In itaim>s, merely top«v r>*t»jf*. 

Send at once fur our 1 AO- page book "Veterinary E» peri- 
en. c," which we mai 1 free. 

TstUc , iEliiirCa.,sJ70'FsrrtllSl..SsaFrsaclsco,Cal. 

B»-«r» of SMSM nilTll — ■ ISBSSSi hat Tnlllr'a. 

Ato'*»1I Ulsters: they offer only temporary relief. If any. 



SIDNEY DILLON 23157 

SANTA ROSA STOCK FARM 

SANTA ROSA, I'AI.. 



SIDNEY DILLON was sired by Sidney 
!:I9V: dam Venus (dam of Adonis 2:lis 
Lean *«4i«, Cupid S:l(j and Juno, the dam of 
Mercury *:<l and Ida 2:30) by Venture l:27\«\ 
sire of dam of Directum ♦a'>4 SIDNEY 
DILLON" Is a model of v tnwolrv * ml 
parts his (rrand Indlvldunlffy. Inherent speed 
and excellent disposition to all his progeny 

Terms for the Season, $100, 

Only a limited number of approved mares 
taken. Usual return privilege In case horn- 
Is sold service fee will be returned If mnres 
have not proven In foal. Season ends July 
I, 1WM. Pasturage *l per month. Best of 
care taken of mares, but no responsibility 
assumed for arrldents or escapes For par- 
ticulars regarding shlpneUot mares, etc , 
address FRANK TCBHKB, 

Supt. Santa Rosa Stock Farm, 
Santa Rosa, Cal 
Or IRA FIERCE, 728 Montgomery St., S. F 



FOR SALE. 
THOROUGHBRED YEARLING COLTS 

ByjUl'CAT, out of Strongbrrd M in ■ 

ALSO 

TROTTING BRED 

YOUNG STALLIONS AND FILLIES 

TROTTERS AND PACERS. 

'PHE SIRES OF THESE COLTS ARE DIABLO, 
NutwooC Wilkes, Monbells, Cupid and Sidney 
Dillon. The sires of their first, second and third 
dams are Guy Wilkes, Hock Wilkes, Director, 
Harold, Electioneer, Cornelius. Paul's Abdallah, 
Venture, Lodi and St. Clair. All of these sires 
trace in the male line to Hambletinlan 10 lb. ough 
his best producing male descendants, excepting 
the thoroughbreds Venture and Lodi and the 
pacer St. Clair. 

C. E. FARNUM, M. D. 
305 Parrott Building. 

FOR SALE. 

'T'HE BEST UNMARKED PACER IN CALI- 
1 fornia. Handsome as a picture: can be driven 
by a woman, and is sound, kind and gentle He 
Is a bay gelding, coming six years old, with small 
star and near front foot and ankle and both hind 
ankles white. Stands 16 hands high and weighs 
about 1100 pounds. Is the best bargain in Cali- 
fornia for the price asked. Has worked miles in 
2.12 and 2:13. For price and other particulars 
address OWNER, care Brp.eder and Sports- 
mas, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 

Three Standard-Bred Trotting Stallions 

WILKES STOCK. 

One Seal Brown, 16 hands, fealed May 2, 1898; 

first dam Fearless by Fallis 4781 (record 2:23); 

second dam Jean Perault by Signal 3327. 
One Golden Kay, 16.1 bands, foaled March 5, 1898; 

first dam Signal by Del Sur 1098 (record 2:24), 

dam of Guy Line 2:29J£; second dam Lady Sigi 

na) by Signal 3327. 
One Brown, white points, 16.1 hands, foaled April, 

1899; full brother to the bay. 
These colts are all sired by Prince Alrlee 28045, 
son of Guy Wilkes 2807 (record 2:I5W), and bred by 
Wm. Corbltt, San Mateo, Cal. They are pure 
galted and show wonderful speed for the little 
wot k they have done. 
For further particulars apply to 

P H. McKVOY. Menlo Park, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

T> LACK TROTTING M ARE, RECORD 8:18*; 

standard bred; sound: nearly 16 hands high; 
weighs about 1100 pounds. Gentle and a high- 
class rosd mare (Jan be l>ought cheap. To see 
the mare and for particulars call or address 
Telephone: Pine 1786 J. W. ZIBHELL, 

3-15 Twentieth Ave , San Francisco. 



WANTED 
RHODE ISLAND REDS 

If any breeder In this State has thoroughbred 
chickens of the Bbove variety they will please 
communicate with the undersigned. 

LEWIS A. SAGE. 

SARATOGA. CAL. 



J. W. Zibbell's Training Stables 

Corner Point Lohos Road and 2(Hh Avenue 
San Francisco. 

"[TORSES TRAINED FOR TRACK OR ROAD 
11 and satisfaction guaranteed. Terms reason- 
able. Horses bought and sold. 'Phone Pine 1788 




Percheron and Belgian Stallions. 



THE FARMER'S SUPPLY OF 
THE MIDDLE V EST 

Cedar Rapids Iowa) J.nk Farm. 

, Thre | Importations this season of prlze-wlnnlng Percherons, Belgians and German Coa. bers and 
i.atalan Spanish and Majorca Jacks. I have the largest Draft and Coach Horses In America, and 
will sell more quality for the money than yau oan find anywhere Come and soe for yourxelf 

W. Li !>«■ now 



NEW MODEL 
1903 




y^, TRACK SULKIES 

AND 

BEST ROAD CART MADE, 

O'BRIEN & SONS 

Cor. Golden Gate Ave. and Polk St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



Dillon Stock For Sale 

llAlQV HI! I flN brown Ally, foaled May 
UttlOI LMLLUIl, in 1903, at Santa Rosa 
Slock Farm, sired by Sidney Dillon, sire of Lou 
Dillon, 1:58V,. First dam Paceta 2:26 by Lone 
Pine 2:285f (Son of Electioneer); second dam Ceta 
by Piedmont 2: third dam Cecil by Gen BeL- 
ton 2:34!4: fourth dam Cuba by Imp Australian, 
etc. DAISY DILLON is a beautiful (Illy and a 
grand prospect for some one Fine disposition, 
well developed, and shows she Is bred to win. 

I will sell her dam PACETA also. She Is the 
Acme of Palo Breeding Both dam and Ally must 
be seen to be appreciated. I am offer'ng tbem for 
sale as I will not have the time to devote to them 
that they should have. Paceta was stinted to 
Sidney Dillon again Mav 20th. Address. T. H. S., 
care or Breeder and Sportsman, 36 Geary St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



ake your 
horses happy by pro-"" 
viding them with 

Pure-Salt Bricks! 

Warranted to contain 
nothing but refined dairy 
salt. * A great modern conve- 
nience at a cost of about 5 cents . ^ 
^^^^^^rper horse per 



Belmont 
Stable Supply Co" 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 




IN C 



C ATTlE WDlTRv ftTTiNg 



WIRE** IRON 



19 FR,EMONT|ST..SAH FRANCISCO 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal, 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
aterclal school oa the Pacific Coast. 20.000 gradu 
stea: 10 teaabera: 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed In positions. Send for catalogs*. 



K. P. HRALD. President. 



SITUATION WANTED 

\S TRAINER AND RACE DRIVER, BY A 
•a thoroughly competent man, from the East, 
with eiperience First class references as to 
ability and character. Address T. HARRIS, 
ears of West Ranch, Fernando, Cal. 

ANTED — SITUATION AS MANAGER OF 
small Stock Farm. Thoroughly competent 
and trustworthy young man. Best of references. 
Address J R M., care Breeder and Sportsman, 
36 Geary Street, Ban Francisco. 



w 



ROSE DALE STOCK FARM 

SANTA ROSA, ( A 1. 
Home or Daly 2:15, Washington Mc- 
Klnneyand St. Whips 2:31, 

faa9 for SALE some broodmares, yearlings, hj 
Washington McKlnney. Good prospects for 1804 
and roadsters. 





For sale by Mack & Co.. Lanjlev.t Michaels Co , 
Redineton & Co , J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco. 



TALES OF THE TURF 

718 Pages of Horse. 

Two Volumes of 

FACTS - FICTION - FUN 

Vol I — FA8IGS Contains .7 stories written 
by William B. Fash;, and a Memoir. 214 
pages. Cloth. 

Vol.2 —WET SUNDAY8. provides samples of 
racing from the Grand Circuit to the bushes, 
a peep at the gallopers and quarter horses, Bnd 
the horse trader. Illustrated by Whitney 404 
pages. Cloth. 
Price of each volume, 92 OO, or the two In one 

order, 93 SO, all charges prepaid. Address 

Breeder and Sportsman, 

36 Geary St , SAN FRANCISCO, Cal. 



VETERINARY. 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Turin 

iNriRMART AND RHHI DENCB— 8 1 1 Howard S» : 
between Fourth and Fifth Sts.,San Francisco, 
Telephone: Main 457. 

Ira Barker Dalziei 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage, Saddle and Roar* Homes for Sale 

Office and stable: HOB Golden Oate Avenue, Sao 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South fftl 

X>r. W rxx, 37". U gan. 

M. R. O. V. S., F. E. T. M. S. 
VETERINARY 8VKOKON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnburg 
Veterinary Modlcal Society; Graduate <.f the New 
Veterinary College Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 

£eon to the 8. F. Fire Department: Live Stock 
ispsctor forNew Zealand and AustrallanColonlea 
at the port of San Franolsco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex President nt 
the California Stats Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Franolsco Veterlnsry Hospital, 1117 Qoldsn 
Gats Arenas, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone West 121. 



14 



©he grccbev cm*, gkpevtaman 



[January 2, 1904 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of Jobh Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney-Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEALYi Manager. 




Dictatus Medium 32493 

Will make the coming seaion at 

Race Track, Holiister, Cal. 



Jos Sanchez In charge 

$40 FOR THE SEASON. 

Payable at time of service, with usual return "privilege. 
Everv care taken to prevent accidents, bat do responsibil- 
ity should any occur Prompt and careful attention In all 
cases Pasturage furnished to mares sent from a distance 
at $2 50 a month. 

A DICTATUS MEDIUM Pl'KSE OF SIOO. 
I will give a purse of $100, with entrance money added 
for a race, best two in three, open to any and all colts from 
DICT ATI'S M EDIUM. the result of the breeding season of IU04, either pacers or trotters Must be 
three to start and race to come off on Holiister traok. Fair week, 1M07 (Exact date to be hereafter 
announced ) *5 entrance money, payable June I. 1905. IS thirty days before the race. Three 
moneys: 60 per cent to llrst horse; 30 per cent to second and 10 per cent to ilMrt, nrttttt par- 
ticulars, address . „. «*• 1 I-ATHKOI , Holiister. 

DESCRIPTION. 

DICTATU8 MEDIUM Is « years old, weighs 1220 pounds. A beautiful turned bay horse with 
heavy mane and tall, kind and gentle, with a perfeot disposition. Good Hat heavy bone. He has 
great power an.l speed. Has a rooord of fcM, but has worked out in 2:12. He is a horse that will go 
out any day and do his best. His colts are models of grace and beauty. Only one so far has been 
worked. This one, Al Willson s yearling LITTLE MEDIUM, paced an exhibition H mile on the 
Holiister Race Track in 384 seconds, a 2:33 gait. This colt has groat promise. 

DICTATI'S MEDIUM is by Dlrtatns 2:17. one of the best bred and fastest horses ever brought to 
California. The dam of Dictatus Medium Is Belle Medium (dam of Stain B. 2MH). by Happy 
Medium, grandslreof the dam or Lou Dillon 1:58!4. His second dam is Argenta by Almont Light- 
ning, sire of the dam or Zombro 2:11. There is no doubt but Dictatus Medium will prove to be a sire 
or speed as well as good size, style and disposition. 



Speed, Breeding and Individuality 



RITA H. 2:11 1-4 

Pacing Mare by McKinney 2:11 1-4 

ELECTRO McKINNEY 

Brown Colt, Three-Year-Old Trotter by McKinney 2:11 1-4 

RITA H. is a dark brown mare who stands nearly 16 bands high, and will weigh in racing trim 
about 1050 lbs This mare has had this year a very remarkable record. She started In the North- 
western Clroult in the States or Oregon and Washington, and out or eight s'arts won her first seven 
raoes and only lost four heats during the entire clroult. and has a pacing record or 2:11 H- The mare 
Is five years old and Is excellent on the road She does not pull or lug. and a lady can drive her 
anywhere. Last spring she trotted a workout mile In 2:18^ and repeated in 2-i<;-,. after only seven 
weeks' work. Her owner has driven her in 2: 12^4 in the Los Angeles Driving Club races, she having 
won all or them In which she started. This mare can step two heats below 2:10. 

ELECTRO McKINNEY Is a brown stallion foaled In 1900, and stands 15 hands 1 Inch In height. 
He trotted a lull mile as a two-year-old in 2:31 \4, last quarter In 35 seconds, and when a three-year- 
old a full mile In 2:21 'i, last quarter in 32 seconds He is perfectly patted and a grand individual In 
every respect. Weighs about 950 lbs. ELECTRO McKINNEY is bred In the purple, and Is one of 
the best sons of McKinney alive to-day. McKinney Is undoubtedly the greatest sire lor his age, 
living or dead. ELECTRO McKINNEY was not raced this year, being only a three-year-old and 
sot entered in any stakes it was decided to hold him over. 

These horses arc all right and there is not a thing the matter with them, but my business 
demands are such that I cannot afford to devote any time to racing them. For prices and rurther 
particulars address 

BYRON ERKENBRECHER. 

8*1 OUBRIKB lit II. DING, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Or Inquire at Ottlce of MKEKOKK AND SPORTSMAN 



A Sidney Stallion With Earning Capacity 

SALE. 



In pursuance of my intention to retire from the business of breeding; horsee, 
and having- disposed of all my broodmares at auction, I now offer at private sale 
the stallion 

William Harold 2:i3i-4. 

His sire is the great Sidney 2;19j, grandsire of the champion trotter of tho 
world, Lou Dillon 1 :58A, and his dam the great race and broodmare Cricket 2:10 
(dam of four in the list) by Steinway, the greatest son of Strathmore. 

WILLIAM HAROLD is a producer The only two of his get to start are 
that wonderfully fa9t trotter Janice 2:08\ and the pacor Dan Burns 2:15. 
WILLIAM HAROLD'S services in the stud were very limited up to three years 
ago, as he was raced. His weanlings, yearlings and two-year-olds are very prom- 
ising and have size, good looks and great natural speed, besides being uniform in 
color, nearly all bays. He is a sure foal getter, is in the very best condition, sound 
and healthy, and with ordinary good business management can earn in the stud 
in 1U04 the price asked for him. 

For tabulated pedigree and full particulars, address 

H. W. MEEK, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



CURBS, SPLINTS, SPAVINS, WINDPUFFS, 



k *S>v — and all enlargements, absolutely removed by— 

LAME^ ^QUINN'S 



HORSES 



Ointment. 

It has the unqualified endorsement of our leadr 
imj horsemen and veterinarians* 

MB. C. H. DlNEBART, Caehier .Stare Banl; 
» Slayt-tn, Minn.. any* : 

"On» bottlo cured a vt*ry bad case of blood spavin 
on a mare fur which I have since been offered ftdOU. 
I would not be without it if it cost $i>.uu a bottle.** 
We hare h. tdredt of such tcmtimonial: 

Price ** | .00 prr imrknsi-. A-k your Dmjrpist for it. If 
he due- nut keep it, w will r-end prepaid mi receipt of price. 

-\ It I A < O , \\ hit, hull. V Y. 

'"ri^r* ^r* ** ** ** * * ** - *nnr ■ " . rw'iHryyyyirryyir.r^ 



ConeylslandJockeyClub 



RACE COURSE: 

Sheepshead Bay, N. Y. 



OFFICE: Windsor Arcade, 
571 Fifth Ave., New York 



EVENTS TO CLOSE 

Monday, January 4, 1904. 

FOR THE JUNE MEETING 1904. 

For Three Years Old and Upwards. 

The Suburban. one m,le an " a " uart « Cagh vaIue $20,000 

The Commonwealth. •^SoT&M'E^.t* v., M $18,000 

The Advance. w * , « b * for age ' one " ,,le an<1 tl,ree ,ur, °T«-h value $15,000 

I In- Cone; Inland, six furlongs, S2O0O added 
1 11,- InrtA Harwliranc J The Sheep-head Bay, one mile, W2SOO added 1 (IE finn 

I ML .1 II I It ll<tllUlt<t|»> n,,. i. onK Island, one mile and a furlong. S3000 *IO,UUU 

I added— Total 87500 added. Estimated value. . J 

The Equality 
The Thistle. 



Penalties and Allowances, one mile c /. 11(1(1 

83DOO added. Estimated value 9 U.uUU 

Selling, one mile and a furlong ti* t 

92000 added. Intimated value H> *,UUV 



The 
The 

The 
The 
The 
The 
The 

The 
The 



For Three Years Old. 

^u/ifr Penalties ami Allowances, seven furlongs 

OWIII. W3000 added. Estimated value. 

QmnHriff Handicap, one mile and a furlong 

^I'lllUIlll. $3000 added. Estimated value. 

For Two Years Old. 

'enaltles and Allowances, six furlongs 

Cash value. . 



$ 6,000 
$ 6,000 



Great Trial. 
Double Event. 
Zephyr 
Spring. 
Vernal. 



$25,000 
$20,000 
$5,000 



First Part, five and a half furlongs, 8 I e, 00(1 Mft linn 

Second Part, six furlongs, 810,000. Cash value $..U,VUU 

Penalties and Allowances, five and a half furlongs 

82000 added. Estimated value 
Penalties and .Allowances, six furlongs if C |I|U) 

82000 added. Estimated value * «7,UUU 

l nr Fillies, penalties and allowances, live furlongs O r f\(\fi 

82000 added. Estimated value V f,UUV 



Steeplechases. 



Beacon 
Independence. 



Penalties and Allowances, about two miles and a half J g 000 



83000 added. Estimated value. 
Handicap, ahout t wo and a half miles 

825O0 added. Estimated value. 



$ 4,000 



FOR THE AUTUMN MEETING, 1904. 

For Two Years Old and Upwards. 



The Flight. 



Penalties and Allowances, seven furlongs fl" /. 0(1(1 

83000 added Estimated value v V y V\JV 



For Three Years Old. 



The September. 



Penalties and Allowances, one mile and three furlongs 4J f. ft OH 
83000 added. Estimated value * Uj^VU 



For Two Years Old. 



The Autumn. ^^ iM l n tr^ a ^Ul^ nit inti m ^ value $ 5,000 

The Flatbush. p «»* m " *" d *»•»—-. tarlon *' c „ h vaIue $10,000 

The Great Eastern. " ix furl " ng8 cash v.iu. $ 7,500 

FOR THE AUTUMN MEETING, 1906. 

tl. C,4..i.:*.r For the produce of mares covered in 1903, six furlongs CHC AAA 
InerUtUrity. sm. i Estimated value 0,UUU 

Entry Blanks may be had on application to the office of the Breeder and 
Sportsman, or may be obtained from the 

CLERK OF THE COURSE, 

The Coney Island Jockey Club, 
Windsor Arcade, 571 Fifth Ave., New York City. 



"Sav e-Th e-Ho r sr 'S ray in Cure. 



5.00 With written guarantee. 



On Broken Down, Weak, Sprained and Ruptured Ligaments and 
Tendons Its Power is Unfailing. 

No Man need see his Horse suffer and become incapacitated. 

"""QAVC TUr. UnQQC" positively and permanently cures bone and bog 

OMYL-I nL-nUnOL SPAVIN. THOROUGHPIN, RINGBONE (except low ringbone), 

CURB, splint, capped hock. WINDPUFF, SHOE BOIL, WEAK and SPRAINED TEN- 
DONS, AND ALL LAMENESS. 

'■SAVE-THE-HORSE" cures without scar, blemish or lossof hair; can be applied anywhere and 
in all conditions and extremes of weather. Horses mav be worked as usual with shin or ankle boots, 
as no harm can result from destruction of hair or scalding of limb. 

Cured horses are absolute oertainties as to the possibility of tho remedy for your own oase. Such 
results, as shown in our booklet, by business men whose reliability can be readily ascertained, have 
carried "SAVE-THE-HORSE" over skepticism, prejudice and uncertainty. Send for the booklet 
and copy of written guarantee, which Is as binding to protect you as the best legal talent oonld 
make It. 

SS.OO UPEH. BOTTLE. 

Written guarantee with every bottle. Need of second bottle improbable, except In rarest 
cases. If your case is different we advise frankly as to possibility of the remedy effecting a cure. 
Give veternarian*s diagnosis, if he is competent. Dehcribo age, development, location of swellings, 

lameness and way horse carries and holds leg. 

$5.00 a bottle at all druggists and dealers, or sent express prepaid. 

TROY CHEMICAL CO., 

D. E. NEWELL, 519 Mission St., 



Manufacturers, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



TROY, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Agent 



JANUAEY 2; 1»04] 



Cite gvesDsv anii gpxrrterrtmi 



18 



NEW E. C." 

NEW "SCHULTZE" 
SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 

Manufactured by 

THE AMERICAN M E. G." and "SCHULTZE" Bunpwrter Co., Ltd. 

PHIL. R BEKRART CO., Paolflo Coa*t RepreaeotatlTe. 



BALLISTITF 
The Standard Dense Powder of the World. " ■■■■ 

STILL LEADS AT THE TRAPS OR IN THE FIELD. 

Balllstile wins from the limit marks In distanoc handicaps, at either live birds or flying targets 
as It always gives the highest velocities with the closest and most even patterns at all ranges 
Balllstile is absolutely unvarying In results being waterproof, smokeless, odorless, without residue 
re*ures lower than black powder, unaffected by ago or climatic ohangos, and never pits, rusts or 
orrodes the barrels. Balllstlte Is sol d wit h above guarantee. 

Take No One's Word. Try It for Yourself. 

i u I ah A on 75 CHAMBERS ST,, NEW YORK CITY 

U. Pl» L— r\ \J Otv \J ■ Telephone 1747 Franklin. 

Importen and Dealers In Fire Arnin, Ammunition and Fencing Goods. 

Sole Agents for THE REBLE GUN and BALLISTITE (Dense) 
and EMPIRE (Bulk SMOKELESS POWDERS. 

A postal brings catalogue and "Shooting Facts" (third edition) 

BALLISTITF 
The Standard Dense Powder of the World. 




Loaded, i n O. P. W . Smokeless. 
Winning' Highest Average at All Shoots. 



IF TOO WANT THE BEST ASK FOR 



California Powder Works 

FACTORY LOADED SHELLS. 

If Yonr Dealer doo't keep them write the 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS — Office 330 Market St., San Francisco 

Manafactnrers of HERCfJL.ES DYNAMITE. HERCULES GELATINE, CHAMPION 
IMPROVED BLASTING. BLACK BLASTING. BLACK SPORTING 
C. P. W. SMOKELESS and MILITARY SMOKELESS. 
AUo sell CAPS and FUSE. 



Parker Automatic Ejector 

The "Old Reliable's" Latest 



Attachment 



Fend for Catalogue 




New York Salesroom 
3 1 Warren St. 



PARKER BROS,, Meriden. Conn. 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY BEST" REMEDY 

EVER USED ON HORSES' FEET. 

IT PENETRATES and DRIES IN quickly aod DOES 
NOT GUM and FILL UP THE PORES like tar and oil 
compounds. It ll the GREATEST REMEDY ever used to 
remove SORENESS and FEVER from the foot, and makes It 

possible to (jet (food services out of 8 norse working on hard 
and hot pavements 

It gives natural nourishment to the foot and Incites a 
rapid, healthy growth-ALL DRYNESS AND BRITTLE- 
NESS quickly disappears 

QUARTER CRACKS and SAND CRACKS are rapidly 
grown out when directions given In our booklet are followed. 

It Is a SURE CURE for CORNS, CONTRACTED FEET 
and NAIL WOUNDS If directions are followed 

It PRE.VENTS SOUND FEET FROM BECOMING UN- 
SOUND and GROWS a TOUGH. STRONG ELASTIC WALL 
and HEALTHY FROG— A FOOT WHICH WILL STAND 
WORK on racecourses. 

Many of the best owners and trainers state that for track 
work nothing equals it. In many cases horses have reduced 
their record* fceveral seconds, due to Its use. 

It Is a CER'J A1N CURE for THRUSH and SCRATCHES 
We Guarantee That It Will Do What We Claim 
and Will Refund Money If It Falls. 

I"RICE8:-Quarts. tl 00; Half-Gallon, 1175; Gallon, 13 00; 
SH-Gallon, 15 50; Five-Gallon, 110 00. 
Books giving full directions for Its use and much valuable Information as to shoeing are supplied 
free. 

Don't fail to read "ad." giving information concerning Campbell's Iodoform Gall Cure In next 
Issue of this paper. It Is the best and because of its merits is rapidly displacing all others. 

JAS. B. CAIrPBELL&CO.. Manufacturers, 4 1 2 W.Hadison St., CHICAGO, ILL 
Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not In stock askHhcm to write any Jobber for It 




Du Pont Gun Powder 

SMOKELESS. SHOT GUN and 

MILITARY POWDER 

Black Powder for Sporting and Blasting Purposes 
i he Reputation of a Hundred Yean is the Guarantee of 

DU PONT POWDER 

5t9 Mlaalon St.. Ilooin 1 1 1 , San Frannlur*. i'n I 



C. A HA 111 ITT. Ajr««t. 



SMITH GUNS 



WIN 

LONGEST 
STRAIGHT RUNS 



At 8. K. Trap Shootl"K 
Association 
May 22-83— 84— SS 
VAUGHN. - 72 Straights 
FEUDNKK. - 02 •• 

Also longest straight rnn 
and Hint moatlaaat live birds 




SMITH ailNS are made for 
All Kinds of Ammunition... 

?p"X°.V„»,o Hunter Arms Co., Fulton, N. Y. 

PHIL. B. BEKEART CO., San Francisco. Coast Representative 



SPRATTS PATENT. 



DOG 



CAKES 

REMEDIES 

SOAP. 



NEWARK, N. J. Send for free copy of "DOG CULTURE " 8T LOUIS, MO. 

Pacific Coast Branch— 1324 Valencia Street, San Francisco. 
Agents for " SANITAS " Disinfectant. 



(KERN COUNTY) 



Commencing Monday, Jan. 11, 1904 

Judge, W. S. BELL, Pittsburg. Pa. 



Members' Stake 

Annual Derby 

All-Aged Stake 

Champion Stake 

Entries for A 11- Aged Stake close Dec 1 ft.1903 
W W. VAN ARSDALE (San Francises) 
President. 
ALBERT BETZ, Secretary. 
No. 201 Parrott Bldg , 8. F., Cal 
•S-For Entry Blanks and Information address I he 
Secretary. 



ST. HKKNAKDS. 



Twpniv.FipQt Annual Tniak classified advertisements 

I null If I II L nilllUQI I I IHI0 Adeertitemenu undtr t/iit head oneeeni per word 

* Vtr ingfrtion. damh fn nrrnmntmu nrtiir 
OF THB 

Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club 

TO BE RUN AT 

Bakersfield 



T STUD— CHAMPION LE KING. GRAND- 
est headed St Bernard on the Coast. Fee 120. 
W WALLACE, 5» Boyce St., San Francisco. 



A' 



HI I.l, TERRIERS. 



pULL TERRIERS FOR SALE— THE REGIS- 
J> tered stud Bull Terrier FLYER by Little 
Flyer, out of Lorna Doone, and two young bitches 
one year and a half old; cheap. GEORGE FUR- 
LONG. Anaconda. Montana 



COCKER SPANIEL*. 



I)LUMERIA VICTORIA — ABSOLUTELY THE 
best black Cocker bitch on the Coast must be 
sold. Make your ofler to Mil H. H STANLEY 
at 125 Geary street, San Francisco. 



COLLIES 

The 
BEACH 

HILL 
Kennels 
955 
First St. 
San Jose 

CHAMPION HANOVER MONARCH 

(A. K. C. 8. B. 6998) by the great sire Ch. 
Ellwyn Astrologer from Ch Old Hall Moon 
Fee »IB. Pictures and Pedigree upon appllca* 
tlon. High-class Puppies for sale. 




U>OR SALE— COCKER SPANIEL PUPPIE8 
1 by f'h. Hampton Goldie. Apply at junction 
old county and Redwood roads. Frultvale, Alamads 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 

TR1SH AND SCOTCH TERRIER PUPPIES 
L at $12 and $15 Sired by Champion Loyne 
Ruffian and Champion Fighting Mao. M its. 
BRADLEY-DYNE. Saturna P O B. C. 



COLLIES. 



pOLLIE PUPS FOR SALE-BY PRIZE 
- winning Imported sires and dams, fit for 
bench, ranch or farm Both sexes Prices accord- 
ing to quality. Correspondence solicited: all let- 
ters cheerfully answered THOS. S. GRIFFITH, 
Box 1907, Spokane, Wash. 



AT 

STUD 



AT STUD^ 

CUBA OP KENWOOD 

(Qlenbelgh Jr.-8tella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II) 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

It. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Kakerifleld, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



C0C0ANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BE8T FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIOS 

FOR HALS IN LOTS TO SUIT IT 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO 

S08 California Street, Han Franolsoa, Oml. 



ROSE HOTEL 

PLEASANTON. CAL. 

Enlarged, Rebuilt. Twenty live New Rooms 
Newly Furnished. Electric Lights, 
Running Water. Up to date. 
A. g. OLKW a SON - - Proprietors 

Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cumi In 48 Honrs. 



CAPSULES 



Hnperbir to Cotmlhn. Onhebu or InJeoltVB 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 



-I.RAI.KK8 IN- 



55 57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 
Tsi.si'uofb Main 199 



16 



©it* $vet?l>cv ctufc gpovteman 



[January 2, 1904 



Telephone-. 

South 640 




San Francisco, Cal 




C. AT SEA GIRT, 




the annual military shoot, won the Wim= 
bledon Cup, Capt. Richards, Ohio, score 
91=100. 

Troop A, of New York, won the 
Revolver Team Match, using U. M. C. 
.38 S. & W. special cartridges, score 849. 

Leech Cup Match, shot at 800, 900, 
and 1000 yards, was also won with 
U. M. C. .30=40 cartridges, by C. B. Winder, 
Ohio, score 94=105. 

T he Thomas Bullet 

now used in all U. M. C. .30 Government 
cartridges was used by practically every 
rifleman in eveiy match where Government- 
made ammunition was not required. These 
facts speak volumes for U. M. C. military 
and big game cartridges. 

C. M. C. .30-40 cartridges won the International 
Palm a Trophy at Hlsley, England, against tha military 
rille teams of the world 




The Union Metallic Cartridge Company 



Agency, 



313 BROADWAY, 

NEW YORK CITY. 



Bridgeport. Conn. 



Depot, 86-88 FIRST ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



K. E. DRAKE, Mgr. 



§ 
I 

i 




REPEATING SHOT GUNS 

A CHANCE FOR A DOU 

A QUESTION often asked about Repeating Shotguns is, "How quick can a second shot befired with 
them?" Shooters that have used Repeaters answer with one accord: "Doubles" are just as easy to 
make with a WINCHESTER REPEATING SHOTGUN as they are with a double barreled 
gun. The third shot that a Winchester Repeater gives often bags a badly crippled bird which otherwise 
would get away. "Winchester Repeating Shotguns are made in "Take Down" styles in 12 and 16 gauge. 




Clabrough, Golcher & Go. 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 



GUNS 
Sun Goods 



**-Send for Catalogue. 




FISHING 

Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



FACTORY . . . 
LOADED . 



SHELLS 



DU PONT 
"E. C." 
SCHULTZE 
HAZARD 



SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BAIXISTITE 
LAFLIN Sc RAND 
'INFALLIBLE " 



What More do von Want? 



2 



(The ^rcefcer anO Qpovxaman 



I/January 9, 1#04 



HALL f3o H iSLi 18 14 Over 50 Head Already Consigned 

Mayview Stock Farm, Garfield Co,, Wash. 



HARRY MARVIN 2:22 1-2 

and many other small but choice 

consignments from prominent breeders, 



Nearly as Many More Pledged. 

To Be Sold at Auction at the Second Spring Combination Sale of 

J. L. ricCARTHY & SON 

IRVINGTON PARK, PORTLAND, ORE, MARCH 1, 2 and 3, 1904 

High-Class Trotters and Pacars, with and without records, for Track or Road, Matched Pairs, Choice Brood Mares, Youngsters 
and Stallions will bring more money at this Sale than can be obtained at any other time or place, as there is a strong 
demand for these classes in the Northwest, and all the good buyers will attend this sale. Choice positions in 



Entries Close Feb. 1, 1904, 

Consig-n Now and Your Horse will be in 
the Public Eye until the day he is sold. 



the Catalogue will soon be at a premium, 
Write for Entry Blanks. 

j. l. McCarthy & son, 

Room 8, Hamilton Bids:, Portland. Ore. 



PIIMAIj sale 

THE LAST OF THE PALO ALTO FARM HORSES. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., 



1732 Market Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Will sell THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 14, 1904, at 8 o'clock, 

the following consignment from the celebrated Palo Alto Stock Farm, absolutely the last of the 
horses on this great farm, all by great sires and from great mares: 

COLOR AND SEX. FOALED. SIRS. DAM. 

Bay Ally May 20. 1903. .Nutwood Wilkes 2:16'/, . . Cressida 2:18 3 i bv Palo Alto 

mack colt May 17, 1903. McKlnney 2:11*4 Arena •.••).• . by Palo Alto 

bay colt April 23, 191)1. . Monbells 2:23Vi Maiden 2:23 bv Electioneer 

Black Ally April 22, 19113 McKlnney 2:tl!< Elden 2:19!J by Nephew 

Chestnut colt April 18. 1901. .Nutwood Wilkes 2:16 l 4. . Paleta 2:16 by Palo Alto 

Bay Oily Aprils, 1903. .. Nutwood Wilkes 2:16!4. . Novelist 2:27 by Norval 

Bay iilly April 7. 1903 ..Nutwood Wilkes 2:16* . . . Llska +.IVH by Electioneer 

Bay Ally Mar 31, 1903 ..McKlnney 2:1 IX Lucyneer 2:27 by Electioneer 

Ulack till v Mar 21,1903 .McKinney 2:ll}< Aerolite by Palo Alto 

Bay Ally Mar. 20, 1903.. .Nutwood Wilkes 2:16(4 . Adbuta by Advertiser 

Black colt Mar 20, 1903. ..McKlnney fclljtf Sweet Rose (1) 2:26S4 by Electioneer 

Brown colt Mar 13. 1903. . . Nazote 2:28V4 Gertrude Russell tSB% bv Electloaeer 

Bay oolt Mar 9, 19)3.. . .Mendocino 2: 1954 .....Mary Osborne (3) 2:28", by Azmoor 

Bay filly Mar. 3, 1903 . . Monbells 2:23* Wildfljwer (2) 2:21 by Electioneer 

Bay Ally Feby. 15, 1903. Nutwood Wilkes 2:16* ...Expressive (3) 2:I2'J by Electioneer 

Bay oolt Feby 14. 1903 .Monbells 2.23V4 Manzanlta (4) 2: 16 by Electioneer 

Brown Ally Jan. 28. 1903 . Mendocino 2:19S4 Lulu Wilkes by (Jeo. Wilkes 

Bay colt May 2, 1902 ... Iran Alto 2:124 Aria (3) 2: 16' 4 iiy Bernal 

Brown colt April 11. 1900 McKlnney 2:ll!4 Helena fclljj by Electioneer 

Bay mare April 20, 1900 .Dexter Prince Lady Agnes by Electioneer 

Marion 2:26^. b m. .April 17 1883 .Piedmont 2:17^ Lady Morgan by Hambletonlan 10 

Sonoma 2:28 Mar. 19. 1883 .Electioneer Sontag Mohawk bv Mohawk Chief 

Brown Ally April 13, 1902 McKinney 2:IIJ< 8w<et Rose (I) 2:26V4 by Electioneer 

Bay Ally Mar 30, 1902. Nutwood Wilkes 2:1«* .Liska 2:|)V', by Electioneer 

Horses will beat yard January lllh for Inspection. Send for Catalogues. 

FRKI) H. CHASE & CO., 1732 Market St.. S. F. 



Speed, Breeding and Individuality 



RITA H. 2:11 1-4 

Pacing Mare by McKinney 2:11 1-4 

ELECTRO MCKINNEY 

Brown Colt, Four-Year-Old Trotter by McKinney 2:11 1-4 

RITA H. is a dark brown mare who stands nearly 16 hands high, and will weigh in raoing trim 
about 1050 lbs This mare has bad this year a very remarkable record. She started In the North- 
western Circuit in the States of Oregon and Washington, and out of eight starts won her first seven 
races and only lost four beats during the entire circuit, and has a pacing record of 2:1154. The mare 
is five years old and Is excellent on the road. She does not pull or lug, and a lady can drive her 
anywhere. Last spring she trotted a workout mile in 2:1854, and repeated in 2:1654, after only seven 
weeks' work Herowner has driven her in 2:12',$ in the Los Angeles Driving Club races, she having 
won all of them in which she started. This mare can step two heats below 2:10- 

ELECTRO McKINNEY is a brown stallion foaled in 1900, and stands 15 hands 1 inch in height. 
He trotted a full mile as a two-year-old in 2:31 54, last quarter In 35 seconds, and when a three-year- 
old a full mile in 2:21%, last quarter in 32 seconds He is perfectly gaited and a grand individual In 
every respect. Weighs about 950 lbs. ELECTRO McKINNEY is bred in the purple, and is one of 
the best sons of McKlnney alive to day McKlnney is undoubtedly the greatest sire for his age. 
living or dead. ELECTRO McKINNEY was not raced last year, being only a three-year-old and 
not entered in any stakes it was decided to hold him over. 

These horses are all r<ght and there is not a thing the matter with them, but my business 
demands are such that I cannot afford to devote any time to racing them. For prices and further 
particulars address 

BYRON ER KEN BR EC HER. 



Or Inquire 



301 ( I lililKli Bl'ILDING, LOS ANGELES, OAL. 
it Office of BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 



At the same time and at the same place there will also be sold the stallion Daedalion 2:11 by 
Diablo 2:19)4, dam Grace, dam of two in 2:15. three in 2:20 by Buccaneer. Daedalion is one of the most 
promising young sires in California, and is able to race and reduce his record. Consigned by Geo 
H. Fox, Clements, Cal. 

To close a copartnership. Mr. C. A. Durfee sends the following four by McKlnney 2:11(4: Johnny 
McKenzle. two yearold gelding, dam Babe by Ferdinand 1815. son of Straihmore, second dam Fire- 
wood by Fayette Wilkes, son of Geo. Wilkes, third dam by Blackwocd 74 and fourth dam by Wash- ' 
ingt n Denmark. This colt la a great prospect and is entered and paid up on in all the laading three 
year old stakes in California. Twilight and Daisy B , full sisters Ave and four years old by McKlnney 
out of Stemwlnder, dam of the great Directum 2:0554 These should be the greatest broodmares ever 
It (I In California. Bessie D, a Ally by MoKlnney out of a mare by a son of Venture. She is 
bred much like the other two and a great prospect. 

Geo. A. Davis of Pleasanton consigns the following: Directory, blk g , 1901. by Rey Direct, dam 
Mamie H by Alexander's Bay Allen: Rey Vera. blk. f, 1901, by Rey Direct-Anteera by Anteeo; 
Anona, blk (.. 1902, by Charles Derby-May (dam of Bay Rum 2:25)4) °y Anteeo: Cnarlottlne. blk. f , 
I9">1, by Charles Derby, dam Miss Direct by Direct; Mamie Rey, blk f., 1902, by Rey Direct, dam 
Mtmle H. by Alexander's Bay Allen. 

Consigned by A Beroer, Redwood City: Yearling colt by Mendocino, dam Carmine by Electricity. 

Consigned by C Harling. Nevada: Bay pacer by Falrose, dam Mischief, dam of Primrose 2:093<[. 
One of the grandest and hist roadsters in California 

Consigned by I L Borden. Sao Francisco: Ch. g. N. L. B (2) 2:21% by Diablo, dam by Washing- 
ton 25JJ7. 'this ptcer worked a mile last year in 2:12)4. He is one of tbe best road horses in Cali- 
forn'a and citn be driven by a lady 

Consigned by James LeBaron Smith, San Francisco: By Mack, brown stallion by McKinney 
2:11)4, dam By By, full sister to Lockheart 2:08% by Nutwood. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO, 1732 Mark.t St. 



A Sidney Stallion With Earning Capacity 



HARNESS and SADDLES 

HIGH-CLASS 
FINISH AND 
WORKMANSHIP 
AT 

MODERATE 
PRICES, 

THE 

BIG STOKE 

JEPSEN BROS CO..NO 

1145-47 Market St. San Francisco 
Pedigrees Tabulated T^TJ^'^~«l 

Sportsman. M Q4»ry ttrMt, Baa Fr»noitco, C*l. 




In pursuance of my intention to retire from the business of breeding horsis, 
and having- disposed of all my broodmares at auction, I now offer at private sale 
the stallion 

William Harold 2:i3i-4. 

Flis sire is the great Sidney 2;19|, grandsire of the champion trotter of the 
world, Lou Dillon 1:58$, and his dam the great race and broodmare Cricket 2:10 
(dam of four in the list) by Steinway, the greatest son of Strathmore. 

WILLIAM HAROLD is a producer The only two of his get to start are 
that wonderfully fast trotter Janice 2:08} and the pacer Dan Burns 2:15. 
WILLIAM HAROLD'S services in the stud were very limited up to three years 
ago, as he was raced. His weanlings, yearlings and two-year-olds are very prom- 
ising and have size, good looks and great natural speed, besides being uniform in 
color, nearly all bays. He is a sure foal getter, is in the very best condition, tound 
and healthy, and with ordinary good business management can earn in the stud 
in 1904 the price asked for him. 

Fortibulated pedigreoand full particulars, address 

H. W. MEEK, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



3 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-five years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to tbe ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 




RED BALL BRAND. 



Awarded Gold Medal 
At California State 
Fair 1898. 

Every horseowner who 
values bis stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of It on hand. It 
improves and keeps 
stock In the pink of 
condition. 

Manhattan Pood Co. 

1 253 Folsoni St., San Franolaco 
Ask your grocers or dealers for It. 



Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

O. P. EERTELL, Manager 



January 9, 1904) 



(Kite gvcc&cv mxti Q p o vtetnati 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority ot the Pacific Coast. 

— orrici — 

3c> GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
Tci.kpmoni: UI»ck 886. 



r..rn.« one Year 93, Six Month* • 1 . 7 ft , Three Heath ■ 91 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 
Monet xuould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W Kelley, SB Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name atd 
«ddress not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
j! good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January o, 1004 



THE LAST OPPORTUNITY to secure colts and 
fillies consigned to a sale by Palo Alto Stock 
Farm will be given buyers at Fred H. Cbase & Co 's 
salesyard, 1732 Market street, this city, next Thurs- 
day evening, January 14th. Those who appreciate 
what this means will be there and it will be a great 
sale Every horsemen in America knows that tht> 
late Senator Stanford was a progressive breeder. Ho 
was not satisfied with anything but progress in all 
his undertakings. The idea of standing still in any 
line of business was abhorreat to him, and he always 
aimed to improve and build up toward perfection. 
He founded at Palo Alto a great stock farm for the 
breeding of trotting horses. He met with success, 
but to the day of his death he had no idea of 
stopping or being content with that success, 
but aimed for an improvement each succeeding 
year. Had he lived Palo Alto Stock Farm would 
have been continued and been one of the great object 
lessons in the world in light harness horse breed- 
ing. His ideas were carried out after his death 
as near as possible by Superintendent Frank Covey, 
but the managers of the estate willed it that the farm 
must be discontinued and all the horses sold. During 
the past two years the auction rings in California and 
at Cleveland and New York have seen the stallions 
and broodmares of the farm sold to the high bidder, 
until there is now left only the leventeen foals of 
1933, and a few mares and older colts, twenty-four 
head in all, to be sold at auction as above stated on 
Thursday evening next. These yearliDgs are un- 
doubtedly the best bred lot ever sent toasahsiirg 
from the great farm. They are by McKinney the 
leading sire of 2:10 trotters in the world; Nutwct d 
Wilkes, sire of the fastest trotter of the entire Wilkr s 
tribe of horses; Monbells, Beautiful Bells' last win 
and cjrtainly destined to be one of her great- 
est; Mendocino, that bears the strongest resem- 
blance to the great Electioneer of any of bis 
get, and sire of two great 2:10 trotter; Iran 
Alto, the greatest bred and the fastest son of the 
great race horse Palo Alto; and Nazote, own brother 
to that wonderful race horse Azote 2:04|. By such 
sires as these and out of some of the greatest mart s 
the farm ever owned, why should not these yearlings 
be considered the best ever bred on the farm. If you 
have not yet received a catalogue containing the full 
breeding of all these horses, send to Fred H. Cbase & 
Co. for one, and make up your mind to attend the 
sale. The opportunity will never oe offered again, 
and it is one that horsemen who want the best cannot 
afford to lose. 



PLEASANTON will open the California circuit this 
year with a four days' program of harness racing 
for which good big purses will be offered. This was 
decided at a meeting of horsemen in that thriving 
town this week, and Messrs. A. S. Olney and Geo. A. 
Kelly were present at the meeting of the P. C. T. H. 
B. A. Directors, held at the office of the Breeder 
and Sportsman on Thursday of this week, where 
they made this announcement. The Pleasanton 
people desire to open the circuit. There are 200 
horses in training there now and with the exception 
of those in the string of Monroe Salisbury and one or 
two others, all will be raced in California provided a 
circuit is announced. The Directors of the Breeders 
association have about agreed upon a program of 
stakes and purses, and will be ready to announce the 
same in next week's issue of the Breeder and 
SPORTSMAN. Their meeting will probably be held at 
Santa Rosa, where one of the very best tracks in the 
Stateis situated and where the association has always 
held very successful meetings. Petaluma and Vallejo 
will give meetings also, and the first four meetings 
will probably be in the following order: Pleasanton, 
Santa Rosa, Petaluma, Vallejo. If Woodland gives 
a meeting*, which it probably will, it could follow 



Vallejo and take its usual week just prior to the State 
Fair. This plan would give Pleasanton the last week 
in July for its opening or the circuit, which would bf 
very agreeable to the horsemen. Look out for the 
announcements next week. They will interest every- 
body. 

TTHK BKK BDBR9 FUTURITY for foals of 1901, to 
I be contested for by three-year-olds this year, 
promises to furnish two highly interesting contt sts. 
Payment was made January2d on more than fifty 
three-year-olds entered in this $6000 stake, which Is 
evidence that that number of colts are being put in 
training. As owners do not designate whether their 
co'.ts are trotters or pacers until making starting pay- 
ments ten days before the first day of the meetine, it 
will not be possible to tell until that time in what 
proportion the trotters and pacers will be divided, 
but the probability is that the trotting division « ill 
bare the Urgest number ef starters. At any rati , it 
lo >ks now as if there will be two great contests, and 
we hope to see the three-year-old race record of the 
State beaten in both events. 



IF WAR ENSUES between Russia and Japan, tie 
I price of hay in this market will go soaring. As 
will be seen by the quotations of this week, good bay 
is a luxury here now. The prices quoted are as fo'- 
Iows: Wheat, $14(<» 17 50; wheat and oat, $14(<i 16 50; 
»at, $14(al6; wild oat, $13<.? 14 50; barley, $12 - 1 1: 
alfalfa, $12(<' 13 50 per ton. A telegram from Wash- 
ington received this week states that the Uniltd 
Slates Government has ordered over six thousand 
t >ns of hay to be bought in this port and shipped to 
Manila. It will cost the government $19.50 per ton. 
It is also said that there are several big orders for 
hay to be shipped to Japan for the Japanese Govern- 
ment in case hostilities are declared. Should the 
rains hold off much longer in California hay will jump 
much higher and there is no telling at what price it 
will stop. 



WHAT'S THE ODDS? is the title of a book just 
issued by the well known bookmaker J(>e 
rilman. known as one of the raconteurs of the 
running turf. The book is fullof good yarns collected 
by Mr. Ullman during his many years experier.ee, 
and are funny, true and clean. The book is hand- 
somely bound and profusely illustrated. 



GEORGE J. FULLER, aged 69, one of the greatest 
drivers of trotting horses in the country, who 
at one time had charge of the stables of the Czar of 
Russia, is dead. His death occurred at Nashville, 
Tennessee, on the 7th inst. 



Still Room for Many More. 

The coming of the two minute trotter may have 
scared a few of the more timid horsemen out of busi- 
ness as it was predicted would be the case, but to 
date none has been reported as missing. Nor has any 
trainer lost heart, so far as can be learned. As a 
matter of fact, the two minute trotter did not do any 
more damage than was done by the first two minute 
pacer, so far as actual racing is concerned. There is 
still plenty of room for the trotter that is not quite 
good enough to get to the top of the record ladder. 
And the more you look into it the more you will be 
convinced that the standing space is by no means 
crowded. For instance, a floating item in the turf 
papers calls attention to the fact that but four trot- 
ting stallions have race records better than 2:07, and 
the four, with their race records, are Cresceus 2:03|, 
Directum 2:05}, Blngen 2:06}, Rhythmic 2:06|. 
Which means that the 2:07 trotter is still some pump- 
kins at the races and ought to continue to win his 
share of the money for some time. 

The faster classes have never yet been overcrowded. 
Right now men who campaign at the more important 
meetings are looking for trotters that they think can 
make a good showing in the 2:07 class in 1904 And 
if a glance is taken over the list of eligibles it will be 
enough to show that the fields can not be large. Yet 
the trotting record is 1:58}. When it gets to 1:55 
there will be no decrease in the demand for trotters 
that can race in 2:05 to 2:08, and the 2:05 class will be 
considered a very fast one, for trotters, when the 
great majority of the present generation of horserren 
has answered the final summons. — A'c n f" »/ f A // Stick 
Farm. 

Ten Years' Experience. 

Mr. A. R Jones, veterinary surgeon at Lament, Iowa, writes 
as follows: ,- I desire to Inform you that I have been using (julnn's 
Ointment for the last ten yean with the greatest success For 
removing curbs, splints, spavins and other bunches am moro than 
pleased with Its work This Is the general verdlctor the leading 
horsemen everywhere. For curbs, splints, spavins. wlndpiifTs and 
all enlargement* try (julnn's Ointment. I'rlc* one dol'ar per 
bottle delivered. Satisfaction guaranteed Address \V. Ft. Eddv 
& Co., Whitehall, N. Y. If you cannot obtain It from yourdrugglat. 



New Year's Racing at Phoenix, Arizona. 

Two days' racing were held at the Phu-nix, Ari- 
zona, track on Thursday and Friday, the last and first 
days of the old and new year. 

On Thursday the first event was a stake for tbrt t • 
minute trotters. All three heats were won by Del- 
nette, owned by A. H. Davidson and driven by .1 K. 
Wheat. The time was 2:55*, 2:46} and 2:28}. The 
last heat was the only one in which Delnette showed 
her real speed. Lady Allen, owned and driven by 
W. A. Priestly, was second in the first and third 
heats and third in the second heat. Hart wood, owned 
by Wolf Sachs and driven by Tayior, was third in the 
first and third heats and second in the second heat. 

The two-year-old match race, best two heats in 
three, half mile dash, between Tommy Lawson, owned 
by William Barkley, and Governor Brodie, owned by 
William Lossing, was won by Tommy Lawson, who 
took two of the three heats. Governor Brodie took 
the first heat in 1:41, Liwson getting the second and 
third in 1:34 and 1:31. 

Iu the amateur road race to cart thore were two 
heats, four starters. Kate, owned by Dr. Ramsey, 
took both heats in 2:55 and 2:51; Prince, owm d by 
Mr. Harmon, was second in both heats and Urmelia, 
owned by Ed Worcester, was third in both heats. 
The race was for a trophy. 

In the half-mile dash running race Bella Donna, 
owned by Jack Gibson, won in 52 seconds, with Al, 
owned by G. A. Wilson, second. 

A much larger crowd attended the second day's 
racing, as it was a holiday. The event of the day was 
the 2:24 trot for a purse of $100, divided into four 
moneys, $50, $25, $15 and $10. The race was best 
three in five but only three heats were trotted as Hex 
Mambrino took all three in 2:33, 2:31 and 2:30}. Rex 
is owned by Dan Steele and was driven by Johnson. 
A remarkable thing about the race is that all four 
horses occupied the same positions at the finish of 
each of the three heats, those positions being as fol- 
lows: Delnette, owned by A. H. Davidson and driven " 
by Wheat, second; Miss Boydello, owned by W. C. 
Greene and driven by Klotzbach, third; Oakwood, 
owned by J. A. Plattner and driven by Taylor, fourth. 
There was some little trouble in scoring, one of the 
horses having to change sulkys a time or two by rea- 
son of breakage. Each heat was a good one and 
closely contested, though the second and third heats 
were the best. In the second Delnette was at the neck 
of Rex Mambrino all through the stretch. It is no- 
ticeable that none of the horses were up to their 
records as all have made b -tter than 2:30 and the win- 
ner, Rex Mambrino, has a record of 2:24. Delnette 
only the day before entered the 2:30 class, having 
made a record of 2:28}. 

In connection with this race and these horses it is 
proper to remark that both Oakwood and Delnette 
enjoy a national distinction in that the former was 
the first horse in the United States to make a record 
in 1903 and the latter was the last horse in the United 
States to mako a record in the same year. Oakwood 
broke into the 2:30 class on January 1 Bt, a year ago, 
with a record of 2:28^, and Delnette entered tho same 
class on Thursday, the last day of the year, with a 
record of 2:28}. 

The second event was the amateur road race be- 
tween Tom, driven by his owner, Walter Bennett, 
and Sally Pointer, driven by her owner, J.C. Adams. 
The race was for a trophy, a handsome plush lap- 
robe being the prize. 

The third race of the day was a quarter mile run 
between Flirt, owned by Mr. MeCallister and ridden 
by Graham, and Chic-Chic, owned by Jack Gibson 
and ridden by Commodore Passey. Brickmaktr whs 
entered by James Graham but was withdrawn. 
Chic-Chic won tho cash in 23*. 

A three-quarter mile run followed between Little 
Joe, owned by John P.Gibson and ridden by Passey, 
and Romar, owned by A. N. Portor and ridden by 
Wilson. Little Joe took the money. 



Has a New Stock Farm. 



Mr. A. G. F. Slice, who campaigned a string of 
horses in California a fow years ago, is now a resident 
of Monmouth, Illinois, where be has recently pur- 
chased a farm and stocked it with horses. It will be 
called the Stice Stock Farm, and his many California 
friends will wish him every tuccess in his undertak- 
ing. His premier siro will be Manager 2:0<>i by Nut- 
wood. This great horse is from the justly famous 
mare Carrie 2:29} [dam of Manager 2:00^, Wood boy 
2:191 and Darwin 2:13) by George Wilkes 2:22, truly 
the very cream of breeding. Manager Is already the 
sire of nine performers with standard records, and 
without doubt will prove a great race horse sire. 



The Mendocinos are race horses, as for instance 
Monte Carlo 2:07}. A yearling by Mendocino out of 
Carmino bv Electricity, socond dam a double pro- 
ducer by Dictator, is to be sold at Fr.-d H. Chase & 
Co's silesyard next Thursday evening. This yearling 
Is a dark bay colt and a good one. He is bred well 
enough to bead a stock farm. 



4 



[January 9, 1904 



JOTTINGS. 



MILLARD SANDERS Is indignant and righteously 
bo, over the protest that the tons of Ruber', 
B. inner have made against the ri cord of 2:05 which 
Lou Dillion made at Cleveland last jear hitched to a 
high wheel sulky. When he heard of the protest he 
said : 

"I could not, to save my life, say whether the 6ulky 
Lou Dillon pulled in 2:05 over the Cleveland track to 
beat Maud S.'s record had ball-bearing hubs or tot. 
I do know no wind shield was used, and I am willing 
to bjt $5000 that Lou Dillon can pull that tame sulk r, , 
which, by the way, weighed fifty five pounds — twi Ivtt 
more than Maud S.'s sulky— in less than 2:05. Mem- 
bers of the Bonner estate have for years offered 15000 
for any driver that would break Maud S.'s record. I 
broke it, and broke it fairly, with Lou Dillon, but I 
have never seen the color of their money. Now if 
they mean business about that $5000 offer. ( can take 
that same sulky Maud S. used— if it is still in gmul 
condition — <»nd drive Lou Dillon in less than 2:05 over 
the Cleveland track. I knew Lou would make them 
holler. They can't accept the result like true spurts- 
m«n and give Lou Dillon credit for her record." 

There will be very few horsemen who will blame 
Millard from getting a little "hot in the collar" over 
this protest and speaking as he has. The point that 
thesuluy he used with Lou Dillon had ball bearings 
i9 9imply a technical one. If Lou Dillon had drawn a 
friction axle sulky, 'and she may have done so) tome 
other technicality would doubtless have been raised. 
When Lou Dillon trotted her mile in 1:58$ Millard 
Sanders did aot carry a whip, and it would be just 88 
consistent for him to now claim that any faster record 
made by a trotter in the future will be invalid if the 
d river carries the customary whalebone, as it is for 
Messrs. Bonner to insist that the record of Maud S. 
to high wheels is not yet beaten. Every borserxan in 
America knows that Maud S., great mare as she was, 
Is not in the same class with Lou Dillon, who simply 
outclasses every trotter thus far produced. 



Wm. Hendrickson, the veteran horseman, who 
owned and campaigned Geo. M. Patchen Jr., has re- 
cently returned from the East, where he went lat t 
May with Clay 3. 2:13] and two or three others, one a 
full brother to Clav S. Mr. Hendrickson sol 1 Clay S. 
while there and left the other horses at Memphis, 
which he says is an ideal place to winter trotteis. 
While absent from California he saw Lou Dillon hold 
and afterwards saw her beat all the records. SiDce 
reaching home he has talked with Frank Malone ar.d 
several others and thiDk9 there i9 a strong probability 
that the gracdam of Lou Dillon was old Jenny Butter- 
fisld by Geo. M. Patchen Jr. 31. He says that Mr. 
Kimball once owned Jenny Butterfield, that she was 
purchased for William Ralston, and as she was a very 
b id puller Ralston did not want her and gave her to 
Kimball, who afterwards sold her. Her dam was by 
John Nelson. Mr. Hendrickson states that he re- 
members the mare and that she was a sorrel with one 
or possibly two white ankles behind. 



With due difference to the opinions of all those who 
think they know the breeding of Lou Dillon's gran- 
dam, I cannot help but believe that it will never be 
traced. The very fact that Mr. McFadyen, who owned 
her and bred several standard performers from her 
in her young days, made an extended investigation 
many years ago and wasunable to ascertain anything 
definite in regard to the matter, leads ne to believe 
that i*. is Impossible to get at the facts now when all 
parties who actually knew anything of the rxare are 
dead. Lou Milton's dam will, in my humble opinion, 
always be among those famous mares whose pedigree 8 
are often guessed at but absolutely unknown. 



It is amusing to read >in the da'ly j re si that a big 
row has been kicked up in the Board of Supervisors 
of San Francisco over the price paid recently for 
horses for the Fire Department. It seems that a 
dealer wai paid $275 each for the borsee, and there- 
upon an investigation was begun on the grounds that 
the price was excessive. Any horseman in California 
who knows anything of horse values, and the qualifi- 
cations which a horso must have, to be of practical 
every uay use in the fire department of this city, will 
know that at present market values, $275 is not a high 
price for one that is able to pass the examination. 
Ai the meeting of th.- Board where the subject was 
up for discussion, Fire Commissioner Watt produced 
a letter from a man in Pctaluma who offered to sell 
good horses at from $200 to $250. Tho fact that the 
Commissioner offered this letter in the best of faith 
and evidently believed that the 1 'etaluma man coul j 
deliver the goods, does not remove the ludicrous 
feature from the situation. There is seldom a heme, 
a cow or a dog sold at a good price, but the buj er (if 
the sale and price are reported in the papers) receives 



numerous letters from owners who rfftr superior ani- 
mals for loss money, and jet the market for good ones 
at good prices is never fully supplied. At the present 
time $275 is a very fair price for a horse that is young, 
Bound and of the proper weight and style to make 
him an engine or hook-and-laddi r horse. The fire 
department horse mu«t have size anc w< ight enough 
to pull heavyweight over cobliie stone e and action 
enough to move those heavy weights at a fair rate of 
► peed. He is not bred on every (aim and is more of a 
"chancy" horse than any thing else. The prices which 
the San Francisco authorities have been paying for 
lice department horses are none too high for animals 
that come up to the requirements. 



Bayswater Wilkes Goes to Woodland. 

Much of the patronage that has been extended dur- 
ing the past three years to S. H. Hoy s good stallion 
Biyswater Wilkes 2:25',, has come from residents if 
Yolo county who reside near Woodland, and so 
pleased are they with the weanlings, yearlings and 
two-year-olds they have by this horse, that Mr. Hoy 
has received many requests to stand the son of Sable 
Wilkes at that place during the season of 1 904, which 
he has concluded to do. Bayswater Wilkes has had 
very little opportunity in the stud, but his colts are 
showing such speed that it will be only a matter of a 
little time before the attention of breeders will beat, 
traded to him from all sections. 

His sire Sable Wilkes that held the three-year-old 
record of 2:18 is making a name for himself in the 
East and through his sons and daughters establishing 
a family that is destined to be one of the greatest of 
the branches of the Wilkes tribe. Oro Wilkes 2:11 
put eight new ones in the list this year, the good 
three-year-old mare Mary Gage 2;16J being one of the 
number. 

The dam of Bayswater Wilkes is one of the few 
thoroughbred mares that has product d two standard 
trotting porformers and earned a place in the list of 
Great Brood Mares. She is the dam of Senator L. 
2:23} that holds the world's four-mile record of 10:12. 
The second dam Bessie Sedgwick by the great four- 
mile horse Jo Daniels, was also a producer of trotters 
and tho dam of that good trotting mare Bessie Thorn 
2:221. Those who believe in the "thoroughbred close 
up" theory (and their names are legion; will find in 
Bayswater Wilkes a stallion that tho most radical 
opponents to that theory can not find fault with, as 
his thoroughbred dam and grandam were both pro- 
ducers of standard trotters. The produce of Bays- 
water Wilkes have size, excellent dispositions, the 
very best feet and legs and are the sort that never 
find the distance between points too long. Whether 
in a race of mile heats, or driven for 75 miles a day on 
the road, the get of Bayswater Wilkes are alwajs 
"up in the collar" and never look for openings in the 
fence. They have the gameness and the other at- 
tributes that make race horses. 



Daedalion 2:11 by Diablo. 



Sam Gamble saw Dardalion 2:11 for the first time 
while on a visit to tho Mokelumne Stock Farm a f t w 
weeks ago and writes as follows of him: 

"Daedalion 2:11, pacing, is by Diablo 2:09}, that 
twice held the world's record for his sex and age, 
and is the sire of the pacers Sir Albert S. 2:03iJ, 
Clipper 2:06, Diodine 2:10, Diawood 2:11, El Diablo 
2:11}, Tags 2:11£ and many others better than 2:15. 
Daedalion's first dam is Grace (in the great brood- 
mare list, three belter than 2:20), sec oi-d dam in the 
great broodmare list. Daedalion 2:11 is not only a 
very fast horse, but he is bred for a sire, through his 
sire and dams being producers. He represents eight 
producing dams in his veins. Take his general make- 
up, conformation, head, muscle development and 
gait, and there is nothing but death or lack of op- 
portunity can prevent him from being one of our 
foremost sires of great all-round horses. If he should 
betaken now and placed in a competent trainer's 
hands he has a chance to equal or beat all records 
that are represented in his veins through his great 
prod uc'ng ancestors. He is as sound, as tar as my eye 
can judge, a- the day he was foaled. It was my first 
opportunity to look him over closely, aEd I was 
amazed to find such a grand lookirg and prospective 
speed-producing sire hidden away from the public. 
Judging by his first few foals he is surely a coming 
sire of great speed, and as to his taking a record of 
2:05 or better I believe it is in his hide." 

Daedalion is to be sold at Fred H. Chase & Co. s 
salesyard on Thursday evening next. 



Polo and Pony Racing Association. 

Announcement is made from the headquarters of 
the Burlingame Country C!ub of the organization of 
the California Polo and Pony Racing Associatii d, 
with tho following well known men as officers: Char!, s 
W. Clark, pre>ident; Francis J. Carolan, first vice- 
president, Rudolph Sprecnels\ second vice-presidei 1: 
Th.imas A. Driscoll, secretary ;R. M. Toblr, treasure i ; 
directors— the foregoing and R. L. Bettner, E. W. 
Boe*eke, T. H. Dudley, C. S. Maud, Joseph S. Tobin 
and J . L. Colby. 

The object of the association is to encourage and 
promote the game of polo and pony racing in Cali- 
fornia. It is believed by the promoters that the move- 
men t will result in unusual interest in these sports, 
and that polo teams from England, Hawaiian islai ds 
and possibly from the East will participate in seme of 
the big events scheduled for the season. 

The first of these is a five day polo and pony racing 
tournament, to be held at Del Mo'nte, beginning on 
February 12th. Alternate days will be given to the 
two sports, and about $1000 in purses and several 
valuable cups will be awar ded. At the conclusion 1 f 
those matches ponies and players will repair to Bur- 
lingame, where a like series of sports will be he Id 
under siinllar conditions. These will begin in 
February I7th and be concluded on the 22d , Washing- 
ton's birthday. 

What promises to be the most elaborate and pre 
tontious event of the season, however, will be the 
polo tourjament for the championship of the Pacific 
Coast, to be played at Burlingame. It will begin on 
March 18th and continue daily until finals are playid 
off. By that time all available polo players will have 
arrived, and it promises to eclipse in magnitude any 
similar event ever held in California. 

Litigation Over a Stake. 

A decision rendered by the Board of Appeals of the 
American Trotting Associatii n at its nctnt mtdirg 
in Chicago has resulted in litigation in the Feder al 
Courts, the outcome of which will be watched wi Ih 
interest by horse ownersevery where. Noah T. Wood 
is the plaintiff and the defendant is the Terre Haule 
Trotting Association. Mr. Woods made an entry in 
a futurity steke of $10,000, opened by the Indiana 
organization in 1900. for foais of that year to trot in 
1903. Before the time came to trot the race the 
Terre Haute Trotting Association tendered to Mr. 
Wood the amount he had paid in as entrance money 
and notified him that the race had been declared off. 
He refused to accept this settlement, and shipped his 
trotter to Terre Haute, appearing on the track at the 
time originally set for the contest, and claiming first 
money in the stake. Failin g to obtain it he appealed 
to the turf court, and when that tribunal sustained 
the association he brought an action in the United 
States District Court in Michigan. It is said the 
association offering the stake refurdid to all nomina- 
tors, making the final payment on June 1, 1903, the 
full amount paid in by them, but retained the forfeits 
received from other nominators who failed to make 
the last payment. Horsemen generally take the view 
that the association has no right to retain this for- 
feit money, the entrance fees in a stake being regarded 
aB a trust fund to which the stakeholder acquires no 
title. The right to declare off a stake race is also 
denied, though it has been done on more than one 
occasion. 

A Good Horse at Auction. 



New Surrey, U rst class, with pole and shafts, canopy 
top, 1} inch rubber tire, turn under, elegantly 
trimmed. Original price $420, can be bought at 
Kenney Manufacturing Company, 531 Market street, 
San Francisco, for $225. New lot of McMurray carts 
just arrived — 1904 models. * 



On the front page of this issue of the Breeder 
and Sportsman is a photo-engraving of Mr. I. L. 
Borden's good gelding N. L. B. by Diablo. N. L B. 
ifl a pacer with good gait and good manners, and in 
uny competent trainer's hands can get a very low 
mark. He was trained and raced as a two-year-old, 
defeating the best of his age that were out that year, 
among them Volita 2:15',, Rey del Diablo 2:14|, Dak en 
D. 2:16.1 and others. He took a two-year-old record 
of 2 : 2 1 A . During the years he has been raced N. L. 
B. has been compelled to meet aged horses and com- 
pete in races where the heats were usually below 2:15. 
He has won many second and third moneys during 
that time and been separately timed several miles in 
better than 2:15. As a road horse N. L. B. is rated 
among the good ones, as he is perfectly mannered and 
can be driven by anyone. He has the best of disposi- 
tions, is a good prompt driver and can speed at a 2:10 
gait. He will make some one a high class road or 
matinee horse and should be able to win money racing. 
His breeding is excellent a9 his dam was by the well 
known pacing stallion Washington, that had a record 
of 2:20, and his second dam by the horse Skenandoah, 
formerly called Kentucky Hunter. N L. B. will go 
to the high bidder at the Chase sale in this city next 
Thursday evening and the buyer will get a high class 
horse. 



January 9, 1904] 



5 



Notes and News 



Palo Alto colt sale next Thursday evening. 



Myron McHenry will have Dan Patch again next 
season. 

Of the eleven now performers to the credit of Direct 
2:05$ six are trotters. 



It will pay to breed good trotting stock as long as 
rich stakes are offered^ 

Broodmares should have regular exercise all winter, 
either in a lot or in the harness. 



The Roman 2:091 by McKinney, is at Memphis, in 
charge of his former trainer, Dick Benson. 



Quite a number of mares have already been booked 
to Searchlight 2:03} for the season of 1904. 



The Board of Stewards of the Grand Circuit will 
meet at Cleveland, January 20tb, to fix dates for the 
meeting of 1903. 

Secretary C. A. McCully talks of giving dash racing 
a thorough trial at Brighton Beach's Grand Circuit 
meeting next August. 



Baron Wilkes' fee will be $150 for next year, and as 
there are no broodmares at Maplehurst Farm, the 
public will have all his services. 



The latest news about the green trotter by Sidney 
D'lloo, owned by J. H. Brown of Detroit. Mich , is 
that his owner has refused an offer of $7 000 for him. 



The American Horse Breeder has renewed its $10,000 
Futurity. The renewal is for mares bred in 1903, to 
be raced when their produce are two and three years 
old. 

Budd Doble contracted a severe cold and was con- 
fined to his bed at his home in Alameda several days 
last week, but is now able to be up and around as 
usual. 

O. J. Salisbury, capitalist of Salt Lake, and brother 
of Monroe Salisbury, is at the Rose Hotel, Pleasan- 
ton, with his daughter, on a short visit to look at the 
horses. 

The Fasig-Tipton Company will open a branch 
office in Lexington, Ky., to be in charge of W. S. 
Bunter, at present acting as treasurer of the 
company. 



Doug Thomas, the Kentucky breeder and trainer, 
wants to match Katherine A. 2:14 against any other 
trotting four-year-old out in 1904, Sadie Mc 2:1 1 1 
preferred. 

They are three Rey Directs to be sold by Fred H. 
Chase & Co. January 14th. Two are coming three- 
year-olds and the other a two-year-old. They are all 
very promising youngsters. 



If you want a well bred colt or filly that will increase 
in value attena the Palo Alto sale on the 14th inst. at 
Fred H. Chase ft Co 's salesyard . These are the last 
of the famous Palo Alto bred horses. 



Chas. A. Durfee has consigned two mares by Mc- 
Kinney 2:11} out of Stemwinder, dam of Directum 
2:05}, to the Chase sale next Thursday evening. They 
should make great broodmares, and are sold to close 
a partnership. 

Manos, a bay gelding, three-years-old by Altivo, 
dam Mann, the dam of Mendocino 2:19}, is to be sold 
next Thursday evening at the salesyard of Fred H. 
Chase & Co. He is broken single and double and a 
good prospect. 

Secretary John J. Kelly of the Monterey Agri- 
cultural Association writes that the association will 
give a fair and race meeting at Salinas this year. 
The date has not yet been selected but it will proba- 
bly be some time during the early fall. 



Tom Bonner has consigned a handsome bay gelding 
by Seymour Wilkes to the Chase sale next Thursday 
evening. This is a nice large horso. 15.3, broke single 
and double, and not afraid of anything. He can show 
a 2:40 gait and is an excellent roadster. 



Acting Secretary Miller of the State Agricultural 
Society writes that the Sacramento track is in ex- 
cellent condition at the present time and the lessees 
state that they will keep it so. Quite a number of 
horses are in training there and within a few weeks 
the number will be doubled. 



When E. E. Smathers starts on his automobile trip 
around the world next month all his trotters and 
pacers will be sent to Louisville, Ky., in charge of 
George W. Spear, to be wintered and trained for the 
campaign of 1904. Mr. Smathers does not expect to 
return in time for the spring driving season, and his 
horses may not be seen on the speedway again until 
the close of the Grand Circuit. Lord Derby 2:05} and 
Billy Buoh 2:07} are now turned out at a stock farm 
in New Jersey. Mr. Smathers says Lord Derby is as 
sound as a bell, and still believes the son of Mambrino 
King to be as fast as any horse he owns, not excepting 
Major Dvlniar. 



It is reported that the managers of the Western 
Horse Show Association are planning to offer un- 
usually rich prizes for next year's exhibitions. St. 
Louis, it is said, will hang up $50, 0(H) for the harness 
and saddle horses; Chicago aDd Kansas City will give 
$40,000 each, and Louisville's prize list will foot up 
$30,000. 

A Vermont horseman writes that Agitato 2:09 raced 
in his proper class — the free for all— at Sandy Hill, 
N. Y., and Cambridge, N. Y., last summer. It has 
been hinted that Agitato might have been started in 
slow classes some time last summer, but our Vermont 
correspondent's information seems to indicate that 
those hints had no basis in fact. 



The San Francisco Driving Club will hold matinee 
racing on the speedway in Golden Gate Park on Sun- 
day January 24th. Thore are already nineteen horses 
entered, and it is expected a half dozen more will be 
named to start. They will be classified according to 
the speed they can show at the present time and 
several lively contests will result. 



Charlie Spencer and F. J. Fallman of Walnut Grove 
have recently purchased from R. F. Thisby the two- 
year-old bay colt Sir Robert, entered in the Pacific 
Breeders F'lturity 16000 stake for foals of mares bred 
in 1901. Thiscoltis by Nusbagak, sireof Aristo2:17$, 
winner of both the Occident and Stanford Stakes of 
1902, and his dam is Hilda Rose by Dawn. 



The last of the Palo Alto Stock Farm horses will 
go under the hammer at Fred H. Chase & Co's sales- 
yard 1732 Market street, this city, on Thursday 
evening next, January 14th. Don't miss this sale. 
Eighteen of as high class yearlings as were ever bred 
on the farm will go to the highest bidder. They are 
mostly by McKinney and Nutwood Wilkes. 



Ed Appel, of Rochester, N. Y., has purchased three 
likely prospects for next season's campaign. One is 
by Sable Wilkes 2:18, out of the former trotting 
champion Alix 2:03); another was sired by Hand- 
spring 2:18} out of Atlanta, the dam of Alix, and tbo 
other was sired by Sable Wilkes out of the great 
trotting mare Martha Wilkes 2:08 by Alcyone. 



Pulling trotters to avoid fast records becamo so 
common in Russian harness racing a year or two ago 
that the driving clubs at St. Petersburg and Moscow 
discarded the system of classifying horses according 
to their records and substituted a new plan of classi- 
fying them according to their winnings. The scheme 
is said to work well and it will probably remain in 
force. 

One of the best prospects in California is the brown 
colt Johnny McKenzie by McKinney 2:11}, dam Babe 
by Ferdinand, that C. A. Durfee has consigned to the 
sale at Chase's salesyard on the 14th of this month. 
Johnny McKenzie is a brown gelding foaled 1901, and 
is eligible to all the leading stakes in California this 
year. He is a square trotler and a good prospect. 
He is to be sold to close a partnership. 



Mr. Geo. O. ZUlgitt, who recently romoved to 
Ioglewood, California, from North Dakota, is the 
owner of a mare whose mane is so long that it drags 
on the ground several feet when it is permitted to 
hang loose. The mare is used as a buggy animal 
and her mane kop- braided and "d one up" carefully. 
She is the mother of a colt foaled last spring that has 
inherited the heavy hirsute adornment of its dam and 
its mane and tail already nearly touch the ground. 



Mr. A. T. Baker of San Jose, recently purchased in 
the East and has had shipped to this State a two-year- 
old colt by Bolward 18321, son of St. Bel 5336. The 
dam of the colt is by Mediator, a son of Happy 
Medium. He is a royally bred fellow and said by 
those who have seen him to be a vory fine individual. 
Mr. Baker owns the stallion Red Nuttle and has a 
five-year-old mare by him out of Maudsford by 
Abbotsford that is one of the best prospects in Santa 
Clara county. 

James W. Rea of San Jose, proprietor of the Ven- 
dome Stock Farm and owner of a prize winning herd 
of Holstoin cattle, was recently appointed a delegate 
to the National Live Stock Association's annual con- 
vention to be held at Portland, Oregon, from the 1 1 th 
to the 15th of this month, but owing to bin time being 
so occupied with business ho was compelled to decline 
the honor. Mr. Rea highly appreciated the compli- 
ment but expects to open his new railroad line be- 
tween San Jose and Los Gatos on January 15th, so 
his time will be fully occupied . 



Dan Leiginger has added throe new ones to his 
string. One is a brown pacing stallion that is a full 
brother to the double gaited horso that tho late Tom 
Keating won many good races with — Ottinger 2:09J, 
trotting and 2:1(1 pacing. This stallion is owned by 
Mr. EichotT of Ripon, this State, and Dan says he 
has every indication of being a genuine race horse as 
he is naturally very fast, and a better headed ono is 
seldom seen. The other two new ones are both Mc- 
Kinneys — one being a five years old trotting gelding, 
the other a yearling. 

At tho breeding farm of C. A. Arvedson, three 
miles north of College City, Ed Donnelly, tho well 
known and successful trainer, has in his stable the 
stallion Sutter 2:18} by Noonday and two two year 
olds by him, Rettus and Lady Sutter, that are show- 
irgupwell. The boys that are training for the two 
year old divisions of the Breeders Futurity for this 
year must take tho College City contingent into their 
calculations as Ed says they will have to trot better 
than 2:20 if thny beat him, if Rettus don't go wrong. 
Mr. Arvedson has several other colts by Sutter that 
jook like the real goods he Bays. 



Last week Dan McCarty, of this city, purcbastd 
from Father Cooper, of San Mateo, a live year ola 
chestnut pacing mare by K. O 'Grady's stallion Hait 
Boswoll, that Is considered one of It e 
in California for tho slow pacing class of 1904. Mr. 
O'Grady broke this mare and gave her a few months 
work last year at the track on the Hay wards place at 
San Mateo, and drove her a mile in 2:15$ very handily. 
Mr. McCarty has sent the mare to Josli AiberttOD at 
Pleasanton who will put her in training for the races 
of 1904. 



That good son of Director, Delphi 2:12}, sir* of 
Toppy 2:10, owned by Chas. Whitehead, wi.l make 
the season of 1904 at the Salinas track. The Director 
family is the great race winning family and as the 
years go by its representatives grow more numerous 
among the big money winners. Mr Whitehead, who 
has leased the Salinas track, tells us that tho 
Directors of the association there are putting up a 
new windmill and a 10,IK)0 gallon tank on tho grounds 
This makes throe windmills and tanks that will pro- 
vide water for the track and Mr. Whitehead sees no 
reason why it should not be one of the very best 
tracks in California for training purpose*. 



There will be plenty of ice racing in Chicago this 
winter as two matinees will be held each week at 
Washington Park and a loving cup has been given 
by the Chicago Riding and Driving Club. Thore 
will be a cup or trophy contested for on every Wed- 
nesday and Saturday afternoon during the ice racing 
season. An organization has been formed which is 
known as the West Chicago Ioe Speedway Associa- 
tion and this club will promote racing on the ice 
speedway just west of Garfield Park. Thomas M. 
Hunter has been elected president, and the racing 
will be conducted on same principles as a race track 
and with the same respect for rules. The harness 
horse lovers should have enough racing this winter 
to satisfy their desires. 



John E. Madden says: "You ask me if Lou Dillon's 
record will ever be broken? I would say 'sure, 'as I be- 
lieve like our race horses, trotters are being bred speed- 
ier every year. Tracks are faster, sulky appliances and 
equipments are hourly being improved upon and with 
continued improvements in the breed of trotters, 
twenty years from now 1:50 may be the champion 
mark and two minute horses by no means of unusual 
appearance. I look also for an expansion in trotting 
horse racing in the near future. The brilliant per- 
formances of stars like Lou Dillon, Major Deliar and 
Cresceus in one season, with Dan Patch and Prince 
Alert among the pacers as side issues, has given the 
game a great boost, and the next few years will see 
much new capital invested in light harness horses." 



There is in the hands of Treasurer N. T. Smith of 
the PacificCoastTrotting Horse Breeders Association 
at the present time the sum of $15,462 Of this sum 
over $13,000 is stake money belonging to the different 
futurity stakes established by the association. The 
figures show that the Breeders Association is in a very 
healthy state and the condition of things should be 
very gratifying to the members. This association 
has kopt the interest in harness racing alive in Cali- 
fornia when, through adverse legislation and other 
causes thore was danger of its being entirely discon- 
tinued. The prospects for a good racing season for 
1904 are very bright, and the futurity stakes to be 
decided at the Breeders meeting will be big features 
of the season's racing. 



Horsemen who were on the Northern circuit in 1903 
stato that one of the greatest prospects among the 
green trotters seen there during the racing season 
was H. H. Helman's Roy Benton. He is a sixteen 
band horse, a good looker and one of the best gaited 
ones ever seen on a track. Boy Benton was bred In 
California and is by Benton Boy 2:16}, sire of Uncle 
Johnny (3) 2:19}, and his dam is Antera by Anteeo, 
second dam Debonair, dam of Ravanetta 2:27 by 
Sultan, third dam Ferguson mare by Belmont 64. 
Roy Benton is now six years old, and has had Borne 
work during his four and five-year-old form. He 
worked a full mile in 2:18 last year over the slow track 
at Irvington, with a half in 1:06, and is expected to 
trot very close to 2:10 this year. Mr. Helman will race 
him in the slow classes this year. 



Among the horses consigned to the Blue Ribbon 
sale at Cleveland last May was Marengo King, bred 
and owned by the Santa Rosa Stock Farm. He had 
a record of 2:29}, which was no where near the 
measure of his speed, aad probably was not considered 
by the purchaser, J H. Brown, of Detroit, Michigan, 
woo paid $3100 for him, as tho splendid individuality 
of the stallion, with his royal breeding, were worth 
tbo money. A full brother to Marengo King will bo 
sold at the salepyard of Fred H Chase <V Co., 1732 
Market street, in this c/.ty on Thursday evening next. 
This is By Mack, consigned by Mr. James Le Baron 
Smith of this city. By Mack was named by the late 
Henry Pierce, of the Santa Rosa Stock Farm, who 
bred him, and who considered him one of tho beat 
horses ever bred on that celebrated farm He Is by 
tho great McKinney 2:1 1 j, Bire of twenty-seven 2:15 
performers all with race records, and his dam Is the 
$10,000 mare By By, own sister to Lockheart 2:08$ 
and dam of Marengo King 2:29} by Nutwood 600, sire 
of the dams of 214 in tho list; second dam Rapidan, 
dam of Lockheart 2:08$, Rapid 2:22} and Capt. Mac 
2:29, by tho great Dictator,- sire of Director 2:17, etc.; 
third dam Madam Headly, dam of Export Princo 
2:13}. by Edwin Forrest; fourth dam by Mambrino 
Chief II, etc. By Mack Is a very handsome young 
horse, and should be a very valuable horso to breed 
to, as his individuality and breeding aro superb. In 
the bands of any live man bo should earn a large 
sum In the stud every year. 



6 



[JANUAKY >.', 1904 



The Horse's Coat. 

The general appearance and comfort of a horse is 
greatly influenced by his coat, says a writer in a 
Canadian agricultural journal. A well groomed horse, 
like a Well dressed man or woman, Is pleasant to look 
upon. The coat of a horse, to a great extent, gives 
evidence of care or neglect. While a nice, fine, silky, 
glossy coat adds much to the general appearance of a 
horse, it requires a great deal of attention to keep it 
thus, especially during the late fall and winter 
months. Some horses have, naturally, much shorter 
and finer coats than others, and while good breeding 
has someinfluencein this respect, we frequently notice 
a vast difference in animals of the same breeding. 
Why this is we cannot determine, and simply are 
compelled to accept it as a fact. The age of the ani- 
mal has an influence; we notice that it is not usually 
possible to keep the coat oi young or very old animals 
in aj fine a condition as those of animals between 
adulthood and old age. Horses under five years or 
over twenty do not usually give the same returns for 
care and attention, as regards coat, as do those be- 
tween these ages. In the former case it may be that 
the more or less general fevered state of the system 
consequent upon dentition has an influence upon the 
coat, and in the latter case we are probably justified 
in assuming that the general vitality of the animal is 
more or less impaired, and the coat, as well as other 
parts of the anatomy, evidences the decrease of 
vitality. 

We frequently hear people say that they do not 
like grey or white horses because they are so hard to 
keep clean. A grey horso is no harder to keep clean 
than a dark colored one, but 6tains or dirt show much 
more plainly and it requires more attention to make 
him look clean. We often notice when a team consists 
of a grey and a dark colored horse and when care is 
taken to have them look well, that on close examina- 
tion the grey has a finer, shorter and cleaner coat 
than his mate, from the fact that stains, etc , show so 
plainly on him that he receives more grooming. 
During the summer months there's little trouble ex- 
perienced in keeping a horse's coat nice, but as the 
weather becomes cold in the fall, nature demands 
that the horse be clothed accordingly, and there is a 
stronger tendency to growth of hair, and we may say 
that the coat loses its gloss in proport'on to the length 
of hair. In order, then, that we may retain the re- 
quired gloss, we must take what measures we can to 
prevent the growth. In order to do this, we must, in 
addition to thorough and regular grooming, avoid un- 
necessary exposure, and when exposure is necessary, 
provide artificial protection when the animal is not 
in motion. As regards grooming, a horse should be 
thoroughly groomed twice daily ; not merely the ex- 
ternal surface of the coat brushed and rubbed, but 
the hair agitated thoroughly to the roots by working 
the comb or brush both with and against the grain of 
the hair, in order to remove dust, dandruff, etc., and 
thereby prevent any occlusion of the openings of the 
sweat glands, and keep the coat free from dust. 

Whenever a horse has been driven, ridden or 
worked hard enough to produce perspiration, it 
would be better to rub him until dry. This is the 
way in which race horses are U6ed, and a well cared 
for race horse certainly presents a perfect coat. This, 
however, is not practicable in the ordinary stable. It 
would require more help than the average horse- 
owner can afford or is willing to keep. The next best 




WILL NOT SCAR OR BLEMISH. 

GOMBALLT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

Is the safest and most effective lotion or 
blister for ailments xU 

HORSES and CATTLE 

and supersedes all cautery or firing. 

It is prepared exclusively by J. E. Gom- 
bault, ei- Veterinary Surgeon to the French 
Government Stud. 

As i> HIMAN KCMEDY for Rheu- 
matism. M|>riiln», Mori: I hi out, etc., II 

i- Invaluable. 

Every bottle of Caustic Balaam sold U 
Warranted to irlve satisfaction. Price 81. SO 
per bottle. Sold by dru[r[fi*t>, or went by ex- 
press, .-harfreti [.aid. with full illrertiotis for lta 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc- Address 

TH UTRiKCK-VILLIUS COMPiSY Clenlud, Ohio 



thing to do is to clothe him warmly, place him in a 
comfortable stall, excluded from draftF, and when 
his blanket has become moist from the perspiration, 
remove it and supply a d ry one. When he is thor- 
oughly dry, a g«od grooming will remove the dried 
perspiration, free the matted hair and remove all 
dust and dirt. Of course, horses must not be loft out 
in the fields or paddocks all night when the weather 
is liable to be cold, if you wish to preserve short coats. 
The ad visability of wearing clothing in the stable is 
open to discussion, but if the stable be not very com- 
fortable, we think blankets should be worn, and even 
in warm stables we think light clothing should be 
worn, as it prevents dust from entering the coat. In 
all cases in cold weather, when the animal is not in 
action, whether standing in the stable or standing 
outside in harness, his body should be clothed suf- 
ficiently to protect him from the wind and cold, and 
when it is necessary to drive or work a horse in a 
rain or snow storm, it is better he should be covered 
with a waterproof covering, in order to keep the skin 
d ry and warm. 

Cold and dampness stimulate the growth of hair, 
in order to protect the skin; hence, when we are par- 
ticular about the coat we must, as far as possible, 
avoid this stimulation. When horses are being used 
for slow work not demanding sufficient exercise to 
tend to perspiration, in very cold, though dry, 
weather it is wise to wear blankets under the harness 
to protect the skin. In most cases, when reasonable 
care is exercised on the lines above mentioned, we 
will succeed in maintaining a short, sleek coat on our 
horses, but there are exceptions. As stated, age has 
an influence, and there are certain individuals that 
from some unaccountable reason or predisposition, 
will grow a long coat, notwithstanding the most care- 
ful attention. I know a horse that during the sum- 
mer season has an ordinary coat, that in the fall, de- 
spite all possible attention and care, will grow long 
and curl, until it very strongly resembles the coat of 
a well cared for water spaniel, the most peculiar coat 
I ever saw on a horse. This occurs every fall with 
this horse. There are a few individuals with this or 
somewhat similar characteristics, and, of course, all 
that can be done in such cases, if we insist upon hav- 
ing a short coat, is to clip. 



Fun on the Road in New York. 

Mr. P. F. Moulton, of Menlo Park, who is at present 
in New York, writes the Breeder and Sportsman 
that there is lots of fun on the roads in the snow 
there at the present time. In a ride through Sevenih 
Avenue, and on the Riverside Drive and in Central 
Park Mr. Moulton saw many of the crack speedway 
horses. Homewaid 2:13J, bred by R. O. Newman, of 
Visalia, was driven on the Harlem road by his owner, 
Isaac Fleming, and looks like a king of the snow 
horses for this winter. Stepping down the hill from 
Highbridge at a clip which sent the snow flying 
higher than the heads of his rivals, Homeward beat 
Claus Bohling's Indian Jim 2 : 1 5 J, and George A. 
Coleman's Kingwood 2:17 J in clever style. 

Nathan Straus was out behind the famous Cobwebs 
2:12 jogging along in company with A. B. Gwathmey, 
who drove Senator Mills 2:l2j(, the hor6e that out- 
trotted Queen Wilkes in the brushes last fall. 

Among the others 6een on Seventh avenue and in 
Central Park were Colonel Alexander Newburger, 
who drove Smilax 2:21}, a chestnut pacing mare by 
Sidney; Arthur Lape with a black trotting mare by 
Guy Wilkes; Dr. W. C. Gilday with the chestnut 
mare Pet; Andrew Freedman driving a handsome 
black cob; F. G. Schmidt with the lightning pacer 
Mercury Wilkes 2:14}; W. G. Leland with Diablo and 
mate, a pair of stately black trotters; J. L. Dodge 
with the pacing mare Precious 2:1 5f ; Michael Reid 
driving his bay trotter Farmer. 



Hallie Hinges and Harry Marvin. 

Kntrios are evidently coming in very satisfactorily 
for J. L. McCarthy & Son's sale at Portland, if we 
may judge by their ad. this week. The Mayview 
Stock Farm, of Garfield county, Washington, has 
consigned thirty head, including the fast pacing 
mare Hallie Hinges 2:18J, who good judges say can 
pace a mile in 2:12. Among other consignments is 
Harry Marvin 2:221, a fast trotter and an ideal road 
horse. 

This sale will be a grand opportunity for California 
breeders and horsemen to sell some well-bred brood 
mares and young racing prospects for the high-dollar, 
as this sal« is the "blue ribbon" event of the north in 
the spring, and horsemen and breeders from all over 
the northwest gather at this sale and if a horse will 
not bring bis value at Portland in March there is no 
use looking further for a buyerin the northwest. The 
catalogue is filling; up rapidly and those contemplat- 
ing making a consignment to this sale should do so at 
once. For entry blanks and all particulars write 
J. L. McCarthy & Son, Room 8, Hamilton Bldg., 
Portland, Ore. The entries close February 1, 1904. 



Producing Male and Female Lines. 

In an extended pedigree of a horse, the pedigree of 
the sire and of the sir«s of the first, second, third, 
fourth and fifth dams and so on down for a few 
generations, constitute the major blood lines as well 
as the proximal and most recent in the individual 
traced. This being true, one may reasonably infer 
that such are the blood lines most worthy of con- 
sideration in estimating the value of a pedigree, 
especially when a good prospect is sought for breed- 
ieg purposes. This inference, however, brings us to 
the antithesis of the Bruce Lowe theory of breeding. 
Instead of placing a high estimate upon a female line 
of descent that traces to a particular dam remotely 
distant.it considers of greatest value the producing 
qualities of sires of each and all of the r'ams as far 
down as we care to trace the pedigree in the female 
line. Since the pedigree of the sires of the dams 
make up the pedigree of nearly the whole, the 
qualities of these sires must also make up the quali- 
ties of nearly the whole, if t he qualities of a sire ani 
of bis male and female ancestors can be transmitted 
to his offspring. 

Making deductions from the foregoing premises 
prompted the writer several years ago to attempt to 
formulate for his own use a theory of breeding run- 
nors and trotters, which perhaps even at this late 
date may bo worthy of some consideration in study- 
ing a pedigree. The plan or theory involved the 
tracing out of what may be termed potent producing 
sirelinesor chains, each individual that serves as a 
link in any producing male ancestral chain to posteit. 
the following qualifications: His sire, himself and a 
son (or daughter) must have produced a high class 
performer who won one or more of the most im- 
portant events. Suppose, for illustration, that the 
Derby, Oaks and St. Ledger are adopted as the 
standard stake events of England. Then to form a 
link in an ancestral producing chain or sire line a 
horse must possess the following qualification*: Bis 
sire, himself, and his son (or daughteri must have 
each produced a winner of the Derby, Oaks or St. 
Ledger- The greater the number of generations 
through which these qu»lifications in a siiec&n bo 
met, the greater the number of links will there be in 
the sire chain, the longer will be the chain and the 
greater or more valuable will be its potency or 
momentum of superior producing qualities to be 
carried through succeeding generations. To numeri- 
cally state and calculate this producing or "bret ding 
on" quality, each individual in an ancestral prod uc- 
ing chain or sire line could be given a number or 
index which wonld indicate the generation that Le 
represents, and the higher this number the better 
should be his producing and "breeding on" qualities 
(see appended table of sire lines). 

For illustration let the breeding qualities of Star 
Ruby, Golden Garter and Candlemas be calculati d 
and compared as to sires and as to sires of the first 
five generations of the female line of ancestry. 

STAR RUBY. 



Sire, Hampton 9 

First dam, by Bend Or 10 

Second dam, by Macaroni 7 

Third dam, by TbeCure 

Fourth dam, by Birdcatcher 6 



6)32 
5* 

Average for each;generation ot Hist six. 
GOLDEN GARTER. 



Sire, Bend Or 10 

First dam, by Wenlock 

Second dam, by Stockwell 8 

Third dam, by Don John 3 

Fourth dam, by Priam 6 

Fifth dam, by Filho-da-Puta ) 



6)28 



H 

CANDLEMAS. 

Sire, Hermit 8 

First dam, by Marysas 8 

Second dam, by Gladiateur 

Third dam, by Sir Hercules 3 

Fourth dam, by Emilius 5 



6)24 
4 

According to this calculation of male or sire lii.es 
the potency or "breeding on" qualities in Star Ruby, 
Golden Garter and Candlemas would be in the ratios 
32, 28 and 24, or 5J, 4$ and 4. Of course the greater 
tbn number of dams from the first down, in the female 
line, that can show sires who form links in producing 
sire chains the more value should be given the pedi- 
gree, notwithstanding the fact that the averageindt x 
of calculation may be a small figure. 

Having considered the producing male lines of the 
sire and the sires of each of the dams for several gen- 
erations down, there should also be considered and 



JANUARY 9, 1904 



7 



estimated or calculated the producing male lines in 
the dams of these sires. The dams of the sires should 
ha ve a strong producing female line for several gener- 
ations down, each matron in this female lino having 
for her male or sire line a strong prod ucing chain of 
several links. To estimate the value of producing 
male lines in the sire of the individual and in the sires 
of his several dams without estimation at the same 
time of the male lines in the several dams of these 
sires, would be wholly inconsistent with the theory 
herein set forth ol gaining a momentum of "breeding 
on" quality through producing sire lines or chain 9 
extending through several generations without an in- 
terruption of transmitting potency. An intarruption 
for one gene -ation of this transmitting potency should 
break the chain, for, like any chain with a weak link, 
it is broken into two so far as ability to overcome re- 
uistance isconcerned— a new start point being required . 

A producing female line, extending through even a 
few generations without interruption, is not worthy 
of full consideration unless each matron in this female 
line, or all of the matrons in it, trace in the male line 
for at least a few generations through only potent 
producing ancestors. However, a producing female 
line, tracing in the confluent male lines through ex 
clusively potent producing ancestors for several gen- 
orations back, is entitled to the very highest estimate 
of value. In so far as the Bruce Lowe theory of 
breeding can be made to conform to these conditions 
it is doubtless a safe guide of probably even superior 
merit; but its application without a producing female 
line, the matrons in which trace in the male line for 
several generations through only producing sires, 
would deprive it of the very conditions necessary to 
its consistency. A strong female producing line once 
established should pass on and lengthen through suc- 
ceeding generations without defilement from a non- 
producing sire line; otherwise what may be imagined 
the momentum of superior producing quality will be 
resisted, if not interrupted or lost, and a new start 
point will be required. While untried sires, so far 
as breeding and individuality are concerned, may be 
worthy of opportunity for mating with producing 
female lines, yet failures in such opportunity have in 
the past caused the irredeemable loss to the breeding 
industry of an innumerable collection of good female 
lines. Why not preserve and perpetuate the strong 
chain of producing female line and lengthen it by 
mating with only the sires that produce extra well 



and trace for several generations through a strong 
producing sire line, and compel the young sires, how- 
ever they may bo bred, to demonstrate and prove 
their p-od ucing qualities beforo they arc allowed to 
mate and possibly contaminate the last generation of 
a producing female line? 

A form for writing a pedigree that will facilitate the 
study of sires in a female line is given herewith and 
marked 13. 

At tho present day the selection of both matron and 
sire so bred that each and all of the ancestors for 
severai generations back have produced extra well, 
does not relieve the breeder who would strive to 
excel from the necessity of studying the problems of 
breeding. If any breeder thinks thct he has ideas 
worthy of some consideration, he should bring them 
in some form to the attention of other breeders. 
Hence my excuse for offering the ideas herein ex- 
pressed. 

In the table appended an effort has been made to 
trace out the producing male or sire line, based upon 
the producing of winners of the Derby, Oaks and St. 
Leger, each 6ire being required to fiulfill the follow- 
ing qualifications: His sire, himself and one of his 
sons having produced a winner of tho Derby, Oaks or 
St Leger. Bach individual in a sire line is given a 
number or index, written at the head of the column, 
which represents hi9 generation in the sire line. 
Doubtless thero are many errors in the table, as most 
of the information for tabulation was derived from 
sale catalogues, almanacs and catalogues of stock 
farms. The table is also incomplete, since it was 
made several years ago and does not include sires 
that are entitled to place in it through tho perfor- 
mance of their produce in winning these events during 
recent years. My only excuse in offering for publica- 
tion this incorrect and incomplete table is that time 
for its completion and correction could not be obtained 
from business, that it is necessary to explain much 
written in this article and that its publication may 
induce some one to compile a more correct and com- 
plete table of the same kind. The publication of cor- 
rect tables based upon the following standards of 
qualification would be of great value to breeders: 

First — The sire himself, his sire, and his son, to 
have produced winners of the Derby, Oaks or St. 
Leger. 

Second — The sire himself, his sire, and his son or 
daughter to have produced winners of the Derby, 



Oaks or St. Leger. 

Third— The sire himself, his sire or dam, and his 
son or daughter to have produced winners of tho 
Derby, Oaks or St. Leger. 

Fourth— The dam horself.herdamand her daughter 
to have produced winners of the Derby, Oaks and St. 
I .cger. 

Fifth— Tho dam herself, her dam or sire and her 
daughter or son to have produced winners of the 
Derby, Oaks or St. Leger. 

The writer does not wish U understood that for 
breeding purposes ho would reject a sire who Is a 
good producer, but does not happen to form a link in 
the sire chains based upon tho producing of winners 
of tho Derby, Oaks or St. Leger. The producing of 
winners of as high class as tho winners of those events 
should be given equal consideration as evidence of 
transmitting potency. 

The fact that most good sires trace to Eclipse 
through producing male lines, compels us to favor 
for a sire such as trace in the sire line to this ancestor, 
l'roducidg potency would probably bo intensified If 
thes're's first dam also traced in the male line to 
Kclipse. As reasons lor this assertion would requlia 
considerable space, if clearly stated, they are omitted. 

C. E. Farnum, M. D. 

San Francisco, Jan. 7, 1904. 



Flying Fox's Service Fee $3000. 

M Edouard Blanc, the owner of famous Flying 
Fox, has just issued a curious pronunciamento. In 
future the high-priced son of Orme and Vampire will 
be permitted to serve only ten mares besides his own- 
er's, at a fee of $3000 each, with the remarkable pro- 
viso that none must come from any French breeders' 
establishment. Whether the wonderful success of 
the first crop of Flying Fox youngsters has made M. 
Blanc desirous of having none of them to oppose bis 
home raised ones in France, or whether bis intention 
is to make the fame of his sire as world-wide as pos- 
sible, is hard to say. \t any rate, his last move gives 
the much-talked-of-horse another record, for his fee 
now exceeds the $2500 for which the Duke of Port- 
land still lets a favored few use his pet, St. Simon. 
What is more, M. Blanc will experience no difficulty, 
for a couple of years at least, in finding breeders will- 
inp and even anxious to pay the high price he 
demands. 



Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feet 



A Producing Male Lines. — The standard of producing qualification of each sire line here found in this table is, viz.: 
must have produced winners of the Derby, Oaks and St. Leger: 



Tho sire himself, his sire and his son 



Eclipse Pot-8-os. 



3 4 
.Waxy Whalebone 



5 6 7 
Camel Touchstone Newminster . . . 



Hermit. 



Mercury 

King Fergus 



.Gohanna 

.Benlngbrough 



Whisker 

Woful 

Election 

Oolumpus 

Hedle 

Orvllle .... 



Sir Hercules 



Deferoe 
Wintonlan 



» 10 

. . .Triston 
" Trappist 

" " LordClifden Petrarch 

•' " Adventurer 

" Hampton 

" Orlando Maroyas 

" Ithurial Longbow 

.Birdcatcher The Baron Stockwell Doncaster Bend Or. 



Faugb-a-Ballagh 



Chanticleer 
Saunterer 



Monarque 
Rataplan 



Lord Lyon 
Blair Atbol 



1 1 



Ormonde 
Kendal 



Overton 
Hambletonlan. 



Whltelock 



Catton Mulatto 

Priam 

.Blacklock Voltaire. 



Muley 

Emillus 

Pohlo 



.Voltlguer. 



Dtok Andrews, 
n 

Weatherblt.... 



Don Qulxotte. 
Volunteer 
Meteor 
Alexander 
.Tramp 



.Beadsman. 



.Cervantes 



.Vedette Qalopln St. Simon 

" Speculum 



Sterling 

Hetman Platoff 
Fllho-da Puta... 
King Tom 
Scottish Chief 
Scud 

Herod 



.Isonomy 
.The Cossack 
.The Colwlck 



Don John 
Lottery 
Rosloruolan 
The Palmer 



.Woodpecker. 



.Buzzard Sellm Sultao BayMlddlcton The Flying Dutchman 



Highflyer Sir Peter. 



Castral 
Rubens 
.Walton. 



Langcr Eplrus 

.Pantaloon 

.Partisan Sweetmeat 



Dutch Skater 
The Rover 



Florizal 



Matohem... 
Melbaurne . 
Comus 



Phenomenon 

Justice 
Philander 
Drone 
.Alfred 

.West Australian 



Walnut 

St. George 

Rockingham 

Delphlns 

Fidget 

.Stripling 



Cardinal York 



Phantom 



... Macaroni 
Parmeslan 

Vonlson Kingston 

(llaucus 



Octavlan 



son of 


Doncaster 9 by 


Stockwell 8 and 


Kougo KoBe 


by 


Thormanby 




Newminster 7 . " 


Touchstone '1 " 


Seclusion 


11 


Tadmore (Ion) 




Longbow 8 " 


Ithurial 7 " 


Legerdemain 


11 


Pantaloon 5 


1 1 


The Baron 7 " 


Birdcatcher 6 " 


Pocahontas 


1 1 


Glencoe li 


11 


Camel 5 " 


Whalebone 4 " 


Banter 


11 


Master Henry (Orville 4) 


11 


Dick Andrews 1 " 


Joe Andrews " 


dam 


11 


Gohanna 3 (Mercury 2) 



B. IMP. IRIS by Bend Or 10 

1st* dam, Shotover by Hermit 8 

2nd dam, Stray Shot by ToxophiliteO 

3rd dam, Vaga by 8tockwell 8 

4th dam, Mendicant by Touchstone 6 

5th dam, Lady Moore Carew by Tramp 2 



8 



[January 9, 1804 




ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



1 



Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 



Winners of Field Trials, 1903. 

Twenty-five field trial meetings for last year as 
against thirty meetings in 1902 bhows a slight falling 
off in the number of club trials run. Several clubs 
which held meetings in 1902, for various reasons, 
were unable to bring about a meeting last season. 
There, is, however, no lack of enthusiasm for the 
sport on the part of breeders and admirers of the 
field dog. We give our readers, commencing in this 
issue, a list of the winning performers and other data 
of interest for the field trials of 1903: 

PACIFIC COAST FIELD TRIAL CLUB-Bakers- 
field, Cal., January 12. H. S. Humphreys, judge; 
Albert Bet/, secretary. 20tb annual trials. 

Derby, January 12, 13. Purse $480. Jus. E. Terry 
cup and $240 to first, $144 to second and $90 to third. 
Entrance $5, $5 second forfeit, $10 additional to start; 
38 Dominations, 15 starters (10 English Setters, 5 
Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Kilgarif (Orion-Mary Lou), white, 
black and tan English Setter dog; J. E. Terry owner, 
W. B. Coutts handler. 2 Nelly Bang (Senator 
P. -Manitoba Belle), white and lemon Pointer bitch; 
J W. Flynn owner. W. B. Coutts handler. 3 Mar- 
garette(Cuba'sXep-Jingo'sBagpipe), white, black and 
tan Pointer bitch; Stockdale Kennels owner. R. M. 
Dodge handler. 

All-Age Stake, January 14-16. Purse $300. West- 
ern Field cup and $150 to first, $90 to second, $00 to 
third. Entrance $10, $10 additional to start; 15 nom- 
inations, 12 starters (9 English Settersand 3 Pointers) 

Winners — 1 Peach Blossom (Count Gladstone IV- 
Peach Mark), white, black and tan English Setter 
bitch; W. W. Van Arsdale owner, C. H. Babcock 
handler. 2 Dr. Daniels (Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II), 
while and liver Pointer dog; \V. W. Van Arsdale 
owner, C. H. Babcock handler. 3 Cuba Jr. (Cuba 
of Kenwood-Florida), white and liver Pointer dog: 
Stockdale Kennels owner, R. M. Dodge handler. 

Members' Stake, January 10 W. W. Van Arsdale 
cup to first, Club cups to second and third; $10 to 
start; 6 entries (5 English Setters, 1 Pointer); owners 
handlers. 

Winners— 1 Lady (Count Gladstone IV-Peach 
Mark), white and orange English Setter bitch; J. E. 
Terry owner. 2 Count's Mark (Count Gladstone 
IV-Peach Mark), white, black and tan English Setter 
dog; W. W. Van Arsdale owner. 3 Northern 
Huntress (Joe Cumming-Mecca II), white, black and 
tan Erjglie>b Setter bitch; T. J. A. Tiedemann owner. 

UNITED STATES FIELD TRIAL CLUB— Grand 
Junction, Tonn., January 19. 14th annual trials. 
Theodore Sturges and T. T. Ashford, judges. 

Derby, January 19, 20, 21. Purse $600. $300 to 
first, $200 to second, $100 to third. 62 nominations 
(50 English Setters, 12 Pointers); 28 starters (22 
Setters, 6 Pointers). 

Winners— 1 Alford's John (Dave Kent-Cleade), 
white and liver Pointer dog; Salamonie Kennels 
owner, J. T. Jones handler. 2 Iroquois (Tony 
Boy-C'ido), white, black and tan English Setter dog; 
Avent & Duryea Kennels owner, J. M. A vent handler. 
3 Question (Why Not-Agnes Wakefield), white, black 
and tan English Setter bitch; P. Lorillard owner, 
Charles Tucker handler. 

All-Age Stake, January 22, 23, 24. Dogs placed first 
in Continental, Eastern or U. S. All-Age barred. 
Purse $500. $250 to first, $150 to second, $100 to third; 
44 nominations (37 English Setters, 7 Pointers); 27 
starters (23 Setters, 4 Pointers). 

Winners— 1 Geneva (Tony Boy-Lena Belle), white, 
black and tan English Setter bitch; P. Lorillard 
owner, Charles Tucker handler. 2 Mohawk (Tony 
Boy-Countess Meteor), white, black and tan English 
Setter dog; Avent it Duryea Kennels owner, J. M. 
Avent handler. 3 Prince Rodney (Lady's Count 
Gladstone-Jessie Rod field), white, black and tan 
English Setter dog; C B. Cooke owner, Charles 
Askins handler. 

GEORGIA FIELD TRIAL ASSOCIATION— 
Waynesboro, Ga., January 20. Inaugural trials. 
Col. Renfroe, judge. 

Members' Slake, for dogs owned in the State of 
Georgia only; 18 starters (10 English Setters, 7 Point- 
ers and 1 Irish Setterl. 

Winners — 1 Pride's Queen (Cincinnatus' Pride- 
Queen Antonio), black, white and tan English Setter 
bitch; W. S. Elkins, Jr., owner and handler. 2 
Big Casino (Lady's Count Gladstone- Queen of Dia- 
monds), white, black and tan English Setter dog; P. 
M. Essig, owner end handler. 3 Dave B. Jr. 

(Dave B.-Bess), white and black English Setter dog; 

F. I. Stone, owner and handler. 4 Blade ( 

), white and black Pointer dog; F. W. Mc- 

Rae, owner and handler. 5 Grady ( ), 

lemon and white Pointer doer; Dr H. B. McMaster, 
owner and handler. 6 Jerry S. (Dock S. -Julia 

Crane), white and liver Pointer dog; J. E. Miller, 
owner and handler. 

TEXAS FIELD TRIAL CLUB— Stockdale, Texas, 
Januaiy 19. Inaugural trials. Capt. A. J. Ross, 
judge; T. A. Ferlet, secretary. 

Derby, January 19. 3 starters (2 Pointers and 1 
English Setter). 

Winners — 1 North Jetty (Young Rip Rap-Shaw's 
Flash), white and black Pointer dog; R. W. Shaw 
owner, John T Mayfield handler. 2 Jingle Coin 
(Jingo's Coin- Dottie Rip Rap), white and liver Pointer 
dog; E. S. Fishback owner, John T. Mayfield handler. 
3 Tona's Rod (Marie's Sport's Rod-Tona), white, 



black and tan English Setter dog; J. M. Morgan 
owner, Johi> T. Mayfield handler. 

All-Age Stake, January 20. 7 starters (5 Pointers 
and 2 English Setters) 

Wiuners— 1 JiDgo's Coin (Jingo-Dofs Pearl), white 
and liver Pointer dog; F. L. Denison, owner, John T. 
Mayfield handler. ' 2 Alberta Joa II (Alberta Jot- 
Ripo), white and black Pointer dog; R. W. Shaw, 
owner, John T. Mayfield, handler. 3 Kate Stone 
(Ripstore-Kate Jingo), white and liver Pointer bitch; 
F. L. Denison, owner, John T. Mayfield, handler. 
4 Jolly Sport (Pride of Fannin-Blue Gem Bess), white 
and black Setter dog; C. F. Koehler, owner and 
handler. 

Members' Stake, January 20. 4 starters (3 Pointers 
and 1 English Setter). 

Winners— 1 Alberta Joe II (Alberta Joe-Ripo), 
white and black Pointer dog; R. W. Shaw, owner 
and handler. 2 Kate Stone (Ripstone-Kate 
Jingo), white and liver Pointer bitch; E. L. Denison, 
owner and handler. 3 Count Danstone II (Count 
Danstone-City Girl), white, black and tan English 
Setter dog; A. A. Bogen, owner and handler. 4 
Nellie Mac (Roy Jingo-Belle of Naso), white and 
liver Pointer bitch; C. F. Koehler, owner and handler. 

State Championship Stake, January 21. 2 staiters, 
Pointers. 

Winners— 1 Jingo'sCoin (Jingo-Dot's Pearl), white 
and liver Pointer dog; F. L. Denison, owner and 
handler. 2 Four Spot (Sir Royal Dan-Queen of 
Lilitz), white and black Pointer dog; Dr. E. L. Deni- 
son, ov?ner, John T. Mayfield, handler. 

NATIONAL FIELD TRIAL CHAMPIONSHIP 
ASSOCIATION — Grand Junction, Tenn., January 26. 
7th annual trials. Open to any dog which has won a 
place in any open field trial. Purse $500 and cham- 
pionship cup. Messrs. Theodore Sturges and Hobart 
Ames, judges. Eight starters (7 English Settersand 

1 Pointer). 

Winner — Geneva (Tony Boy-Lena Belle), white, 
black and tan English Setter bitch; P. Lorillard 
owner, Charles Tucker handler. 

EASTERN FIELD TRIAL CLUB— Thomas ville, 
Ga., February 2. 24th annual trials. Messrs. N. 
Wallace and Eric Hambei judges; S. C. Bradley, sec- 
retary. 

Derby, February 2, 3, 4. Purse $900. $500 to first, 
$300 to second, $100 to third ; 70 nominations, 52 Eng- 
lish Setters, 18 Pointers; 24 starters (15 English Set- 
ters and 10 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Sure Shot (Lady's Count Gladstone- 
Jessie Rod field ) black, white and tan English Setter 
dog; J. W. Canaday owner, Charles Askins handler. 

2 Iroquois (Tony Boy-Cado), white, black and 
tan English Setter dog; Avent & Duryea owners, J. 
M. Avent handler. 3 Jessie Rodfield's Count 
Gladstone (Lady's Count Gladstone-Jessie Kodfield), 
white and orange English Setter dog; Jesse Sher- 
wood owner, Er Shelley handler. 

All-Age Stake, February 5, 6, 7. Pur6e$800. $400 
to first, $250 to second, $150 tothird; 59 nominations, 
38 English Setters, 21 Pointers; 25 starters (18 Setters, 
7 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Geneva (Tony Boy-Lena Belle), white, 
black and tan English Setter bitch; P. Lorillard 
owner, Charles Tucker handler. 2 Pretti Sing 

(Tony Boy-Nellie C-), white, black and tan English 
Setter bitch: C. K. Brown owner, D. E. Rose handler. 

3 Sport's Count Danstone (Count Danstone-Sport's 
Maid), white, black and tan English Setter dog; 
William Brett owner, Charles Askins handler. 

Subscription Stake, February 9. Purse $500; $300 
to first, $150 to second, $50 to third. Subscription $50. 
14 8tarters(ll English Setters, 3 Pointers). 

Winners— 1 Pretti Sing (Tony Boy-NellieC), white, 
black and tan English Setter bitch. C. K.Brown 
owner, D. E. Rose handler. 2 Tony Man (Tony 
Boy-May Blue), white, black and tan English Setter 
dog. Avent & Duryea owners, J. M. Avent handler. 
3 Sport's Count Danstone (Count Danstone-Sport's 
Maid), white, black and tan English Setter dog; Wm. 
Brett owner, Chas. Askins handler. 

NEBRASKA FIELD TRIAL ASSOCIATION— 
O'Neill, Neb., August 18. 2nd annual trials Messrs. 
J. W. Baughn and Wm. Elliott, judges; M. H. Mc- 
Carthy, secretary. 

Derby, August 18-19. Purse $500. $150 to first, 
$125 to second, $100 to third, $75 to fourth, $50 to fifth. 
Entrance, $5 to nominate, $10 additional to start; 78 
nominations, 32 starters (19 English Setters, 13 
Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Plain Rex (Dan Bo-Selma S.), white, 
black and tan English Setter dog; Thomas Griffiths, 
owner, Nat B. Nesbit, handler. 2 Lad's Meally 
(Lad of Jingo-Margaret), white and liver Pointer 
bitch; W. P. Austin, owner, A. B. Caldwell, handler. 
3 Brett's Sport (Sport's Count Danstone-Pride's 
Belle), white and black English Setter dog; Dr. E. R. 
Hickerson, owner. Ed. Garr, handler. 4 Osseeo 
(Count Rodstone-Marie's Dot), white, black and tan 
English Setter dog, Dr. E. R. Hickerson, owner, Ed 
Garr, handler. Equal 5th Dervish Girl (Robert 
Count Gladstone-Fleety A.), white, black and tan 
English Setter bitch: American-Llewellin Kennels, 
owner, W. W. Updike, handler. Equal 5th 
Chesterfield Sue ( Jack-Tignor's Vic), white, black 
and tan English Setter bitch; J. C. Tignor, owner, 
W. D. Gilchrist, handler. 

All-Age Stake, August 19, 20, 21. Purse $500. $150 
to first, $125 to 3econd, $100 to tbird, $75 to fourth, 
$50 to fifth. Entrance, $5 to nominate, $10 additional 
to start; 67 nominations, (42 English Setters, 24 
Pointers, 1 Irish Setter); 42 starters (27 Setters, 14 
Pointers, 1 Irish Setter). 



Winners— 1 Prince Lyndon (Marie's Sport-West 
Wind), black, white and tan English Setter dog; 
JohnCowley owner, ErShelley handler. 2 Alpine 
Lad (Lad of Jingo-Fanny Flash), white and liver 
Pointer dog; Charles Proctor owner, Edward Garr 
handler. 3 McKlnley ( Hickory Gladstone-Thelma 
S.), white, black and tan English Setter dog: Thomas 
Griffiths owner, Nat B. Nesbitt handler. 4 Dad ; s 
Frank (Mat Ellis-Belle Wilson), white and orange 
English Setter dog; Nitta Yuma Kennels owner, Ed 
ward Garr handler. 5 Blue Danstone (Count 
Danstone-Fairland Dot), blue belton English Setter 
dog; T. A. Turner owner, W. D. Gilchrist handler. 

SOUTH DAKOTA FIELD TRIAL ASSOCIA- 
TION— Sioux Falls, S. D. Messrs C. B. Whitford, 
L. Struehmer, and E. H. Gregory (first day), judges 
4th annual trials. 

Derby, August 25. Purse, entrance money. 32J 
per cent to first, 27i per cent to second, 22$ percent 
to third, 17.1 per cent to fourth; 38 nominations, 17 
starters (5 Pointers, 12 English Setters). 

Winners— 1 Rap's Pointer (Young Rip Rap-Miss 
Pointer), white and liver Pointer dog; Er Shelley 
owner and handler. 2 Plain Rex (Dan B.-Thelma 
S.), white, black and tan English Setter dog; Thomas 
Griffithsowner, Nat B. Nesbitt handler. d Sport's 
Dan (Marie's Sport-Spotty Gladstone), black, white 
and tan English Setter dog; Austin Albaugh owner 
and handler. 4 Lad's Meally (Lad of Jingo-Mar- 
garet), white and liver Pointer bitch; W.P.Austin 
owner, A. B. Caldwell handler. 

All-Age Stake, August 28. Purse, entrance money, 
four moneys, divided as in the Derby; 64 nominations; 
16 starters (5 Pointers, 11 English Setters). 

Winners— 1 McKinley (Hickory Gladstone-Thelma 
S.), white, black and tan Rnglish Setter dog; Thomas 
Griffithsowner, Nat B. Nesbitt handler. 2 Cap- 
tain Jack (Colonel R. -Spot's Girl), white, black and 
tan English Setter dog; A. M. Masters owner; Jack 
Gude handler. 3 Alpine Lad (Lad of Jingo-Fanny 
Flash), white and liver Pointer dog; Charles h roctor 
owner, Edward Garr handler. 4 Lad of Jingo 
(Jingo-Pearl's Dot), white and liver Pointer dog; W. 
P. Austin owner, A. B. Caldwell handler 

Subscription Stake, August 29. Purse, entrance 
money, three moneys, 50, 30 and 20 percent; $10 to 
nominate, $15 additional to start, 7 starters (2 
Pointers, 5 English Setters). 

Winners— 1 McKinley (Hickory Gladstone-Thelma 
S.), white, black and tan English Setter dog; Thomas 
Griffiths owner, Nat B. Nesbitt handler. 2 Cow- 
ley's Rodfield's Pride (Rodfield-Sport's Belle), white 
and orange English Setter dog; John Cowley owner, 
Er. Shelley handler. 3 Sport's Count Danstone- 
Sport's Maid), white, black and tan English Setter 
dog; William Brett owner, Charles Askins handler. 

MINNESOTA-NORTH DAKOTA FIELD TRIAL 
CLUB— Huron, S. D., Messrs. N. Wallace, E. D. 
Magoon and Dr. W. A. Moore, judges. 2nd annual 
trials. 

Derby, September 1-2. 26 starters (17 English 
Setters, 9 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Jessie Rodfield's Count Gladstone 
(Lady's Count Gladstone-Jessie Rodfield), white and 
orange English Setter dog; Jesse Sherwood, owner, 
Er. Shelley, handier. 2 Speck's Jingo Boy (Young 
Rip Rap-Speck 's Jingo), white and liver Pointer dog: 
Mrs. Charles Hyde, owner, J. T. Jones, handler. 

3 Copper Coin (Lad of Jingo-Hal's Belle), white and 
liver Pointer dog; W. P. Austin, owner, A. B. Cald- 
well, handler. 4 Lad's Meally (Lad of Jingn- 
Margaret), white and liver Pointer bitch; W. P. 
Austin, owner, A. B. Caldwell, handler. 

All-Age Stake, September 4. 31 starters (19 Eng- 
lish Setters and 12 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Alford's John (Dave Kent-Cleade), 
white and liver Pointer dog; Faust & Dickey owners, 
J. T. Jones, handler. 2 McKinley (Hickory Glad- 
stone-Thelma S ), white, black and tan English 
Setter dog; Thomas Griffiths owner, Nat B. Nesbitt 
handler. 3 Lad of Jingo (Jingo-Dot's Pear)), 
white and liver Pointer dog; W. P. Austin owner, A. 
B. Caldwell handler. 4 Alpine Lad (Lad of Jingo 
-Fanny Rush), white and liver Pointer dog; Charles 
Proctor owner, Edward Garr handler. 

WESTERN CANADA KENNEL CLUB— La Salle, 
Man. W. C. Lee, judge. 

Derby, August 31. 8 9tarters (4 English Settei s and 

4 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Wassa (Neighbor-Belle), white, black 
and tan English Setter bitch; Fred McArthur owner, 
Joseph Lemon handler. 2 Sirdar Trinket (Young 

Rip Rap-Lass of Jingo), white and liver Pointer bitch; 
George A. Caruthers, owner and handler. 3 
Lanark 's Lad (Tony Boy-Pink Tea), white and orange 
English Setter dog; F. W. Scott, owner and handler. 

All-Age Stake, August 31. 11 starters (6 Pointers 
and 5 English Setters). 

Winners — 1 Judge (Bang Ill-Manitoba Belle), white 
and liver Pointer dog; Hamber & Code owners, Eric 

Hamber handler. 2 Fleete( ), white 

and liver Pointer bitch; George F. Carruthers, owner 
and handler. 

Subscription Stake. 5 starters (3 English Setters, 

2 Pointers). 

Winners— 1 Fan Light( ), white, black 

and tan English Setter bitch; R. J. White, owner and 
handler. Runner-up Fifae (Bang Ill-Manitoba 

Belle), white and black Pointer bitch; G. A. Car- 
ruthers, owner and handler. 

MANITOBA FIELD TRIAL CLUB— Carmen, 
Man.. Messrs. W. W. Titus and W. F. Ellis, Derby 
judges; W. W. Titus and H. T. Bevan, All-Age and 
Championship Stakes judges. 

Derby, September 7 Purse $325. $150 to first, $100 
to second, $50 to third, $25 to fourth. $5 forfeit, $10 
additional to start; 27 starters (22 Setters, 5 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Uncle Sam (Uncle B -Minnie R.), white, 
black and tan English Setter bitch; C. K. Brown 
owner, D. E. Rose handler. 2 Shawnee (Tony 
Boy-Cado), white, black and tan English Setter 
bitch; Avent & Duryea Kennels owners, J. M. Avent 
handler. 3 Chippewa (Tony Boy-Lady Rachel), 
white, black and tan English Setter dog; Avent & 



January 9, 1904J 



(The #veebev cmb j&pmtoman 



8 



Duryea Kennels owcers, J. M. Avent handler. 
Equal 4th Cam's Pink (Uncle B -Cam), white, black 
and tan English Setter bitch; Joseph Lemon owner, 
D E. Rose handler. Equal 4th Blue Belle (Mo- 
hawk-Bonnie Lit), black and white English Setter 
bitch; John Wootton owner, J. M. Avent handler. 

All-Age Stake, September 10. For Setters and 
Pointers which had not won tirst place in the Eastern, 
Continental, United States or Manitoba trials in any 
previous yea i . Purse $325. $150 to tirst, $100 to sec- 
ond, $50 to third, $25 to fourth. $5 forfeit, $10 addi- 
tional to start; 27 starters (21 English Setters and 
Pointers), 

Winners— 1 Portia (Sport's Gath-Paosy B. ). white, 
b'ac'ic and tan English Setter bitch; Paul Kainey 
owaer, D. E. Rose handler. 2 Prince Rodney 

(Lily's Count Gladstone-Jessie Rodfield), black, 
white and tan English Setterdog; C. B Cooke owner, 
D E. Rose handler. 3 Tony Man (Tony Boy-May 
Blue), white, black and tan English Setterdog; Avent 
iV Duryea Kennels owners, J. M. Avent handler. 
Equal 4th Alambaugh (Dash Antonio-Lark), white, 
black and tan English Setter dog: Charlottesville 
Field Trial Kennels owner, C. E Buckle handler. 
Equal 4th Ortiz Lad ( Rod field -Graco G. Darling), 
white and lemon English Setter dog; Dr. I. C Shoup 
owner, D. E. Rose handler. 

Champion Stake, September 11th. Open only to 
placed does. Purse, entrance fees and gold medal. 
$5 forfeit, $10 additional to start; 7 starters (4 English 
Setters and 3 Pointers). 

Winner — 1 Mohawk (Tony Boy-Countess Meteor;, 
white, black and tan English Setter dog; Avent \- 
Duryea owner, J. M. Avent handler. 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST FIELD TRIAL CLUB— 
C lupeville, Whidby Island, Washington, September 
28, 90. J. A. Balmer, judge. 4th annual trials. 

Darby, 20 nominations, 14 starters (11 English Set- 
ters and 3 Pointers). 

Winners— Uncle Jim (Count Whitestone-Sport'e 
May Belle;, white and orange English Setterdog; J. 
A. Peebles owner, C. G. Kyle handler. 2 Valita 
(California Bell Boy-Rod s Lark,, white, black and 
I4n Eoglwb Setter bitch; John Schumacher owner, 
W. B. Coutts handler. Equal 3 Cincinnatus' Nat 

Cincinnatus' Pride-Ruth T. Eton, white, black and 
tan English Setterdog; E. B. Roy owner. Equal 
;-i Count Wnitestone's Chief (Count Whitestone- 
Sport's May Belle , orange belton English Setter dog: 
N. A Weedeo owner, Hans Hansen handler. 

All-Age Stake, 13 nominations. 8 starters (7 English 
Sellers and 1 Pointer). 

Winners — 1 Lady (Count Gladstone IV-Peach 
Mirk), white and lemon English Setter bitch; 
•I . E. Terry owner, W. B Coutts handler. 2 Fleet 
(0.ishing Fleet-White Bawn), white and lemon Eng- 
lish Setter dog; Mr. Paulsell owner, Hans Hansen 
handler. 3 Kilgarif (Orion-Mary Lou), white, 
bUck and tan English Setter dog; J. E. Terry owner, 
W. B. Coutts handler. 

Members' Slake, 5 starters (4 English Setters, 1 
Pointer). 

Winners— 1, 2 Hick's Lad, Hick's Bat (Doc Hick- 
Woodcraft), English Setter dog aid bitch; J. W. 
Considine owner. 3 Doc Montez (Roy Montez- 

Diina Montez;, English Setter dog. C. Wening 
owner. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA FIELD TRIAL CLUB— 
-S.iveston, B. C, Thomas Plimley, judge. Inaugural 
trials. 

Darby, October 8. Purse 40, 30, 20 and 10 per cent 
of entrance. 8 starters (0 English Setters, 2 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Roy'sLady (Roy Montez-Victoria Belle 
II), white, black and tan English Setter bitch; Miss 
W. E. Divie owner, C. H. Sweetzar handler. 2 
Texada(lroquoisChief-Tony's Destiny), white, black 
and tan English Setter bitcb; N. F. Lyne, owner and 
handler. 3 Criterion (Ricko-Xellie B. ), lemon 

and white English Setterdog; Dr. Findley owner, C. 
H. Sweetzar handler. 4 Vancouver Shot (Sport 
IV-Perrot's Daisy), black and white Pointer dog; L. 
Wilbaud owner, C. H. Sweetzer handler. 

All-Age Stake, October 10. Purse, same division 
as in Darby. 10 starters and 2 absent (9 English 
Setters, 1 Irish Setter) 

Winners— 1 Val's Belle (Bain's Flash-Val's Lady), 
white, black and tan English Setter bitch; C. Cocking, 
owner and handler. 2 Val's Rose (Ricko- Val's 
Lady), white, black and tan English Setter bitch; 
James Brooks owner, C. H. Sweetzer handler. 8 
Tony's Destiny (Tony Boy-Sport's Destiny), blue 
belton English Setter bitcb; N. F. Lyne owner, C H. 
Sweetzer handler. 4 Lady Roberts, (Grouse P.- 
Tobe's Val), white, black and tan English Setter 
bitch: H. Abbott owner, X. F. Lyne handler. 

SPORTSMEN S FIELD TRIAL CLUB— Clare, 
Mich. Inaugural trials. 
Derby, October 27. 12 starters (all English Setters). 
Winners — 1 Clairvoyant(Cowley's Rod field's Pride- 
Phoebe- W hitestone;, white and orange English 
Setter bitch; E. H. Waller owner and handler. 2 
Gath's Dorrit (Sport's Gath-Little Dorrit), white, 
black and tan English Setter bitch ; E. D McQueen 
owner, Thoman Morris handler. 3 Phoebe's Rod 
(Cowley's Rodfield's Pride-Phoebe Whitestone), 
white and orange English Setter dog; L. N. Hilsen- 
degen owner and handler. 4 Dike's Diko (Fair- 
land Dike-Top Mark Lady), white, black and tan 
English Setter dog; E. C Smith owner and handler. 

All-Age Stake, October 29. 18 starters (15 English 
Setters and 3 Pointers). 

Winners— 1 Lou Rod field (Rod field -Gypsey A. 
Gladstone), orange, white and tan English Setter 
bitch; W. M. Tanner owner and handler. 2 Clair- 

voyant (Cowley's Rodfield's Pride-Phoebe White 
stone), white and orange English Setter bitcb; E 11. 
Waller owner and handler. 3 Rose M. (Kel's 
Carter-Scrapper), white, black and tan English 
Setter bitch; F. H. Sherer owner and handler. 
Equal 4th Phoebe's Rod (Cowley's Rodfield's Frlde- 
Phoebe's Whitestone); L N. Hilsendegen owner and 
handler. Equal 4th Tonv's Nell (Tony's Mark- 
Nellie F.), white and black English Setter bitch; A 
J. Smith owner, E. H. Waller, handler. 



MONONG A HELA FIELD TRIAL CLUB— Robin- 
son, III. N. Wallace and W. S. Bell, judges; A. C. 
Peterson, secretary. 9th annual Minis. 

Members' Slake, October 27. Prizes: gold, silver 
and two bronze medals. 7 starters (4 English Setters 
and 3 Pointers) 

Winners— 1 Lad of Jingo (Jingo-Dot's Pearl), while 
and liver Pointer dog; W. P. Austin owner, A. B. 
Caldwell, handler. 2 Hal's Hope ( Harold Skim- 

pole-Nellie Dly), while, black and tan English Setter 
dog; Bel) «V Anderson owners, A. C. Peterson, hand- 
ler. 3 May Fly (May Prince-Glory ), white and 
orange English Setterdog; G O, Smith owner, A. B. 
Caldwell handler. 4 Mar's Chan (Lady 's Count 
Gladstone-Lontonio); W. S. Bell owner, A. C. Peter- 
son handler. 

Derby. October 27. Purse $000, Gold medal and 
$25(1 to first, silver medal and $200 to second, bronze 
medal and $100 lo third, bronze medal and $50 to 
fourth. Entrance $5, $5 and $10 to start; 02 nomina- 
tions, 30 starters (25 English Setters and 11 Pointers). 

Winners— 1 Shawnee (Tony Boy-Cado), white, 
black and tan English Sutter bitch; Avent A - Duryea 
Kennels owne r , J. M. Avent handler. 2 Uncle 

Sam (Uncle B. -Minnie H.), while, black and tan Eng- 
lish Setter dog; C. K. Brown owner, D. E. Rose 
handler. 3 Young Lad of Rush (Lad of Rusb- 
Gorhara's Dorothy), liver and white Pointer dog; 
Charles Gorham owner, Edward Garr handler. 4 
Itaska (Prime Minister-Vouma), white, black and 
lan English Setter bitch; Avent ft Duryea Kennels 
owner, J M. Avent handler. 

All-Age Stake, October 30. Purse $600. Same 
division, medals and entrance as the Derby; 02 nom- 
inations, 30 starters I 25 English Setters, 11 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Mohawk (Tony Boy -Countess Meteor), 
white, black and tan English Setter dog; Avent «V 
Duryea Kennels owners, J. M. Avent handler. 2 
Alford 's John (Dave Kent-Cleade), white and liver 
Pointer dog; Foust <V Dickey owners, J T. Jones 
handler. 3 Sport's Count Danstone (Count Dan- 
stone-Sport's Maid); William Brett owner, Charles 
Askinshandler. Equal 4th Prince Rodney(Lady's 
Count Gladstone-Jessie Rodfield), white, black and 
tan English Setter dog; C. B. Cooke owner, D. E. 
Rose handler. Equal 4th Alpine Lad (Lad of 
Jingo-FanLy Flash), white and liver Pointer dog; 
Charles Proctor owner, Edward Garr, handler. 

OHIO FIELD TRIAL CLUB-Washington C. H , 
O. Geo. R Haswell and Major J. H. Taylor, judges. 
0th annual trials. 

Members' Stake, November 2. 9 starters (5 Eng- 
lish Setters and 4 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Tip Fauster (Jingo's Pearl-Nellie 
Fauster), white and lemon Pointer bitch; Dr J. G. 
F. Holston owner, T. Houston handler. 2 Lemons 
(Freckle D -Baby Gladstone), white and lemon Eng- 
lish Setter bitch; Harry L. Brown owner and handler. 
3 Ripstone's Jingo CRipstone-Jingo's Lady), white 
aud black Pointer dog; C. T. Phillips owner, T. 
Houston handler. 4 J. C. (Young Jingo-Eve), 
white and liver Pointer dog; F. R. Huntington owner, 
T. Houston handler. 

Derby, November 4. Purse $500; $250 to first, $150 
to second, $100 to third. 12 starters (8 English Setters 
and 4 Pointers.) 

Winners — 1 Itaska (Prime Minister-Youma), white, 
black and tan English Setter bitcb; Avent & Duryea 
Kennels owner, J. M. Avent handler. 2 Hickory 
(Mohawk-Bonnie Lit) white, black and tan English 
Setter dog; Avent & Duryea Kennels owner, J M 
Avent handler. 3 Algonquin (Prime Minister- 
Clip Wind'em), white, black and tan Euglish Setter 
dog; Avent ft Duryea Kennels owners, J M Avent 
handler. 

All-Age Stake, November 7 Purse $500; $250 to 
first, $150 to second, $100 to third. 10 starters (9 
English Setters and 7 Pointers). 

Winners- 1 Tony Man (Tony Boy-May Blue], 
white, black and tan English Setter dog; A vent & 
Duryea Kennels owner, J M Avent handler. 2 
Alford's John [Dave Kent-Cleade], white and liver 
Pointer dog; Foust ft Dickey owner, J. T. Jones 
handler. Equal 3 Sport's Count Dan6tone [Count 
Danstonc-Sport's Maid], white, black and tan Eng- 
lish Setter dog; J T Jones handler. Equal 3 
Iroquofs [Tony Boy-Cado], black, white and tan 
English Setterdog; Avent & Duryoa Kennels owner, 
J NI Avent handler. 

MICHIGAN FIELD TRIAL CDUB— Greenville, 
Mich., November 2. Messrs.. W. J. Baugbn and J. 
G. Armstrong, judges; C. D. Stuart, secretary. 

Derby, 9 starters (7 English Setters, 2 Pointers). 

Winners— 1 Daisy Baughn (Petrel's Count-Fly 
Rod), blue belton English Setter bitcb; F. L. Holmes, 
owner and handler. 2 Clairvoyant (Cowley's 
RodBeld's Pride-Phoebe Whitestone). white and 
orange English Setter bitcb; E. H. Waller, owner and 
handler. Equal 3d Phn-be's Rod (Cowley 's Rod- 

field's Prlde-Pbeube Whitestone), white and orange 
English Setter dog; Louis Hilsendegen, owner and 
handler. Equal 3d Gath's Dorritt (Sport's Gath- 

Little Dorrltt), black, white and tan English Setter 
bitch; Dr. E. D. McQueen owner, T. Morris handler. 

All-Age Stake, 10 starters (All English Setters) 

Winners — 1 Don Antonio 1 1 1( Dash Antonio-Eld red 's 
Constance), black, white and tan English Setter dog; 
W. C. Donaldson, owner and handler. 2 King 
Do Do (King B>-Cliperigo), white, black and tan 
English Setter dog; R E Kraal owner, Asher Cady 
handler. Equal 3d Count Holmes (Count 

Diamond-Little Dorritt), white, black and tan English 
Setter dog; C I) Stuart owner. Asher Cady handler. 
Equal 3d Lou Rodfield (Rodfield-Gipsy A. Gladstone) 
white and lemon English Setter bitcb; M W Tanner 
owner, E Pettit handler. 

IN DEPE S DENT FIELD TRIAL CLUB-Robin- 
son. 111. Messrs. /.oil Gaston, S. H Socwell and A. 
Trigg, judges; H. S. Humphreys, secretary. 5th 
annual trials. 

Members' Stake. November 1 1 . For unplaced degs. 
Purse, entrance fees: four moneys, 50 per cent and 
cup to first, 30, ZOanri 10 to next three; 30 nominations, 
22 starters (18 English Setters and 4 Pointers). 



Winners— 1 Fairy's Rod (Fairy's Ben-Flossie 1>« 
laney), white, black and tan English Setterdog; High 
Land Kennels owner, VY H Kerr handler. 2Trlxie 
(Jingo's Two Spot -Busy Bee), white and liver Pointer 
bitch; George I Nunn, owner and handler. 
Madison Rodfield [Rod field -Lady Danstone]'. black, 
white and tan English Setter dog; R R Beardtley 
owner, Max Mlddluton handler. 4 Lady Glasgow 
[Rodfleld-Paul's Daughter], white, black and tan 
English Setter bltoh; W Lee Cook owner, Ed Garr 
handler. 

Derby, November 9. Purse $500, guaranteed. 1200 
to first, $150 to second, $100 to third, $50 to fourth. 
$10 forfeit and $10 loslart; 00 nominations, 20stai tors 
[19 English Sellers and 7 Pointers] 

.Vinners — 1 Flinlstone ' Robert Count Gladstonc- 
Topsy K], white. blac>c and tan English Setter dog; 
American-Llewellin Kennels owner, W W Updike 
handler. 2 Minnesota Joe Jr [Minnesota Joe- 
Sam's Dream], white and black Pointer dog; C C 
! in i k bead owner, 1 H Reginald handler. 3 Pio- 

neer [Count Whlteetonc-Bonnie Doone], white and 
orange English Setter dog; '1 I tu 11 w r Kenmls 
owner. Er Shelley haadler. 4 Osseeo [Count Rod- 
stone-Marie's Dot], white, black and lan English 
Setterdog, Dr E R Hickerson owner, Ed Garr. handler. 

All-Age Stake, November 13. Purse division and 
entrance money same as Derby. 24 starters [14 Eng 
1 is h Sellers and 10 Pointers]. 

Winners— 1 Alford's John [Dave Kent-Cleade], 
while and liver Pointer dog; Foust & Dickey owner, 
Charles Askins handler. 2, Alpine Lad [Lad of 
Jingo-Fanny Flash], white and liver Pointer dog; 
Charles Proclorowner, Eu Garr handler. 3 Jessie 
Hod field's Count Gladttone [ Lady's Count Gladstone 
-Jessie Rodfield], whLe and orange English Setter 
dog: Jesse Sherwood owner, Er Shelley handler 
4 Doctor Daniels [Plain Sam-Dolly D 1 1 ], white and 
liver Pointer dog; California Kennels owner, Charles 
Askins handler. 

INTERNATIONAL FIELD TRIAL CUB-Ruth- 
ven, Ontario. Messrs Thomas Guttridge and J W 
Baughl, judges; W B Wells, honorary secretary. 
15th annual trials. 

Derby, November 10. Purse, entrance fees; four 
moneys, 40, 20, 15 and 10 per cent; $5 forfeit and $5 to 
start; 7 starters (8 English Setters and 1 Pointer). 

Winners — Trixie's Pearl (Sport's Gath-Kingston's 
Trixie), white, black and tan English Setter bitcb; C 
I) Stuart owner, Asher Cady handler. 2 Ruby's 

Lady (Petrel's Count-Fairland Ruby), black, white 
and tan English Setter bitcb; Dr Campeau owner, 
T Poliin handler. 3 Doctor B (Sam T II-Maud 
S), white, black and tan English Setter dog; John 
Huddleston owner and handler. 4 Joe Hawk 
(Duke I-Fly Ann), white and black Pointer dog; A J 
Pickering owner and handler. 

All-Age Stake, 10 starters (8 English Setters and 2 
Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Lou Rodfield [Rodfield Oipsy A Olad- 
stone], white and lemon English Setter bitch; M W 
Tanner owner, C E Pettit handler. 2 Don An- 
tonio III [Dash Antonio-Eldrtd's Constance], blsck, 
white anc tan English Setterdog; E H Nelson owner, 
W C Donaldson handler. 3 Selkirk Solus [Sel- 
kirk Why te-Selkirk Tana], white, black and tan 
English Setterdog; W B Wells owner and handler. 

CONNECTICUT FIELD TRIAL CLUB— Hamp- 
ton, Conn. Messrs H P Emory arid H W EBger, 
Derby judges; Messrs Emory and S A Ellis All-Age 
judges; F N* Smith, secretary. 

Derby, November 10. Purse, entrance fees; four 
moneys. 40, 30, 20 and 10 percent. $5 forfeit and $5 
to start; 11 starters (8 English Setters, 3 Pointers.; 

Winners — 1 Sazarac (Carpenter's Boy-Victorine H), 
white and orange English Sette r dog; J H Hoffman, 
owner and handler. 2 Ledger II (King Cyranc- 
Ledger), wbiteand liver Pointer dog; George H Clark 
owner, H B Tallman handler. 3 Ben Rodfield 

(Rodfield's Count-Rod's Dora), black and white 
English Setter dog; Hutchlns \- Parkinson ownerF, G 

H Parkinson handler. 4 Plain Spot ( ■ ) 

wbiteand liver Pointer dog; A Cooley, owner and 
handler. 

AU-Age Stake, November 11. Purse, entrance fe( t ; 
four moneys, 40, 30, 20 and 10 per cent. $5 forfeit and 
$5 to start; 7 starters (5 English Setters, 2 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Breeze II (American Boy-Red field 's 
Gypsy), black, wbiteand tan English Setter dog ; M 
H Coffin, o'vner and handler. 2 Ruby's Rod 
(Kingston-Mark 's Ruby ), black, white and tan Eng- 
lish Setter dog; W G Comstock, owner and handh r. 

3 Elegante (American Boy-Red field 's Gypsy), white 
and black English Setter bitch ; O D Rcdfleld owner, 
P E Parmalee hanpler. 4 Teddy Kent (Ned 1)11- 
Gypsy), white and liver ticked Pointer dog; ParUir 
Morris owner, H B Tallman handler. 

Members' Stake, November 11. Purse, entrance 
fees; four moneys, 40, 30, 20 and 10 per cent. Forfe It 
$3 and $2 to start; 9 starters (All English Setters] 

Winners — 1 Breeze II [American Boy -Red field 'h 
Gypsy], black, wbiteand tan English Setter dog; M 
H Coffin, owner and handler. 2 Wampanaug 
Chief [Herbert's Lord of the Manor-Horbert'B Ft i i y 
Cjueen], liver and white English Setter dog; W S 
Hawley, owner and handler. 3 ROby's R< d 

[Kingston-Mark 's Ruby], black, white and tnn Vrf - 
lish Setter dog; W G Comstock, owner and bandit r. 

MARYLAND AND DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 
FIELD TRIAL CLUB— Chesapeake Beaeb, Md. 
R Robinson, judge; W R Armstrong, secretary. In- 
augural trials. 

Derbv, November 9. For dogs owned by members; 

4 starters (3 English Setters and 1 Pointer]. 
Winners— 1 Count [Scamp-Polly], wbiteand orange 

English Setter dog: G Pennlman owner and ban 1 • > 
I Bird West [Dash-Bird Wise], white and orange 
English Setter bitcb: Dr J L McCormlck o><n<rand 

handler. 3 Lady Lou [ — -], white, 

black and tan English Setter b'tch; G II Kent owner 
and handler. 4 Rappahannock [1 idad-Sophf ]. 
wbiteand liver Pointer dog; RTF e« ger owner at.d 
handler. 

All-Age Stake, November 11. For dogs owned by 



10 



[January 9. 19C4 



members; 12 starters [8 English Setters, 4 Pointers] 

Winners— 1 Rox [Lady's Count Gladstone-Pink 
Tea], white, black and tan English Setter dog; G L 
Nicholson owner and handler. 2 Mack Ewing 
[Pout's Lloyd-Bessie Hanna], black, white and tan 
English Setter dog; Dr J L McCormick owner and 
handler. 3 Dan C. [Devonshire Dick-Lady Grace 
II], white and black Pointer dog; Dr H F Hill owner 
and handler. 4 Flash of Heathcote [N. D. of 
Heathcote-Topsy], white, black and English Setter 
doe; T Conrad Dodge owner and handler. 

ILLINOIS FIELD TRIAL ASSOCIATION— Rob- 
inson 111. Messrs S R Socwell, W R Green and Dr K 
R Hickerson, judges; W R Green, secretary. 5th 
annual trials. ■ . •«'' "1, 

Members' All-Age Stake, November 16. Purse, 
entrance fees, four moneys, 40, 30, 20 and 10 per cent 
and also silver cup to first. Forfeit $2.50 and $2.u0 to 
start; 14 nominations, 8 starters [all Pointers]. 

Winners— 1 Von 's Jack [Jingo Boy-Cook's Bessie], 
white and liver Pointer dog; O Von hengerke owner 
and handler. 2 Trlxie [Canaday's Two Spot- 
Busv Bee], white and liver Pointer bitch; George I 
Nunu owner and handler. 3 Shotell [ Ben R-r lee 
Go], wh'te and liver Pointer dog; James Pease owner 

and handler. 4 Boone [Keystone Jim ], 

white and liver Pointer dog; John G. Drennan owner, 
and handler. .„ _ 

Members' Dirby, November 16. Purse, etc. v same 
Members' All-Age; 14 nominations, 6 starters Lo Kng- 
lish Setters and 1 Pointer]. 

Winners— 1 Chicago Boy [Robert Count Gladstone- 
Nellie Rolfleld], white and orange Knghsh Setter 
do*- Americtn-Llewellin Kennels owner, James Pease 
handler. 2 Cook's Rodfleld [Lady's Count Glad- 
stone-Hickory Nell], white, black and tan Knghsh 
Setter dog; C C Cook owner and handler. 3 
Lillian O Rod field [Rod field-Glad O'Light]. white, 
black and tin E lglish Setter bitch; Henry Scharman 
owner, K It lUinur handler. 4 Rod's Ruby Rod- 
field [R>dfield-Louise Danstone], white, black and 
tan Biglish Setter bitch. Dr. J. R. Burnett owner 

^Ope!) Derby, November 18. Purse $500. $200 to 
first, $150 to second, $100 to third, $50 to fourth. $10 
forfeit and $10 to start; 63 nominations, 21 starters 
[15 English Setters and Pointers]. 

Winners— 1 Fiintstone [Robert Count Gladstone- 
Topsy K], wh ; te, black and tan English Setter dog; 
American Llewellin Kennels owner, W W Updike 
handler. 2 Oakley Hill's Pride [Oakley Hill- 
Gleam's Daisy], white, black and tan English Setter 
dog; Mrs John Cowley owner, Er Shelley handler. 
3 Plain Rjx [Dan B.-Thelma S.], white, black and 
i in Eiglish Setter dog; Thomas Griffiths owner, Nat 
B. Nesbitt handler. 4 Imperial [Uncle B.-Cam], 
white, black and tan English Setter dog; Joseph 
L»mon owner, D. E. Rose handler. 

Open All-Age Stake, November 19. Purse, moneys 
and entrance same as Derby. 43 nominations, 25 
starters [13 Pointers, 12 English Setters]. 

Winners— 1 Alford's John [Dave Kent-Cleade], 
white and liver Pointer dog; Foust & Dickey owners, 
Charles Askins handler. 2 Prince Rodney [Lady's 
Count Gladstone-Jessie Rodfleld], white, black and 
tan English Sotter dog; C C Cooks owner, D E Rose 
handler. 3 Alpine Lad [Lad of Jingo-Fanny 

Flash], white and liver Pointer dog; Charles Proctor 
owner, Edward Garr handler. Equal 4th Peach 
Blossom [Count Gladstone IV-Peach Mark], white, 
black and tan English Setter bitch; W W Van Ars- 
dale owner, Charles Askins handler. Equal 4th 
Sport Webster [Marie's Sport-Peg's Girl], black, 
white and tan English Setter dog; FTowlerton owner, 
A B Caldwell handler. 

Championship Stake, November 21. Open to 
all Pointers and Setters which have been placed 
in any field trial. E R Hickerson and James Pease, 
judcres. Purse $300; $275 to first, $25 to runner-up. 
Forfeit $10 and $15 to start; 15 nominations, 10 
starters [6 English Setters, 4 Pointers]. 

Winners — Peach Blossom [Count Gladstone IV- 
Peach Mark], white, black and tan English Setter 
bitch; W W Van Arsdale owner, Charles Askins 
handler. Runner-up Annie B. [Qncle B -Pride 
of Abercorn], white, black and tan English Setter 
bitch; C K Brown owner, D E Rose handler. 

[Concluded next week.] 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



Coast Field Trials. 



Oo Monday, near Bakersfield, the twenty-first an- 
nual trials of the Pacific Coast Field Trial Club will 
commence. Birds are reported to be plentiful and 
cover favorable, a dry spell may have had some in- 
fluence on scent, but to offset this it is claimed that 
the heavy and continuous fogs prevailing in the trial 
ground districts will make the ground juBt about 
right. 

Judge W. S. Bell arrived in this city Thursday and 
was met and taken in charge by Secretary Albert 
Betz and Dr. C. W. Hlbbard. He will go to Bakers- 
field this evening and look over the grounds to-mor- 
row. A number of the club members and other 
sportsmen v. ill start for Bakersfield to-morrow. 

A notable feature of this meeting is that, besides 
the fat purses, there will be three cups for each event 
and also the champion cup. The latter has been won 
twice by W. S. Tevis. The cups offered in the other 
events were all donated by club members — to avoid 
.the chance of a member winning his own donation, 
there was no specified rating made for the prizes when 
donated. This practically leaves the distribution of 
the cups one of choice; the winner of first place get- 
ting the initial selection, second choice going to the 
second place winner and third dog to take the re- 
maining cup. 

The donors of the cups are: Members' stake — W. 
W. Richards, J. W. Flynn and Western Field. 
Derby— J. E Terry, J. H. Schumacher and W. S. 
Tevis. All- Age— Frank Maskev, Clinton E. Worden 
and W. W. Van Arsdale. 



The Union Metallic Cartridge Company will hence 
forth be represented on the road by Mr. "Hip" 
Justins, His route, unless we are greatly iristaken, 
will take in the southern portion of the State and 
Arizona. Mr. Justins is a well known and extremely 
popular sportsman. Previously he had a position of 
trust and responsibility under the suave abd esteemed 
Mr. E. T. Allen for ten years. When the latter 
gentleman retired from active business, Mr. Justins 
assumed an important billet with the now well known 
sporting goods house, the H. E. Skinner Co., which 
firm bought out Mr. Allen's business. 

Mr. Justins is well known to the trade and per- 
sonally acquainted with the majority of sportsmen on 
the Coast, having traveled extensively for the E. T- 
Allen Co., prior to the change. His genial personality 
and thorough acquaintance with the manifold details 
of the sporting goods trade is a guarantee fund of 
future success for which the Breeder and Sports- 
man takes the liberty of offering congratulations in 
advance. 

Both shooting and fishing conditions have recently 
taken on a decidedly pleasing aspect to sportsmen. 
Duck shooting has been good for a week past. Near 
Collinsville excellent bags were shot last Sunday by 
W. W. Richards, G. H. T. Jackson and John 
Lemmer, the birds were mostly mallards, canvasback 
were fairly represented however. On the Suisun, 
generally speaking, results were good. The same 
conditions prevailed on the Alameda and Alviso 
marshes. 

The "cans" however are very wise and fly extremely 
high. Last Sunday, on Petaluma creek, the largest 
flight of these ducks and one of the biggest bunches 
of "cans" that the writer has observfd in many years, 
came from the Petazuma marshes and lit out for the 
bay. They were up so high that it would have taken 
a rifle ball to stop one of them. auc «u* 9tW 

Posssbly the greatest canvasback shoot in the 
history of the Sonoma marsh, or any of the marshes, 



An effort will also be made toarrange fora Southern 
California trap shooting circuit after the pamphlet 
has been issued, so that the coming trap season in 
the south will be alivelj one. 




H. JUSTINS 
Traveling Representative U. M C. Co. 



for that matter, was had on the Alameda Gun Club 
preserve near McGills, three weeks ago. Nineteen 
members each secured the limit of 50 ducks at that 
time. Some good bags were also made on the preserve 
last Sunday. 

Good duck shooting can be had at Grafton on the 
overflowed lands. 

Geese shooting is now in order. Thousands upon 
thousands of gray and white geese, with a sprinkling 
of honkers and brants are now on the Colusa plains. 
Staten island is also "infested" by geese. We say 
infested because these birds do an incalculable amount 
of damage annually to the wheat sprouting in the 
fields. Mr. E. E. Drake of this city and F. W. Sheard 
of Tacoma, bagged over 300 gray and white geese 
near Willows in two days' shooting this week. 

A big run of steelhead in Russian river now on will 
draw a large contingent of local anglers to that grand 
stream tomorrow. 

A number of fine fish were taken at Point Reyes 
last Sunday. 

Striped bass fishing is still good in San Antonio 
creek. 

The Los Angeles County Fish and Game Proteetive 
Association has now 850 members on the roll, its list 
is steadily increasing and the organization is doing 
good work in the cause of game protection. 

Secretary L Herzog writes us that he will issue 
3000 pomphlets for 1904, one of which will be mailed 
to every member of the association and the balance 
used d uring the year to further the work of the as- 
sociation. 

The booklet will contain several new features (as 
compared to that issued in 1903), among which are 
the game laws of Southern California, gun clubs and 
their secretaries; a list of Southern California trap 
shooters' clubs and a list of the rifle teams of Southern 
California. 



A California Circuit is a Possibility. 

Mr. Arthur Letts informs us that there is a good 
prospect for an A. K. C. show in Los Angeles. There 
will be an effort made to have the southern metropolis 
included in the circuit of the other Coast cities. Mr. 
Letts is the owner of the good Collie Ravenswood and 
is an enthusiastic fancier. He invites suggestions 
from Coast fanciers as to the time of holding the 
show and for other data of mutual interest. 

There is no reason why a bench show can not be 
made successful and attractive for there are many 
lovers of the dog down south and a number of good 
dogs could be brought out at a Los Angeles show. 

An opon air show for one day in Lawrence, Santa 
Clara county, at the Oak Grove Kennels, is on the 
tapis for next month. In April a show is listed for 
San Jose and following will come a summer show in 
Santa Cruz. These three shows will probably be held 
under P. K. L. rules. 

The spring show of the San Francisco Kennel Club 
will take place in April or early in May. 

From the foregoing it will be seen that there is now 
a healthy ripening interest among the fancy fo. a 
series of bench shows in California this year. Theie 
is no reason why a strong combination could not be 
made of the material at hand. In the event of this 
being bronght about, the enthusiasm will be cum- 
ulative and the possibilities of the intioduction of 
"recruits" and "new blood" will be of inestimable 
value and advantage to Coast dogdom. 

It may not be far fetched to suggest the feasibility 
of a connecting link, say at Santa Barbara, for a neat 
little show was given at that delightful city on the 
ocean shore in July 1899; the second annual show of 
the Santa Barbara Kennel Clnb. 

What the affiliations are, or have been, will not 
cut any particular figure, the success of the project 
can be achieved by a unity of effort and cohesion of 
doggy interests. Whether under A. K. C. or P. K. 
L. auspices, is to quite an extent a secondary con- 
sideration, the main object being circuit organization. 

In the event of this, to be hoped for, amalgamation 
of the fanciers, it will undoubtedly redound also to 
the benefit of the northern show interests. 

One good season, and the project is a feasible one, 
will do for Coast dogdom what has been ardently 
desired for a long time past. 

If this scheme is to be made a go, there is no time 
to delay and the sooner there is an understanding all 
round and the preliminary work started all the more 
certain will there be a vast and rapid advance in the 
affairs of the Coast fancy. 



Mr. Leon Greenebaum is truly meeting with scire 
exceedingly hard luck in his Bulldog kennels. Some 
time ago he lost the good bitch Endcliffe Pleasure. 
She was in whelp, and breaking ont from her kennel 
one day got into a mixup with another dog, she 
died shortly afterwards. King Commando has only 
recently come into condition again, having been 
under treatment for several weeks. Early this week 
Mr. Greenebaum received the discouraging news that 
Endcliffe Forceps was dead. This well known stud 
dog and bench winner had been placed with a friend, 
at Mission San Jose, who in response to a message to 
send Forceps to this city telegraphed that the dog 
had gone to the canine majority. The genial pro- 
prietor of the Ellesgy Kennels has our sympathy for 
such a continuous run of mishaps. 



Mrs. K. Bradley-Dyne has purchased the Great 
Dane King Edward from James Cole of Kansas City. 
This dog was one of two placed on exhibition at the 
December show by Mr. Cole. In this accession to the 
Saturna kennels we believe Mrs. Bradley-Dyne has 
one of the best young stud dogs on the Coast. Wh j 
this dog was overlooked by local fanciers when he 
was here is a puzzle we couid never fathom. 



A Sportsman's Calendar. 

A noble elk in his death throes and lying prone on 
a rocky slope — in close proximity the dismounted, 
eager-faced hunter on the qui vive with rifle at 
"port" and ready finger on the trigger, a well trained, 
high strung and heavily caparisoned hunting pony 
waiting, held by the frail anchorsge of a trailiig 
bridle; the whole stirring incident framed in a back- 
ground of green pines and a picturesque vista of 
rangy mountain distances, such is an illustration of a 
hunting scene portrayed in living colors on tbe 
calendar of the Savage Ai ms Co. for 1904 This 
calendar is one that every sportsman should have. 
The painting is by the magic brush of Mr. Carl 
Rungis, the noted painter of wild animals and their 
habitats. Get one by sending 10 cents in postage 
stamps to T. P. Peckharr, Savage Arms Co., Utica, 
N. Y. It is worth having. 

Duck and Quail Outfits. 

The demand at Skinner's keeps up for sportsmen's outfits 
ammunition and guns. A large and new stock of goods b as been 
added to Qll the demand for hunting suits, rubber booti and 
hunters' footwear; canvas and folding wooden decoys, gun cases 
and a new design of leather-covered shell boxes. Peters Faotory 
Loaded Shells are unequaled. Skinner's place is 801 Market 
street. You oan get anything there you need for duck or quail 
shooting. Send for a catalogue, If you haven't the time to come, 
and try a mall order. a 



Strike! — if they don't give you Jackson's Napa 
Soda when you ask for it. 



January 9, 1904] 



(The $veebsv rmD gtpcu-tamtm 



11 



THE FARM. 




Use of Oil Meal. 



Quinto Stock Farm Cattle. 

The accompanying cuts of animals on 
the Quinto Stock Kami at Ingomar, 
Merced county, California, are represen- 
tative of the famous herd which added 
fresh laurels to its already loDg list by 
taking 41 premiums at the California 
State Fair of 1903. The picture of 
Chief of Valley View 4th is from a 
photograph taken in his yearling 
form. He won first premium and 
sweepstakes as a bid calf at the Cali- 
fornia State Fair of 1902, and first 
premium in bath open and State class 
for bulls between 18 and "24 months 
and junior champion sweepstakes at 
the California State Fair of 1903. 

Professor Carlyle in judging the cat- 
tle at the California State Fair of 190:? 
remarked about Chief of Valley View 
4th as follows : 

"He has that peculiar cylindrical 
form which is the most popular now 
for meat production. I don't care 
whether it is in beef cattle, hogs or 
sheep or what class of animal is being 
put on the market the round or cylin- 
drical form with no prominences in 
any part is the quality we most par- 
ticularly want." 

At latest advices Chief of Valley 
View 4th is constantly improving and 
showing his remarkable depth as well 
as cylindrical form and proving a 
wonderful breeder. There are also 
shown some of the prize winning 
heifers on the Quinto Stock Farm 
that will be bred to Chief of Valley View 
4th this year. The results are easily fore- 
told and the progeny from this ctobs will 
be heard from in the show ring at a later 
dav. 



The heavy use of oil meal with fat- 
tening cattle and especially with hogs 
tends to make the llesb rather soft and 
oily, something not desirable in beef pro- 
duction and especially objectionable in 
the production of pork, says W. A. Henry. 
The limited use of oil meal should not 
prove injurious to broodsows, but would 
be very helpful, especially in preventing 
costiveness, which may occur at or near 
the time of parturition. Such a condition 
should lie carefully avoided by the ues o' 



Geese. 

Old geese 'ay a greater number of larger 
eggs and are more reliable than young" 
birds and lay more fertile eggs. Breed- 
ing geese should have considerable exer- 
cise and l»e kept moderately thin in llesb 
through the winter by light feeding and a 
free range or facilities for swimming. 
The Toulouse geese lay well, but often do 
not sit. The Kmbden geese lay fewer 
eggs, but make better mothers, (ieese 
are graziers, and too much grain is not 
good for them. To insure fertile eggs they 




CHIEF OF VALLEY VIEW Ith 182590 



The Alfalfa Hog. 



It will not be a great while until the 
term ' alfalfa hog" means a different type 
from that grown East. When the rail- 
roads master the problem of carrying hoga 
through without disease quite a per cent 
of the pork of the country will be grown 
west of the corn belt, where alfalfa does 
better than in the Central States We 
look for the time when our pigs will be 
shipped East to cattle feeders and farmers 
who have more corn than hogs. These 
ehotes, when put on a heavy corn diet, 
whether on alfalfa or not, make rapid 
gains and, we believe, will make better 
use of corn than hogs grown on a corn ra- 
tion. Everybody in this country knows 
that hogs grown on alfalfa have much 
greater resitting power to cholera than 
those grown on corn and subjected to the 
same disease under the same conditions. 
— Field and Farm. 

o 

Good Sized Bones Are Necessary. 



Small bones in a large bog is a condi- 
tion that should not be desired. If the 
bones are very light it is a fact that the 
percentage of flesh covers the deficiency. 
But would it not be better to have still 
more flesh supported by still stronger and 
heavier bones? A big hog should have 
big bones and little hogs little bones. 
Our best breeders and judges insist on 
strong limbs and good sized bones as 
necessary to the vigor and symmetry of 
the hog.— Farm and Ranch. 

Missouri, according to Dr. F. B. Mum- 
ford, is now the second mule state in the 
Union [Texas being first], with 300,000 
animals, valued at $23,000 000, or 9 per 
cent of the total in the United States 
This in view of the thousands shipped to 
South Africa during the Boer war, is 
remarkable. 

Jackson's Napa Soda Is sold In every 
city, town a.v4 ' hamletln the State. 



oil meal and wheat bran, both of 
are valuable for correctives. 

The year 1903 has been a red-letter year 
for Hampshires in the Cnited States. 
They made the greatest show of the breed 
in this country at the International. Re- 
ports from every part of the country show 
! that the breeders are cleaned out of sur- 
, plus sheep of both sexes, and the largest 
Hampshire breeder in the country, Hon. 
Robert Taylor, reports orders for 3000 
more Hampshire rams than he could fill. 
A well known Indiana breeder of one of 
the smaller Down breeds has written to 
all our Hampshire advertisers for prices 
on ewes, and says they have none for sale 
A half dozen or more Hampshire impor- 
tations are on the cards, and Hampshire 
sentiment is growing at a pace that sug- 
gests a boom of big proportions. — Sheep 
Breeder. 

The efforts of ttie government to re-stock 
the exhausted stock ranges of the west 
with grasses should meet with universal 
approval. This work under federal direc- 
tion has been at least measurably success- 
ful in the mountain ranges of Washing- 
ton, and it is about to be undertaken on 
68 square miles of tvpical range in Ari- 
zona, which has recently been fenced in 
for this purpose. Thoughtful western 
men who have canvassed this question 
believe it can successfully be done all over 
the west. If the department of agricul- 
ture shall have exclusive charge of this 
work, there is little doubt of a successful 
issue to the undertaking. 



which should have an abundance of green food 
and constant access to drinking water 
I also if possible to a good pond. 



F. I. Wolcott of Colorado, represent- 
ing a syndicate of Denver and Cleve 
land, Ohio, capitalists, has just closed a 
deal for the purchase of 500,000 acres of 
land situated in the valley of the Da- 
nuco river, near the (lulf coast of Mex- 
ico. Mr. Wolcott says that the ranch 
will be stocked with standard-bred 
cattle from Kansas and Texas Lator 
on the syndicate will establish a pack- 
ing house in Mexico. 

o 

Thus far all efforts to prevent swine 
from rooting have been only compara- 
tively successful. All the appliances 
are only partially a success. Hogs are 
after the luscious morsels the earth only 



Brine for Keeping Pork Meats. 

For one hundred pounds of meat, take 
about eight pounds of salt, two pounds of 
sugar, one pint of New Orleans molasses 
and two ounces of saltpetre. Paiyeiiic 
the saltpetre, dissolve it in water, and 
with the sugar and molasses stir it into 
the brine. It require! three gallons of 
water with the eight pounds of salt to 
make the brine Btrong enough. Old 
barrels must be well scalded and scraped 
l>efore using ugain. 

o 

The highest priced cattle sold on the 
Chicago marketduring the past year were 
those fattened on the Agricultural College 
experimental farm at Columbia, Mo., and 
they brought a hundred centa on the 
hundredweight more than all other stock 
offered. This is another demonstration 
that scientific principles are not all tom- 
foolerv. 

o 

Cows give a more regular quantity in 
winter and the milk is more uniform in 
quality than in summer. Iwause the feed 
is of a regular quality and quantity in 
winter, but often very irregular in sum- 
mer, owing to the varying condition of 
ti e pasture. 

o 

There are two objective points towards 
which ambitious breeders roav strive— 
one is the show ground and the other is 
the market. There is profit in both. If 
successful in the exhibit there will be no 
trouble about getting a reasonably fancy- 
price. If stock is good there is always a 
good market at a fair price. 



Sometimes wounds collect pus and 
need to be lanced or opened with a 
knife. When such work is necessary 
the opening should be large enough to 
do some good. If it is too small it will 
close again and will need to be reopened. 
o 

Animals will tire of one ration, no dif- 
ference how fond they are of it, if it is 
fed to them all tho time. They will do 
better on a variety of foods. This is 
especially true of those which are con- 
fined and do not run on a pasture. 
o 

The bulk of beef cattle selling at $3 to 
$4 per cwt. and the bulk of roasts and 
steaks selling from twenty-five to thirty 
cents a pound, make stockmen and con- 
sumers think they are on earth only for 
the glory of the meat trust. 

o 

Swift & Co., which is incorporated for 
$25,000,000, increased its capital stock to 
$36,000,000 with the beginning of the new 
year. The company's net profits for the 



The Lincoln has the distinction of being 
the largest known breed of domestic sheep, 
hisdi weights of the breed exceeding 500 
pounds, and medium or average weights 
running from 275 to 300 pounds under 
avoring conditions of feed and care. The 
fleece of the well-bred and well-fed Lincoln 
ewe runs from 11 to 18 pounds, and the 
ram's fleece from 14 to 20 pounds, though 
these weights are often exceeded in 
Lincolnshire. The Dorset is a smaller 
sheep and has the advantage of the 
Lincoln in early maturity. 

Cleanliness and cold are nooessary for 
the production of sweet milk. 




affords, and thev will try to have them in year amount to something over $3,000,000 

and will enable it to declare a dividend of 
7 per cent and pass $1, 250.0 to the sur- 
pl us fund. 



spite of hog tamers rings and other de- 
vices. They are the worst in the spring 
and in the fall when the insects are com- 
ing out of or going into the ground. 

Superior dairy products can always be 
■old with a profit to the dairyman. 



Tho profitable cow is the one that 
grows better by being used as a dairy 
' animal. 



12 



[January 9, 1904 



The Science of Breeding. 

[P. J. Shields In LlveStook and Dairy Journal ] 
The ■o-callod "Science of Breeding" is 
one of the first importance to agriculture 
and livestock husbandry; if we knew 
more of the laws governing reproduction 
and the limitations and influences of 
heredity, we could breed with much 
greater certainty ; if we knew more, we 
might in breeding approach our ideals. 
But we are woefully ignorant on thu 
subject; it has not become a science un- 
less the one true and proven law that 
"like produces like, or the likeness of 
eome ancestor" makes it so. And this 
law would make a sufficient foundation 
for a true "science of breeding," if the 
influences could be controlled for its gen- 
eral application. Within each of the 
breeds of animals are broadly divergent 
types; controlling them ar« breeders with 
widely different standards. The difficulty 
is therefore constant to procure the "like" 
which the breeder so much desires. 
I have a mare with a trotting record 
2:10. I find a trotting stallion with 



of 



mare with 



a like record and mate my 
him in the hope of obtaining a foal which 
will do as well. It may happen that 
the sire was one of those happy results 
occasionally obtained from breeding in a 
strong current of thoroughbred blood and 
that the mare is bred upon a foundation 
of excellent California mustang blood. 
The result of the mating may and proba- 
bly will be a colt whose dominant charac- 
teristics are thoroughbred and mustang, 
with enough standard inheritances to 
constitute a nondescript mongrel. So it 
can easily be seen that breeding a 2:10 
horse to a 2:10 mare is not always breed 
ing like to like. 

But it may be said that the trotting 
breed has not yet been completely made 
is not yet absolutely pure, and that alien 
blood is still permitted in it. Admitting 
this to be true, I will take a breed which 
is admittedly pure and has been possibly 
for centuries, the Jersey, and the same 
thing is true. 1 have a medium sized, 
well tiuished Jersey cow which give9 a 
good quantity of rich milk and is of the 
exact cbaracter which I would like to 
breed. I send to some prominent Eastern 
breeder and secure a high priced and 
handsome bull which I breed to her. 
Will her resulting calf be like and as 
K'V>d as herself? I find that my model 
t:ow was produced by breeding a la ge 
i-oarse St. Lambert cow, which gave a 
v^ry large quantity of rather poor milk, 
but which because of it9 volume produced 
a large amount of butter, to a fine island 
type of bull fr )in a family of small but 
exceedingly rich milkers. My cow was 
the rare product of the combined excel 
lence of both parents without the faults 
of either. The bull I bred to her I find 
to havJ been bred by a man strongly 
inoculated with the color craze. He is 
"light cream fawn" and was bred from 
such an ancestry without regard to their 
possession of the essentials of a dairy 
breed. And so the calf upon which 1 had 
set my heart, from such a scattered 
heredity picked up the thin milk of one 
ancestor, the small quantity of another 
and the absence of udder and teats of 
third. And the solid cream fawn skin 
with which she was covered only made 
more conspicuous her utter worthlessnesi 
And so breeding one Jersey to another is 
not always breeding like to like. 

These illustrations could be carried 
through all the breeds. My purpose in 
calling attention to theee divergent influ- 
ences and types within the various breeds 
is/to emphasize the necessity of a uniform 
harmony of breeding, of having a fixed 
standard,*, single type and of so directing 
circumstances as to require and practically 
coerce all breeders into adopting and 
breeding towards it. 

A man who calls himself a Hereford 
breeder or a Holstein breeder should not 
be recognized as such when he produces 
animals which have not bred type, and 
which do not conform to some well estab- 
ished standard for his particular breed. 



association affects color will it not also 
modify form'.' Will the manner in which 
a prospective mother is treated, the food 
she eats, the purpose to which she is put, 
the work she is made to preform, in- 
fluence the future form and function of 
her produce? And when the young thing 
is born can it be rescued from mediocrity 
or condemed to it, by the environment to 
which it is subjected? We have so much 
tradition and "fireside science" on these 
questions that we should like to have 
them given such settlement as the facilities 
of our experiment system permits of. 

Another question about which knowl- 
edge should be possible, and about which 
the colleges are without any agreement, 
is, which of the various breeds are the 
better for the purposes for which they 
are bred? Which is the beet hreed of 
poultry for laying purposes ; which breed 
of cattle produce meat most economically; 
which breed of swine does likewise? 
Which is the better breed of cattle for 
the production of butter, Guernseys, 
Jerseys or Holsteins? We have no 
harmony of answer to this question, and 
we believe that we should have. There 
cannot be two best breeds, and consider- 
ing the difference in the various typesi 
the sources from which they came, the 
peoples which made the breeds, and the 
environments which produced them, it 
seems most improbable that there should 
be two ^.f exactly equal value for special 
dairy use. And we ask the colleges to 
tell us which is the best dairy breed, and 
why? And we expect an answer, and of 
course but one anBwer. When the answer 
comes it will affect property values, it will 
hurt patrons of the schools, as it will 
offend legislators upon which they are 
dependent for support. But science aims 
only at truth, and tells it feerlessly. It 
has unhappily been charged that privately 
endowed institutions have been influenced 
in their instruction by the interests of 
their patrons. Let it never be said of 
those publicly supported, that they were 
moved by any other consideration than 
those of truth and its fullest expression. 
Sacramento, Cal. 



Responsibility for the divergent types 
within the several breeds lies ehiefiy per- 
haps with the several associations controll- 
ng them, but the agricultural colleges 
cannot escape their share of responsibility 
for it. The college herds are mostly as 
various as the personality of their several 
staffs. One herd will be made up of large, 
rather coarse Holsteins and Jerseys, an- 
other with fine and neat animals of these 
breeds, while a third will choose fine of 
one and coarse of another, and of course 
the instruction in each college follows the 
forms of its cattle. The professors from 
these colleges act as judges at most of our 
live stock shows. At one, a leading pro- 
fessor with a national reputation, in judg- 
ing a certain breed where all of its ex- 
tremes are represented, awards the prizes 
in a certain order. The same cattle are 
shown the following week in a neighboring 
State where another famous instructor in 
animal industry officiates as judge, and he 
exactly reverses the previous awards. 
This is scandalous and serves not to en- 
ighten breeders, but to confuse them. 
Fancy what mathematics would be if in 
one institution it was taught that two 
and two made four and in another that it 
made five I Would it be a science or a 
system?' No nor is breeding as too fre- 
quently practiced, and as I am sorry to 
say too frequently taught. 

There is often more difference between 
two types of animals within a given breed, 
both recognized as correct, than there is 
between average animals of different 
breeds And the results following the 
mating of such types is as uncertain as 
from crossing the different breeds. Let 
our college professors unite upon one type 
for each of the breeds and educate the 
people to it. Let the live stock papers co- 
operate with them, and soon the so-called 
breeders oi animals which do not conform 
to it will win no prizes at exhibitions, 
will not be recognized as breeders and 
will find no sale for their product. I am 
afraid that our agricultural professors lack 
courage. Can it be that they fear to offend 
powerful breeders or influential interests? 
Thev should listen to the splendid plea 
for truth and its pursuits without fear or 
without favor made by our distinguished 
President Wheeler in a recent address in 
Arizona. Our government gives liberal 
support to our experiment stations; our 
States generously endow our agricultural 
colleges. We look to them for truth, and 
truth is the same in every college herd 
and in every show ring, and if the stand 
ards set there are different they cannot 
both be true. 

In other things too, we look to them for 
original research, for constant contribu 
tions to that enlarging knowledge which 
constitutes the new and true "science of 
agriculture." And I feel that they should 
have contributed more to our knowledge 
of heredity and the laws governing repro. 
duction than they have. They have not 
done with animal life what Luther Bur- 
bank has done with vegetable. Their 
opportunity has been great as there are 
Experiment Stations in every state in the 
Union, where experiments could have 
been conducted by the scientific men in 
charge. These stations represent every 
variety of food, climate, location and 
physical environment. The whole system 
represents an ideal agency for research, 
and through it, much of the darkness and 
many of the doubts which now confront 
the breeder should have been dissolved. 
But we are still without knowledge as to 
the relative influence of the sire and the 
dam upon their offspring. We do not 
know of the effect produced upon the new 
life by an enfeebled or diseased condition 
of one or both of the parents, nor as to 
whether that effect would result from 
such condition before conception or after- 
wards. We are still in doubt with re- 
spect to that vast and important field of 
possible knowledge comprehended within 
the term "prenatal influences." Will a 
solid red Shorthorn cow bred from solid 
ancestry be inclined to produce a broken 

colored calf through association with satisfaction with scant stock otherwise 



Just as strongly should the temptation 
to have two or three breeds or varieties 
be put aside. 

This article has no room to go into de- 
tails why mongrel poultry is undesirable 
poultry or why it is wisdom and common 
sense to breed only one variety at a time. 

How to start, with eggs for hatching or 
with grown stock. 

Perhaps your ability to raise chicks is 
an unknown quality 

Anyhow raising chicks is one of the 
more difficult things for the beginner or 
amateur. 

This seems to be especially true of rais- 
ng chicks when there are those of only 
one or two fine sittings of boughten eggs. 

There then remains, the buying of 
stock. All things taken into considera- 
tion, buying breeding stock in the fall 
months, is the more satisfactory. 

If your experience is limited or your 
purse contracted avoid the error made by 
nine-tenths of all beginners with fancy or 
thoroughbred poultry. 

Buying too many birds or putting 
quantity ahead of quality. 



The Question of Breeds. 

[By W. Theo. Wittman.] 
The question of what breed or variety is 
an ever live one, with those new to poultry 
lore. 

I have the question put at me a score of 
ways by many individuals. 

Hence I have pretty thoroughly can 
vassed this question and am now sticking 
to a stereotyped reply. ' 'Breed the variety 
you like best." 

There is profit and pleasure in every 
single one of the many varieties listed in 
the American Standard 

Its in the Cochins, in the Plymouth 
Rocks, in the Leghorns, in the Polish and 
right through the whole list. 

People succeed best in an avocation in 
which they take genuine pleasure and 
interest and likewise they will suceed best 
with a variety of poultry they especially 
fancy. 

On the other hand there are people 
who wish to engage in poultry keeping 
who have no especial fancy for any one 
variety or breed. 

To these I would say, sensibly choose 
one of the half dozen most popular varie- 
ties. 

Their popularity is built on genuine 
merit and stands for something. 

On the other hand a novice had better 
let the newer varieties alone, no matter 
if they do happen to be the popular favor 
ite6 of the hour. 

Compromising indecision by putting off 
the day of starting with pure-bred or 
thoroughbred poultry and substituting 
dunghill or common barn yard stock is 
sheer folly. 

If you cannot decide what variety of 
( pure-bred poultry you like best, or that 
you cannot afford same, then rather than 
start with mongrels don't start at all. 

There is no pleasure, no money, no 



Swine Breeding. 



W. A. Vandiver gives the following ac- 
count in the Swine Breeders' Journal of 
his experiment with the Yorkshire cross: 

I have been crossing Poland-China sows 
with pure Large Yorkshire boarB for four 
years, and I get more pigs and better ones 
than I ever got before. They are stronger 
and more thrifty growers and fatten on 
less food than any hog 1 ever saw. Now 
take the increased number and the saving 
in feed, and we have much larger profits 
from a given number of sows. This is not 
all. They are hardier and not so liable to 
disease as the native breeds. A few years 
ago I had seventy head of the native hogs 
and forty-six Yorkshire and Poland China 
crosses, and cholera set in among them, 
and I lost the entire herd of natives and 
only four of the cross breeds. I fed the 
forty-two crosses awhile and then sold 
them at 5 cents above the market. They 
brought $460. If the other seventy had 
been crosses and I had saved the same 
per cent I would have had $704 more. 
Now, these are facts, and I have good 
reason to like and recommend the Large 
Yorkshire to my neighbors. I had twenty- 
six crosses that averaged 175 pounds at a 
little less than five months old. Last 
spring twelve sows had 100 pigs and 
saved ninety of them, and they were the 
thriftiest lot I ever saw. 



Don't Overfeed Brood Sows. 



The brood sow is grown to raise her 
kind in future years and not to compete 
with other hogs at a fat stock show, 
9ays Stockman and Farmer. The two 
kinds of hogs are grown for different 
ends and are treated differently, and, 
whatever may happen the latter in Hs 
unnatural existence, the breeder of the 
brood sow should have care that his 
sows are neither forced into living lard 
barrels nor a mushroom-like develop- 
ment of bone and muscle. The labora- 
tory inside the sow must do duty for 
years, and it is of the greatest impor- 
tance that it be not crippled for useful- 
ness in early life. 



Holstein cows during pregnancy ? If such mongrel poultry. 



Although corn is a practically uni- 
versal crop, it is maintained that the 
yield can be materially increased 
through improvement of varieties and 
practically in determining the kind 
best adapted to each section. The De- 
partment of Agriculture is studying 
the development and acclimatization 
of at least one superior strain of corn for 
each of the various geographical sections 
of the United States. It is stated that in 
several sections where this work has been 
in progress two or more years, growers 
have before them an object lesson proving 
that well bred and selected seed will pro- 
duce as much as sixteen bushels per acre 
more than the seed usually planted. 



Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



January !», 1904] 



18 



Sheep Notes. 

The flesh carrying power of the modern 
Merino ii amply demonstrated in the 
s>how ring these days. It takes a fat 
sheep, a finished one, to get the rihhons. 

Some of the sheep breeders are dis- 
appointed at the world's fair preliminary 
prize list. It makes small appropriations 
to Dorsets, Lincolne, Suflblks and Tunis 
breeds. 

Keeping a ewe a year for her wool and 
her lamb is a profitable business now, 
when both of her products are a fnir price, 
but loss of the lamb often knocks out all 
the profit. 

Sheep men generally have a good word 
for rape and alfalfa. Some losses, how- 
ever, are reported from pesturing them. 
They ehould be used carefully, never 
turning on when wet or when the sheep 
are empty 

Spots on Chester White Pigs 

Pedigreed Chester Whites when bred 
together alwajs produce pigs without 
black spots, saj s W. P. Xau lain in 
/;,-,../.,> Hiiz-tti. Ho spoak* of the 
original Chester Whites as bred in 
southern Pennsylvania and northern 
Delaware, where the breed originated. 
These pigs have been bred without 
foreign blood for the past eighty years. 
They have taken such a hold on the 
people in that section that at thelea>t 
ooe-half ot the pigs are Chester Whites. 
At a small county fair held in northern 
Daliware the pens were fillfd entirely 
with Chester Whites, not another bretd 
br«ing represented. 



RACING 




OAKLAND TRACK 

New California Jockey Clot 

RACING 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Thursday, Friday and Saturday. 

RAIN OR SHINE. 

SIX OR MORE RACES DAILY 

RACKS START AT 2:13 I'. M. SUA BP 

For special train* stopping at tbe track take 
S. P Ferry, foot of Market street, at 12, 12:30, I, 
or 2 o'clock 

No smoklog !□ last two care, which are reserved 
for ladles and tbelr escorts. 

Returning, train* leave track at 4:10 and 1:45 
•ad Immediately after tbe last race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, Prealden*. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Serretary. 

Fast Pacer For Sale. 

npHE PACING OELDINO, AL SANDY Z:10( 
t by Way land W., dam Rapid Ann by Overland. 
Can pace three beat* better tban 2:17. Can brush 
very fast on tbe road. Excellent proipect to raoe 
He Is one of tbe best road horse* In tbe city 
Gentle and intelligent. Safe for lady to drive 
For price and further particulars address S. 
WATSON, 235 Douglas street, San Francisco. 



KICKING, 



PROF J. A. 



Balking, Shying or any 
kind of a hubit cured 
In a tow hours by my 
system. Particulars free 

IIKKRY, Pleasant Hill. Ohio. 



FOR SALE. 

Three Standard-Bred Trotting Stallions 

WILKES STOCK. 

One Seal Brown, IS bands, foaled May 2, 1 80S, 
first dam Fearless by Fallls 4781 (record 2:23); 
second dam Jean Perault by Signal 33/7. 

One Golden Bay, 16.1 bands, foaled March 5, 1898: 
first dam Signal by Del Sur 1098 (rooord 2:24), 
dam of Guy Line 2:29)4; second dam Lady SIgi 
nal by Signal 3327. 

One Krown, wbltepolnta, 16.1 bands.foaled April, 
1899; full brother to tbe bay. 
These oolts are all sired by Prince Alrlee 28045, 

son of Gay Wilkes 2807 (record 2: ISM), and bred by 

Wm. Corbltt, Ban Mateo, Cal. They are pure 

galted and show wonderful speed for the little 

work they have done. 
For further particulars apply to 

T. H. MoEVOY, Menlo Park, Cs>l. 



THE $60,000 



DAN PATCHi:56i 

CHAMPION PACING HORSE of the WORLD 



IWllBoal Il..|>|.|ra, «tn<i Hr 



EATS 



3 FEEDS 



I Ok 



ONE CENT 



EVERY DAY. 

"International Slock Food" greatly aids Digestion and Assimilation so that More Nutrition is obtained 
from all grain eaten. It "tones up" and Permanently Strengthens the entire system ami I*urifics the 
Blood so that disease is prevented. Every $3.50 pail of "International Slock Food" is positively guaran- 
teed to save $7.00 worth of grain. It will cause your Race Horse to have more speed and endurance. It 
will make your Carriage Horses healthy, fat and beautiful. It will give your Show Horses more life and 
action and make them glossy. It will make your Work Horses strong, healthy and of great endurance. 
It will make your Stallions and Brood Marcs surer, and your colts will be better and grow and develop 
more rapidly. "International Slock Food" is absolutely harmless even if taken into the human sWem. It is 
prepared from Roots, Herbs, Seeds and Barks and is fed in small amounts as an addition to the regular grain 
allowance. It is equally profitable when fed to Horses, Cattle, Sheep, Hogs, Colts, Calves, Lambs or I'igs. It 
will make you a large extra profit when fed to your stock for Growing, Fattening or Working. It will increase 
milk 15 to 25 per cent, in Cows, Mares, Sows or liwes, and only costs •»".? I'KKDS for ONE CENT."** A 
Dan Patch colt commanded $5,000 at eight months of age. He looked like a yearling and was beautiful, strong 
and vigorous. The dam was fed "International Slock Food" before and after foaling, and the colt as soon as it 
would eat. Dan Patch became the World's Champion Harness Horse nine months after commencing to eat 
"International Stock Food" every day. If it is good for such horses don't you think it would pay you to test 
it on yours? Our "International Stock Food Farm" contains 650 acres, 12 miles from Minneapolis, and 
on it we own Dan Patch I'.stw Directum 2:05!^, Rov Wilkes Z :06'A, and a band of brood mares. They all 
eat "International Stock Food" every day, BEWARE OF IMITATIONS and SUBSTITUTES. There arc many 
worthless imitations on the market, put out by people who seem to think that the way to start a busi- 
ness is to steal as much as they can from some prominent firm. No chemist cin separate and name all olthr in<redi. 
enU used in "International Slock Food," etc.. and any chemist or manufacturer claiming to do so must he an Ignoramus or a Falsifier. 

A BEAUTIFUL DAN PATCH PICTURE FREE 

We have a very fine, large lithograph of Dan Patch with the great driver, M. E. McHsnry, in sulky. 
This Lithograph, Printed in Six Brilliant Colors, is one of the finest and most attractive horse 
pictures ever published. It is 21x28 and printed on heavy paper suitable for framing. 
(*i?*We Will Mail You One Copy Free, postage prepaid. If You will Answer Two Questions. 
1st.— Name This Paper. 2d. — State How Much Stock You Ovvn. 
Answer these questions in a letter or on a postal card and we will mail at once. 

Xd dress- 



Write at once before the offer is withdrawn. 

mosss*/ International Stock Food Co. 

MINNEAPOLIS. MINN..U. S. A. 



Until Sl.M-k I'o 

Capital 1-sld I 



^Dr. Smiths 



For muscular lfime= 
f ncss Or corded biick 
no other liniment 
lis it's equal. 

No racing stablej 
^should be without 
It. Good stuff . 

You Bet 

All Druggists and Harness 
Dealers or Vita Oil Co.. 

1533 Buchanan St. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

J. A, McKerron and J. O'Kane. Agts 



FOR SALE. 

pLACK TROTTING MARK. RECORD 2:IHi<; 

standard bred; sound; nearly Ift bands high: 
weighs about IHU pounds. Oentle and a hlfth. 
olass road mare Can be bought cbeap. To scu 
tbe msre snd for particulars rail or address 
Telephone: Pine IT" - . .1 W ZIHIIELL. 

34.1 Twentieth Arc, San Francisco. 



WANTED 
RHODE ISLAND REDS 

If any breeder In this State baa thorough hrod 
chickens of the sbovo variety they will please 
communicate with the undersigned. 

LEWIS A. SAGE. 

SARATOtl t , CAI,. 



J, W. Zibbeh's Training Stables 

Corner Point I.oboa Koad and 20th Avenue 
San Francisco. 

HORSES TRAINED FOR TRACK OR KOAD 
and satisfaction guaranteed Terms reason- 
able. Horses bought and sold. 'Phone Pine 1788 



FOR SALE 



By Imp Cavalier, dam Lena 
Oliver, by King Lear: second 

dam Lilly Bobblt by Victory SAM FULLEN la a high-class stallion. Winner of four stakes. In 
drst-class condition. For price and further particulars address 



SAM FULLEN (Thoroughbred). 



A. FORBES, 



Or BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 



5615 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 
THOROUGHBRED YEARLING COLTS 

Uv.DICAT, out of Strougbred Mares 

ALSO 

TROTTING BRED 

YOUNG STALLIONS AND FILLIES 

TKOTTKK8 AND PACERS. 

THE SIRES OF THESE COLTS ARE DIABLO. 

Nutwood Wilkes, Monbells, Cupid and Sidney 
Dillon. Tbe sires of their first, seoond and third 
dams are Ouy Wilkes, Hock Wilkes, Director, 
Harold, Electioneer, Cornelius. Paul's Abdallah, 
Venture, Lodl and St. Clair. All of these sires 
trace in the male line to Ham'ilet nian lOtb.ougb 
hls'best producing male descendants, excepting 
tbe thoroughbreds Venture and Lodl and the 
pacer St. Clair. 

C. E. FARNUM, M. D. 
305 Parrott Building. 



FOR SALE. 

A I Y ENTIRE STOCK OF STANDARD-BRED 
-'■ Trotting and Pacing Horses. Single drivers 
and double teams. Some excellent prospects for 
• take winners entered In the ( iccklent. Stanford 
and Breeders Futurity stakes Tbe great brood 
mare Daisy S. (dam of Tom Smith 2:I.V<. Qenoral 
Vallejo 2:30%. Sweet Rose 2:2S (trial 2:21) and 
Little Mac (3) 2:27). The driving horses and eolta 
can bo seen at my stable In Vallejo. and the 
broodmares, etc.. at tbe race track. Apply to or 
address THOMAS SMITH, Vallejo. Cal. 

SITUATION WANTED-By a thoroughly oom- 
' petent and reliable trainer and developer of 
speed, who Is thorough master of his profession; 
best of Coast and Eastern references. Addreaa 
TRAINER, 1531 E atreet, Sacramento, Cal. 



Dillon Stock For Sale 

fiAKV fill I ON brown filly, foaled May 
U/MOI ,n „, Santa Roxa 

Stook Farm, aired by Sidney Dillon, sire of Lou 
Dillon, UMJ4, First dam Paceta 2:24 by Lone 
Pine 2:28*4 (Son of Electioneer): seoond dam Ceta 
by Piedmont 2:1?^; third dam Cecil by Oen. Ben- 
ton 2:34w. fourth dam Cuba by Imp Australian, 
etc. DAISY Dl I.I.I IN Is a beautiful filly and a 
(rand prospect for some one Fine disposition, 
well developed and shows she Is bred to win. 

I will sell her dam PACETA also. She is the 
Acme of Palo Breeding Both dam and Oily muat 
be seen to bo appreciated. I am offering them for 
sale as I will not have tbe time to devote to them 
that they should have. Paceta was stinted to 
Sidney Dillon again Mbt 2fith. Address. T. II S 
care of ItHKKtiKii a sj n Si'o itTSM A J», 3o (Jeary St., 
San Franclico, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA 




BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



Photo Engraving Company zpz'ti 



lilt. II CLASS ART 

tm 

Halt Tons* and Lint Engraving 

Artlatle Designing. 
Ml MualoB St.. ear. first, laa rraaetav* 



HO I.ST HI NS Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1890 1st A Sri for aged rows, 
4-7T.,I-yr. and 2 yr olds. 21 Jersey a and ImrtaSDis 
oompetlng ath year my Bolstefna have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stork for sale, also pigs. F. 
H Burke. *l Montgomery Hi H V 

JERSEYS, HOI. STEINS AND DURHAM*. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1ST*. William Nllea A Co. Los Angeles, 
Oal. 

AYRSHIRE* Young Mulls, Onwa and Heifers. 

From pvlae winning families. Brown 
A Brandon Petalnma Cal. 

PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Beady for framing. 
Write for prleea. 
Bn somas, aitd B po BTinis , M Qeary Stress, 
•en msalaao, Oal. 



14 



[January 9, 1904 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

iigh Stepping 
Hackney-Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEALT, Manager. 




Oictatus Medium 32499 



Will make the coming season at 

Race Track, Hollister, Cal. 

Jos Sanchez In charge 

$40 FOR THE SEASON. 

Payable at time of service, with usual return privilege. 
Every care taken to prevent accidents, but no responsibil- 
ity should any occur Prompt and careful attention in all 
cases Pasturage furnished to mares sent from a distance 
at js 50 a month. 

A DICTATUS MEDll'M I I USE OF SIOO. 
I will give a purse of $100, with entrance money added 
for a race, best two in three, open to any and all colts from 
DICTATUS MEDll'M the result of the breeding season of 1904, either pacers or trotters Must be 
three to start an Trace to come o(T on Hollister track. Fair week 1 907 (Exact date to be hereafter 
announced ) K entrance money, payable June 1. 1006. * thirtj ; days before the race Three 
moneys: 60 per cent to first horse: 30 per cent to second and 10 per cent to J"™- £ 0T *SHg* ^ 

tlcnlam address K< 1 ■ LATHKOI , Hollister. 

ticulars, address DESCRIPTION. 

DICTATUS MEDIUM is 6 years old, weighs 1220 pounds. A beautiful turned bay horse with 
heavy mane and tall, kind and gentle, with a perfect disposition. Good tot tovjbone. Be itai 
great power and speed. Has a record of 2:«4. but has worked out in 2:12. He is a horse that will go 



great power and speed. Has a record of 2:24, but has worked out in a iz. n» is a ■«■.«■■ «■■ go 
out any day and do his best. His colts are models of grace and beauty. Only one so far has been 
worked. This one. Al Willson's yearling LITTLE MEDIUM, paced an exhibition H m>'e on the 
Hollister Race Track in 38"-/ seconds, a 2:33 gait. This colt hasgreat promise. 

DICTATUS MEDll'M is by Dictatus 2:17. one of the best bred and fastest horses ever brought to 
California. The dam of Dictatus Medium is Belle Medium (dam of Stam B. &UM>. "J Happy 
Medium grandslreof the dam of Lou Dillon 1:58'/*- His second dam is Argenta by Almont Light- 
ning, si reof the dam of Zoml.ro 2:11. There Is no doubt but Dictatus Medium will prove to be a sire 

<-.f L-naorl aa ir.»ll ae tMnf\ tfl^P Sit vie Mllii (1 jSDOsl 1 10D . 



mug. sire ui me uaui «i ouuiuiu i ». * »° « 
of speed as well as good size, style and disposition. 

BAYSWATER WILKES 2:25i 

Sire of KELLY HRIGGS 2:10k 



Son 
of 



WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1904 AT 



Sable Wilkes 2:18 

and 

Fanny Bayswater 

Dam of S in 2:30 

Fee $40. 

BAYSWATER WILKES is a sire of speed, size, good looks, soundness and gameness. Every 
one of his produce that has been trained can show standard speed. His sire, Sable Wilkes, also sired 
Nushagak.sireof Arlsto, wlnnerof the Occident and Stanford stakes. His dam. Fanny Ba'swatcr. 
is the dam of Senator L., holder of the champion four-mile trotting record of 10:12. 

Breed to BAYSWATER WILKES and you will get colts that will sell at good prices. 

For cards containing full Pedigree and all particulars address 

S. H. HOY, Winters, Cal. 



WOODLAND, CAL. 



^SAVE^E-HOR^EiSp^ IN Cu REa 




HEG.WH TRADE 





5.00 WITH WRITTEN GUARANTEE. 



On Broken Down, Weak, Sprained and Ruptured Ligaments and 
Tendons Its Power is Unfailing. 

No Man need see his Horse suffer and become Incapacitated. 

^"QAVETUC UnBQC" positively and permanently cures bone and bog 

mm oMYL-I nL-nUnOU SPAVIN, THOROUGHPIN, RINGBONE (except low ringbone), 

CURB, SPLINT, CAPPED HOCK. WINDPUFF, SHOE BOIL, WEAK AND SPRAINED TEN- 
DONS, AND ALL LAMENESS. 

'•SAVE-THE-HORSE" cures without scar, blemish or loss of hair; can be applied anywhere and 
In all conditions and extremes of weather. Horses may be worked as usual with shin or ankle boots, 
as no harm can result from destruction of hair or scalding of limb. 

Cured horses are absolute oertatnties as to the possibility of the remedy for your own case Such 
results, as shown In our booklet, by business men whose reliability can be readily ascertained, have 
carried "SAVE-THE-HORSE" over skeptiolsm, prejudice and uncertainty. Send for the booklet 
and copy of written guarantee, which Is as binding to protect you as the best legal talent conld 
make it. 

S5.00 r»JE!H BOTTLE. 

Written guarantee with every bottle. Need of second bottle Improbable, except In rarest 
cases. If your case is different we advise frankly as to possibility of the remedy effecting a cure 
Give veternarlan's diagnosis, if he Is competent. Describe age, development, location of swellings' 
lameness and way hor:ie carries and holds leg. 

$5.00 a bottle at all druggists and dealers, or sent express prepaid. 

TROY CHEMICAL CO., Manufacturers, TROY, N. Y. 

D. E NEWELL, 519 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal., Pacific Coast Agent 




QUINNS OINTMENT 

FOR HORSES 

stands at the head of all veterinary remedies. Such troubles 

as Spavins, Curbs, Windpuffs, Splints, Bunches have no 
terrors for a horse if the master keeps and applies Quinn's Ointment. All 
well known horsemen speak of it in the highest terms : 

Mill. r . I Sibley <.f Franklin, Pv, owners of St. Bel, brother of late Be, Boy, write, "We have 
Ijiimn sOintm.iit . ,• i. »r.ut Bui-ceon and believe it fulfills all claimed for it. We enter- 
r recommend it to our friends." * or Curbs, Splints, Spavins or Bunches it has no equal. 

$i.oo per pa 3old by all druggists, or sent by mail. CXTIVn 

W. B. BODY a CO.. WHITEHALL, N. Y. IllMJ 



SIDNEY DILLON 23157 

a . „_,(LOTJ DILLON l:58tf (the Fastest Trotter and Greatest Record Breaker In the world), 
° ,re 01 ( Dolly Dillon 2:C8^ (the fastest mare of 1901), B. S Dillon 2:loJ< and Captivity 2:28^. 

SANTA ROSA STOCK FARM 



SANTA ROSA, CAL. 

SIDNEY DILLON was sired by Sidney 
'-' l..'i dam Venus (dam of Adonis 2:1114, 
Leah 2:24^, Cupid 2:18 and Juno, tfie dam or 
Mercury 2:21 and Ida 2:30) by Venture 2:2"H. 
sire of dam of Directum 2:05^ SIDNEY 
DILLON Is a model of symmetry and im- 
parts his grand Individuality, inherent speed 
and excellent disposition to all his progeny. 

Terms for the Season, $100. 

Ooly a limited number of approved mares 
taken. Utiual return privilege In case horce 
is sold service fee will be returned!! mares 
have not proven in foal. Season ends July 
1, I9IM. Pasturage $4 per month. Best of 
care taken of mares, but no responsibility 
assumed for accidents or escapes For par- 
ticulars regarding shipment of marcs, etc, 
address FRANK TURNER, 

Supt. Santa Rosa Stocn Farm, 
Santa Rosa, Cal 
Or IRA PIERCE, 728 Montgomery St., S. F. 




THE FARMER'S SUPPLY OF 
THE MIDDLE WEST 

Cedar Replds (Iowa) Jack Farm. 



Percheron and Belgian Stallions. 

Three importations this season of prize-winning Percherons, Belgians and German Coachers and 
Catalan Spanish and Majorca Jacks. I have the largest Draft and Coach Horses in America, and 
will sell more quality for the money than yeu can And anywhere Come and see for yourself. 

W. L. De CLOW. 



NEW MODEL 




THE BEST IN THE WORLD, 

O'BRIEN & SONS 

Cor. Golden Gate Ave. and Polk St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



COMPRESSED PURE-SALT 

~ BRICKS ~ 

FOR ALL- STOCK 
HEAITHFW^CONVEMIEHT-ECONOMICAL 




Have the approval of large 
stock owners everywhere. 
Ask your dealer, or send 
for free booklet to 

BELMONT STABLE SUPPLY CO. 



ROSE DALE STOCK FARM 

SANTA ROSA, CAL 
Home of Daly 8:15, Washington Mc- 
Klnneyand St. Whips 8:31, 

has for SALE some broodmares, yearlings, by 
Washington McKlnney. Good prospects for 1904 
and roadsters. 




NO 



H OGPTTl £ P °t)lTRY ,, fTT| N6 




19 FR^EMONTiST.SAN FRANCJSC 





BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
nerclal school on the Pacific Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; SO teaohers: 70 typewriters; over 800 students 
annually placed In positions. Send for catalogue. 

B. P. HEALD, President. 

SITUATION WANTED 

4 8 TRAINER AND RACE DRIVER, BY A 
• * thoroughly competent man, from the East, 
with experience. First-class references as to 
ability and character. Address T. C HARRIS, 
care of West Ranch. Fernando. Cal. 

ANTED— SITUATION AS MANAGER OF 
small Stock Farm. Thoroughly competent 
and trustworthy young man. Best of references 
Address J R M., care Breeder and Sportsman, 
36 Geary Street, San Francisco. 



w 



For the 
ATHLETE, 

Absorbing Jr, 

is invaluable in 
removing soreness and 
restoring that pliable, 
elastic condition of the muscles so much 
desired, also cures strains of the joints 
and ligaments in a few hours. $i.o* per 
bottle of regular dealers or by mail. Write 
for pamphlet, 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

SPRINGFIELD, - - MASS. 

For sale by Mack&Co., Langley'& Michaels Co., 
Redington & Co , J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Franclsoo. 

TALES OF THE TURF 

718 Pages of Horse. 

Two Volumes of 

FACTS - FICTION - FUN 

Vol. I. — FA8IGS Contains -7 stories written 
by William B. Fask;, and a Memoir. 214 
pages. Cloth. 

Vol. a — WET 8UNDAV8, provides samples of 
racing from the Grand Circuit to the bushes, 
a peep at the gallopers and quarter horses, and 
the horse trader. Illustrated by Whitney 404 
pages. Cloth. 
Price of each volume, S2 OO, or the two in one 

order, »3.50,all charges prepaid. Address 

Breeder and Sportsman, 

36 Geary St , SAN FRANCISCO, Cal. 



VETERINARY. 

DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Turin. 

Infirmary and Residence— 81 1 Howard St.: 
between Fourth and Fifth Sts., San Francisco. 
Telephone: Main 457. 

Ira Barker Balziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Roa<< Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: (05 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Franclsoo, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



IDx*. W xxx, IT". Xlgan. 

M. R. C. V. 8., F. E. T. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnbur. 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President ot 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco 
Telephone West 121 



January 9, 1«04] 



Che gvccDcr mtfr $p&v t # uiuti 



15 



BALLISTITF 
The Standard Dense Powder of the World. 

1901— Wins Second In Grand American Handicap at Targets. 

1903— Wins First In Grand American Handicap at Targets 

IMS— Wins during Grand American Handicap week at Kansas City. 
First Amateur Average in Regular Events. Tblrd General Average in Regular Event 

ALL Or ABOVE ARE AMATEUR RECORDS. 

Take No One's Word. Try It for Yourtelf. 

J H LAU &, CO. 75 CHAMBERS ST " NEW Y0RIC CITY 



Du Pont Gun Powder 

SMOKELESS, SHOT GUN and 

MILITARY POVDEB 

Black Powder for Sporting and Blasting Purposae 
! he Reputation of a Hnndrad Y«*n ia tba Guarantee of 

DU PONT POWDER 

M9 Mission St.. Room 311, s»n Fraanla** Cat 



C A HAIOHT. 



Telephone 1747 Franklin 



Importers and Healers In Eire Arms, Ammunition and Fenc ing Qooda. 

Sole Agents for BALL1ST1TE (Dense! and EMPIRE (Bulk; Smokeless Powders 

and the REBLE GUN. 

A postal brings catalogue and "Shooting Facts" (third edition) 

BALLISTITF 
The Standard Dense Powder of the World 



SMITH GUNS 



LONGEST 
STRAIGHT RUNS 



At 8. F. Trap 8hootl"g 
Association 
May S3 23-84-S5 
VAUGHN, - - 7S Straights 
FE1 l)N Kit, - 02 

Also longest straight ran 
an. I tlml innnlri at l\xt> birds 





Loadod in O. r». w . Smols.eless. 
Winning- Higrhest Averasre at All Shoots. 



IF TOD WANT THE BEST A8K FOR 



California Powder Works 

FACTORY LOADED SHELLS. 

If Your Dealer don't keep them write the 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS — Office 330 Market St., San Francisco 

Manufacturers of HERCULES DYNAMITE, HERCULES GELATINE, CHAMPION 
IMPROVED BLASTING. BLACK BLASTING. BLACK SPORTING 
C. P. W. SMOKELESS and MILITARY 8MOKELESS. 
Also sell CAPS and FUSE. 

Parker Automatic Ejector 



All Kinds of Ammunition .. 



Hunter Arms Co., Fulton, N.Y. 

PHIL. B. BEKEART CO.. San Francisco. Coast Representative 



Catalog on 

application to 



SPRATTS PATENT. 



DOG 



CAKES 

REMEDIES 

SOAP. 



NEWARK, N. J. Send for free oopy of "DOG CULTURE." 8T 1. Oi ls. MO. 

Pacific Coast Branch — 132* Valencia Street, San Francisco. 

Agents for " SANITAS " Disinfectant. 



Twenty-First Annual Trials 

OF THB 

Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Advcrtitemtnlt under thil Mad one cent per itord 
per insertion. Cash In accompany order. 



ST. BERN A RI>8. 



TO BE RUN AT 



IT STUD— CHAMPION LE KING. ORAND- 
' v est beaded St Bernard on the Coast. Fee |2fJ. 
W. WALLACE, 58 Boyce St., San Franclaco. 



IM I.I. TERRIERS. 



The "Old Reliable's" 




Latest 
Attachment 



Bakersfield 



(KERN COUNTY) 



Commencing Monday, Jan. II, 1904 

Judge, W. 8. BELL, Pittsburg, Pa. 



l>OLL TERRIERS FOR SALE-TH E REGIS 
1 J tered stud Bull Terrier FLYER by Little 
Flyer, out of Lorna Doone. and two young bitches 
one year and a half old; cheap. GEORGE FUR- 
LONG. Anai'onda. Montana 



NEW "E. C." 

NEW "SCHULTZE" 
SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 

«. THE AMERICAN "E. C." and "SCHULTZE" Bunpowtor Co., Ltd 



ktaaata.ru r*d 



PHIL B BF.KEART CO.. Paclflo Coast Representative 



CAMPBELL'S 



EMOLLIO 
IODOFORM 



GALL CURE 



For GALL BACKS and SHOULDERS. CRUPPER 
SORES and SADDLE GALLS there is nono 
superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS USUAL 
For BARKED WIRK CUTS, CALKS. SCRATCH- 
ES BLOOD POISONED SORES an.l ABRASIONS 
OF THE SKIN It has no equal. 

It Is very adhesive and easily applied to a watery 
as well as a dry sore. 

Its use will absolutely prevent BLOOD POISON- 
ING. In this respect there Is no Gall, Cure offered 
which can justly even claim to be a competitor. 
We placed it on the market relying wholly on Its 
merit for success, and notwithstanding the fact that 
comparatively little has been done In the way of 
advertising the salesof 1SKJ0 wore VO per cent great- 
er than the aggregate sales of Gall Cure preceding 
that year. This increase was entirely due to Us 
MERITS, and from It we feel justllWn In raying that 
It Is THE OA LI. CURE OP THE VHTH CENTURY 
Ifls a quick and sure cure f"r those troublesome 
skin cracks under the fe ~ck v olch Injuro and often 
lay up race horses. 

; All Trainers Should Have It ia Their Stables 

PRICE:— 3 OZ. BOX, 25c; 1 LB. BOX, SI. 00. 
Read our "ad." on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy In next issue of this pap» r 

JAS. B. -CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs.,412 W. Madison St., Chicago, III. 

Sold by all Dealers In Harness and Turf Goods. If not In stock ask them to write any Jobber for It 




Members' Stake 

Annual Derby 

All-Aged Stake 

Champion Stake 

Entries for All Aged Stake rinse Dec 1 [1,1908 
W W. VAN ARSDALE (San Francisco) 
President. 
ALBERT BETZ, Secretary. 
No. 201 Parrott Bldg , 8. F., Cal 
•#-For Entry Blanks and information address tbo 
Secretary. 

COLLIES. 

The 
BEACH 

HILL 
Kennels 
955 
First St, 
San Jose 

CHAMPION HANOVER MONARCH 

(A. K. V. 8. B. B1»9H) by the great sire Ch. 
Ellwyn Astrologer from Ch Old Hall Moon 
Fee VIS. Pictures and Pedigree upon applica- 
tion. High-class Puppies for sale. 



COCKER SPANIEL8. 




"II l> 



AT STUD 

CUBA Or- KENWOOD 

(Qlenbelgh Jr.-Stellaj 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II) 

STOCKD ALE KENNELS 

K. M. I>OI>GR, Manager, 
Bakersfleld. Kern Co., 
I Boarding Polntar Pupplaa and wall brokea 
Dogs for sals 



QOCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PICJS 

roa SAI.B IK LOTS TO SUIT IT 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO 

2 08 California Straat, San Franol.o*, Oal, 



UOR SALE-COCKER SPANIEL PUPPIES 
1 by Ch. Hampton Goldle. Apply at junction 
old county and Redwood roads, Fniltvale, Alamada 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 

TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIER PUPPIES 
1 at $12 and 115 Sired by Champion Loyna 
Ruffian and Chasaplon Fighting Mao. Mrs. 

BRADLEY-DYNE. Saturna P. O B C. 



COLLIES. 

pOLLIE PUPS FOR SALE— BY PRIZE 
v winning imported sires and dams, lit for 
bench, ranch or farm Both sexes Prices accord- 
ing to quality. Correspondence solloited: all let- 
ters cheerfully answered THOS. S GRIFFITH. 
Box 1907, Spokane, Wash. 



ROSE HOTEL 

PLEAS AN TON. CAL. 

Enlarged. Rebuilt Twenty-five New Rooms 
Newly Furnished, Electric Lights, 
Running Water Up to date 
A. 8. OLNKY & SON - - Proprietors 

Chronic Bronchitis snd Catarrh ol the Bladder 

Cared In 48 Honrs. 



J 



1 



CAPSULES 



f 



8iiparlor to <!opalhs. Cnb.b. or Injralt 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



-liBAI.RItS IN- 



55 57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 
Tiupnom Maih 1» 



16 



[Januaki !l 11*04 



Telephone-. 

South 640 




^ vne Harness 

k^NoRSE BOO IS 



Francisco, Cal 



* 



1 



§ 
I 



i 
* 

h 



U. M. C. AT SEA GIRT, 




the annual military shoot, won the Wim= 
bledon Cup, Capt. Richards, Ohio, score 
91=100. 

Troop A, of New York, won the 
Revolver Team Match, using U. M. C. 
.38 S. & W. special cartridges, score 849. 

Leech Cup Match, shot at 800, 900, 
and 1000 yards, was also won with 
U. M. C. .30=40 cartridges, by C. B. Winder, 
Ohio, score 94=105. 

T he Thomas Bullet 

now used in all U. M. C. .30 Government 
cartridges was used by practically every 
rifleman in eveiy match where Government* 
made ammunition was not required. These 
facts speak volumes for U. M. C. military 
and big game cartridges. 

C M . C. .30-40 cartridges won the International 
Paltua Trophy at HKl, > . England, against the military 
rllle teams of the world 




The Union Metallic Cartridge Company 



Agency, 313 BROADWAY, 

NEW YORK CITY. 



Bridgeport. Conn. 



Depot, 86-88 FIRST ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

E. E. DRAKE, Mgr. 



i 



# 



i 



i 
§ 



••- ••■ ■•■ ••■ 



4HMMMMMMMM* : ******************* 




REPEATING SHOT GUNS 

A CHANCE FOR A DOUBLE 

A QUESTION often asked about Repeating Shotguns is, "How quick can a second shot befired with 
**■ them?" Shooters that have used Repeaters answer with one accord : "Doubles" are just as easy to 
make with a WiNCHESTER REPEATING SHOTGUN as they are with a double barreled 
gun. The third shot that a Winchester Repeater gives often bags a badly crippled bird which otherwise 
would get away. Winchester Repeating Shotguns are made in "Take Down" styles in 12 and 16 gauge. 




Glabrough, Bolcher & Go. 



GUNS 
Sun Goods 



♦S-Send for Catalogue. 




FISHING 

Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 



FACTORY . , 
LOADED 



SHELLS 



DU PONT 
"E. C." 
SCHUXTZE 
HAZARD 



SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BALLI8TTTE 
LAFLIN <fc RAND 
'INFALLIBLE " 



What More do vou Want? 



2 



(The gveelfev mtfc ^povi&txxan 



TJandary 16, l!)04 




TRADE 




MIS 



5.QO WITH WRITTEN GUARANTEE 



HARNESS and SADDLES 

HIGH-CLASS 
FINISH AND 
WORKMANSHIP 
AT 

MODERATE 
PRICES, 

THE 

BIG STOHE 

JEPSEN BROS CO..NO 

1145-47 Market St. San Francisco 

Speed, Breeding and Individuality 




RITA H. 2:11 1-4 

Pacing Mare by McKinney 2:11 1-4 

ELECTRO McKINNEY 

Brown Colt, Four-Year-Old Trotter by McKinney 2:11 1-4 

HIT A H. is a dark brown mare who stands nearly 18 hands high, and will weigh in raoing trim 
about 105(1 lbs This mare has bad this year a very remarkable record. She started In the North 
wosturn Circuit in the States of Oregon and Washington, and out of eight starts won her first seven 
races and only lost (our heats during the entire circuit, and has a pacing record of fcllJt*- The mare 
is five years old and Is excellent on the road. She does not pull or lug, and a lady can drive her 
anywhere. Last spring she trotted a workout mile in 2:18V4 and repeated in 2:164, after only seven 
weeks' work. Her owner has driven her in -i in the Los Angeles Driving Club races, she having 
won all of them In which she started. This mare can step two heats below 2:IU. 

ELECTRO McKINNEY is a brown stallion foaled in 1900, and stands 15 hands 1 inch in height. 
He trotted a full mile as a two-year-old in 3:31 last quarter in 35 seconds, and when a three-year- 
old a full mile In 2:21^, last quarter in 32 seconds He is perfectly gaited and a grand individual in 
every respect. Weighs about 950 lbs. ELECTRO McKINNEY is bred in the purple, and is one of 
the best sons of McKinney alive to day McKinney Is undoubtedly the greatest sire for his age. 
living or dead. ELECTRO McKINNEY was not raced last year, being only a three-year-old and 
not entered in any stakes it was decided to hold him over. 

These horses are all r'ght and there is not a thing the matter with them, but my business 
demands are suou that I cannot afford to devote any time to racing them. For prices and further 
particulars address 

BYRON ERKENBRECHER, 

301 CITKRIER It I I I I ' I N ( ,, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Or Inquire at Office of ItKKKDEK AND SPORTSMAN. 



A Sidney Stallion With Earning Capacity 



In pursuance of my intention to retire from the business of breeding horses, 
and having disposed of all my broodmares at auction, I now offer at private sale 

the stallion 

William Harold 2:i3i-4. 

His sire is the great Sidney 2;19j, grandsire of the champion trotter of the 
world, Lou Dillon 1:58}, and his dam the great race and broodmare Cricket 2:10 
(dam of four in the list) by Steinway, the greatest son of Strathmore. 

WILLIAM HAROLD is a producer The only two of his get to start are 
that wonderfully fast trotter Janice 2:08} and the pacer Dan Burns 2:15. 
WILLIAM HAROLD'S services in the stud were very limited up to three years 
••a- :■ i - I His weanlings, yearlings and two-year-olds are very prom- 
ising and have size, good looks and great natural speed, besides being uniform in 
color, nearly all bays. He is a sure foal getter, is in the very best condition, sound 
and healthy, and with ordinary good business management can earn in the stud 
in l'.»04 the price asked for him. 

For tabulated pedigree and full particulars, address 

H. W, MEEK, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



r 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, 



C ALIFORNIA. 



V.. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-five years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 

WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 

of this most famous HOTEL. 



Percheron and Belgian Stallions. 

Three importations this season of prize-winning Percherons, Belgians and German Coachers and 
Catalan Spanish and Majorca Jacks. I have the largest Draft and Coach Horses in America, and 
will sell more quality for the money than yau can find anywhere. Come and see for yourself. 

W. L, De CLOW. 



THE FARMER'S SUPPLY OF 
THE MIDDLE WEST 

Cedar Rapids (Iowa) Jack Parm. 



Pedigrees Tabulated ^«ZZ"*Z™bI™Z?A 

SPORTSMAN, 36 Geary street, San Francisco, Cal. 



On Broken Down, Weak, Sprained and Ruptured Ligaments and 
Tendons Its Power is Unfailing. 

No Man need see his Horse suffer and become Incapacitated. 

"SAVF-THF-HRrKF" POSITIVELY AND PERMANENTLY CURES BONE AND BOG 

as no harm can result from destruction of hair or scalding of limb. uuuis. 

Cured horses are absolute certainties as to the possibility of the remedy for your own oase Such 

carHed 'Ia VE ?THMOM&l S^^SSSS m6n Wb ° 8e , «»«M««y can be readily ascertained, have 
™h „ bAVE-THE-HORSE over skepticism, prejudice and uncertainty. Send for the booklet 
make it wrltten guarantee, which is as binding to proteot you as the best legal talent ronld 



SS.OO 



BOTTLE, 



Written guarantee with every bottle. Need of second bottle improbable, except in rarest 
cases. If your case s different we advise frankly as to possibility of the remedy effecting a .cure 
Give veternarlan's diagnosis, if he is competent. Describe age, development, location of swollingai 
lameness and way horse carries and holds leg. nuinan 

$5.00 a bottle at all druggists and dealers, or sent express prepaid. 

TROY CHEMICAL CO., Manufacturers, TROY, N. Y. 

D. E NEWELL, 519 Mission St.. San Francisco, Cal., Pacific Coast Agent 



FOR SALE 

first-class condition. For price and further particulars address 

A. FORBES, 



Or BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5615 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, Cal. 



J I Your stable is not complete without Quinn's [ 

I Ointment. An infalJible cure for all ordi- 
I nary horse afflictions. Follow the example 
set by the leading horsemen of the -world and 
your stable shelf will always hold a bottle of 

Quinn's Ointment 

A. L. Thomas, Snpt. Canton Farm, Joliet, Til., remarks, 
lonclosoyoa amount for six bottles of Qainn's Ointmi-nt. 




A #» uotne» oi vuinn rt ui nlmenl. 

,. '£ na /'~" 8 must confess it does all you claim for 
IV JTor Curbs, SpliDts, Spavins, WindpaSs or Bunches. 



Price $i.oo per package. 
Sold by all druggists, 
or sent by mail. 
W. B. EDDY & CO., Whitehall, N. Y. 



TRY IT. 



YES 

FIRST-CLASS PASSENGERS 
SHOULD GO 



by the 



Golden State Limited 

A train embodying all 
the comforts and 
luxuries of home. 

San Francisco 

TO 

Chicago 
every day 

5 P. M. 

THROIGH WITHOUT CHANGE 
VIA EL PASO. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 



CALIFORNIA 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IH 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 
Artistic Designing. 
•«fl Miction St., ear. Tint, Baa Fran else* 




All Druggists and Harness 
Dealers or Vita Oil Co., 

1533 Buchanan St. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

J, A, M cKerron and J. O'Kane, Agts 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 2(1,000 gradu- 
ates; SO teachers: 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually plaoed In positions. Send for oatalogae. 



E. P. HEALD. President. 



SITUATION WANTED 

AS TRAINER AND RACE DRIVER, BY A 
thoroughly competent man, from the East, 
with experience. First-class references as to 
ability and charaoter. Address T. C. HARRIS, 
care of West Ranoh, Fernando, Cal. 



January 16, iat4j 



tithe gvvcbcv mifc *$p&vt#max\ 



8 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

T. W. KELLEY, PBOPRirrOR. 

furf and Sporting Authority ot the Pacific Coast. 

— orrici— 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O- BOX 2300. 
TEl^XPHOHt: Black 886. 



Terms— One Year 93. Six Month* 91.78, Three Month* SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Keu.ey, 39 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 16, 1904. 



THE HOLIDAY EDITIONS of the horse papers 
devoted to the harness horse were most excellent 
this year. The Bortt BeotCTO, The Horseman, The 
Hoi;*>: Wnrlil, '/'/,. Truth r " ml /'•ctrand Tlx Am> ricu ,1 
Borne Breeder all published beautifully illustrated and 
most interesting numbers. The wealth of advertising; 
matter displayed by each and every one is evidence 
that the harness horse business is in a thrifty 
condition. 



THE MANY FLATTERING NOTICES of the 
Christmas edition of the Breeder and Sports- 
man contained in our exchanges and the numerous 
complimentary letters received from our subscribers 
in regard to the same have been gratefully received 
and read. We foreeo the pleasure of printing them 
as they would 611 several pages, but we appreciate 
them just the same and are glad that the edition was 
so well received. We return thanks to each and every 
one, editor and subscriber, who has paid us this com- 
pliment, and hope the new year will be most pleasant 
and prosperous to all. 



THE OUTLOOK for harness racing in California 
this year is good. Pleasanton will open the cir- 
cuit with a good program of twelve races which will 
be printed in the Breeder and Sportsman next 
week. The Breeders Association prints its program 
this ween and hangs up $13,700 for a four days' meet- 
ing. Vallejo and Napa can both be depended upon to 
give good meetings and Fetaluma will doubtless be in 
lioe. It is reported that Woodland will give one 
of its usual good meetings but if the directors of 
the association there do not see their way clear to 
giving a meeting the Breeders Association can very 
easily be induced to give a meeting there and make 
the circuit complete. A member of the Speed Com- 
mittee of the State Agricultural Society is authority 
for the statement that the society will offer 82000 for 
a slow class trot and $1500 for a slow class pace at the 
State Fair this year, and that the balance of the 
harness program will consist of good purses. Salinas 
and Hollister will both give good meetings and San 
Jose may be in line. The outlook for harness racing 
in California in 1904 is excellent. 



Answers to Correspondents. 

Harvey Boone, Bodie, Cal.— The stallion Decla- 
ration 2128 was sired by Young Jim 2129, he by George 
Wilkes. The dam of Declaration is Lady Bunker by 
Mambrino Fatchen 53. She is the dam of Guy 
Wilkes 2:15}, El Mahdi 2:25* and the producing sire 
William L., sire of Axtell 2:12. Lady Bunker's dam 
was Lady Dunn 'dam of Joe Bunker 2:19}) by Ameri- 
can Star 14, next dam the Capt. Roberts mare, 
called an inbred Messenger. 

T. II. L , San Jose. — Molly Drew is standard and 
registered. Her record is 2:27 in the sixth heat of a 
race. She had a trial of 2:23. She was sired by 
Winthrop 505, son of the Drew Horse 11 1, and her 
dam was Fanny Fern (the dam of Balkan 2:15 and 
Fred Arnold 2:33) by Jack Hawking, son of Boston. 
Molly Drew was a chestnut mare, 16 hands high, with 
a strip in her face and off hind ankle and near hind 
pastern white. 



A. Ottinger, the well known ticket broker of this 
city, purchased the Diablo stallion Daedalion 2:11 at 
the Chase sale Thursday evening, his bid being $700. 
He has turned Daedalion over to Ed Lafferty, who 
will take him to Plea?anton next week, and prepare 
him for racing on the California Circuit. Daedalion 
was bred by Geo. H. Fox, of Clements, Cal., who 
consigned him to the sale. He is a magnificent in- 
dividual and has proved himself a eame race horse. 
It is believed Be can beat his record this year, and 
certainly Mr. Ottinger secured him at a bargain. 



PALO ALTO'S FINAL SALE. 

Yearlings Are Successfully Sold and Bring 
Excellent Prices. 
Does it pay to raise trotting^ jolts and sell at auction 
when a farm has established the reputation of pro- 
ducing the goods? The sale of the Palo Alto foals of 
1903, a bunch of seventeen colts and fillies less than a 
year old, held by Fred H. Chase A Co., live stock 
auctioneers of this city, Thursday night, proves that 
it does. The seventeen head averaged $314 each, the 
highest priced one being a black colt by McKinney 
out of Sweet Hose by Electioneer and hebrought $700. 
Mr. John A. Cole of San Bernardino was the pur- 
chaser. 

Never has there been a larger crowd of more repre- 
sentative breeders gathered in San Francisco than 
attended this sale, and there were buyers in tho crowd 
from Washington, Oregon and tha far south. The 
bidding was lively and tho final sale a complete suc- 
cess. Superintendent Frank W. Covey announced 
tho breeding of each foal as It was led into the ring, 
and bids would come before he could comploto the 
remarks, so eBger wore the buyers. There were at 
least fifty persons who came prepared to pay from 
$150 to $200 for a colt or filly that had to go away 
disappointed. 

After the Palo Alto horses were sold a number of 
colts, fillies and aged horses consigned by different 
individuals were disposed of at fair prices. C. A. 
Durfee, who with a friend owned four McKinneys in 
partnership consigned them to this sale, but they 
went for very low figures. Strange as it may seem 
the two mares by McKinney, out of the great brood- 
mare Stemwinder, dam of Directum 2:05}, were about 
tho least attractive of the get of McKinney that were 
ever led into a salesriog. They were small, and their 
individuality not such as would attract breeders. As 
far as looks were concerned, they showed that the 
'"nick" had not been a successful one. It is more than 
probable, however, that when bred to good stalliocs 
they will both produce speed of a high order. The 
full list of the horses sold is given below: 

yearlings— foals of 1903. 

Bay filly by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Cressida2:18j ay 
Palo Alto, to Jasper Paulsen for $130. 

Black colt by McKinney, dam Avena 2:191 by Palo 
Alto, to Geo. L. Warlow for $310. 

Bay colt by Monbells, dam Maiden 2:23 by Election- 
eer, to Robert Christy for $185. 

Black filly by McKinney, dam Elden 2:191 by Nep- 
hew, to James Thompeon for $200. 

Chestnut colt by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Palita 2:10 
by Palo Alto, to E D. Dudley for $325. 

Bay filly by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Novelist 2:2" by 
Norval, to Richard Smith for $155. • 

Bay filly by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Liska 2:28J by 
Electioneer, to Walter Mastin for $130. 

Bay filly by McKinney, dam Lucyneer 2:27 by Elec- 
tioneer, to Joe Cuicello for $400. 

Black filly by McKinney, dam Aerolite by Palo Alto, 
to Tuttle Bros, for $525. 

Bay filly by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Adbuta by Ad- 
vertiser, to N. K. West for $150. 

Black colt by McKinney, dam Sweet Rose by Elec- 
tioneer, to John A. Cole for $700. 

Brown colt by Nazote 2:281, dam Gertrude Russell 
2:234 by Electioneer, to A. Phillips for $75. 

Bay colt by Mendocino, dam Mary Osborne 2:28{ by 
Azmoor, to Joe Cuicello for $590. 

Bay filly by Monbells, dam Wild flower 2:21 by 
Electioneer, to n. B. Muzzy for $300. 

Bay filly by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Expressive 2:12$ 
by Electioneer, to H. S. Hogoboom for $330. 

Bay colt by Monbells, dam Manzanita 2:1G by Elec- 
tioneer, toG. Purringor for $405. 

Brown filly by Mendocino, dam Lulu Wilkes by 
George Wilkes, to Tuttle Bros, for $430. 

TWO-YEAR-OLDS, foals of 1902. 

Bay colt by Iran Alto, dam Aria 2:10} by Bernal, 
to Joe Cuicello for MfiOi 

Brown filly by McKinney, dam Sweet Rose by 
Electioneer, to John A. Cole for 1390. 

Bay filly by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Liska 2:28 by 
Hlectioneer, to II. S. Hogoboom for $260. 

FOUR-YEAR-OLDS— FOALS OF 1900. 

Brown colt by McKinney, dam Helena 2:1 I] by 
Electioneer, to A. Ottinger for $530. 

Bay mare by Dexter Prince, dam Lady Agnes by 
Electioneer to, Monroe Salisbury for $325. 

IIKOOD.M A RES. 

Marion 2:20|, bay mare foaled 1x8,3, by Piedmont, 
dam Lady Morgan by Hambletonian 10, to P. II. 
Dimond for $135. 

Sonoma 2:28, gray mare foaled 1883, by Electioneer, 
dam Sontag Mohawk (dam of eight in list) by Mo- 
hawk Chief, to H. Scott for $95. 



CONSIGNED BY GEO. H. FOX, CLEMENTS. 

Daedalion 2:11 bay stallion foaled 1895 by Diablc, 
dam Grace by Buccaneer, to A. Ottinger. 

CONSIGNED BY C. A. DURFEE St CO. 

Johnny McKenzie\ brown gelding foaled 1901, by 
MeKinney, dam Babe by Ferdinand, to Henry Sanders 
for $1(50. 

Daisy B , black mare foaled 1898. by McKinney, dam 
Stt mwinder (dam of Directum 2:05}) by Ventura, to 
John A Colo for $140. 

Twilight, black mare foaled 1899, by MeKinney, 
dam Stemwinder by Venture, to N. K. West for $225. 

Bessie I) , black mare by McKinney, dam by son of 
Venture, to Dr. Helms for $245. 

CONSIGNED ItY GEO, A. DAVIS, PLEASANTON. 

Charlottine, black filly foaled 1902, by Charles 
Derby, dam Miss Direct by Direct, to Dr McLaughlin 
for $280. 

Rey VerB, black filly by Rey Direct, dam Anteera 
by Anleeo, to W. J. Simpson for I860. 

Anona, black fl'ly foaled 1902, by Charles Derby, 
dam May by Anteer, to H. Scott for $210. 

Mamie Rey, black filly foaled 1902, by Rey Direct, 
dam Mamie H. by Kentucky Volunteer, to J. Rolph 
for $250. 

CONSIGNED BY OTHER OWNERS. 

Bay colt foaled 1903 by Mendocino, dam Carmine by 
Electricity, to Jasper Paulsen for $245. 

Glen Rose, bay gelding by Falrose, dam Mischief 
2:23 by Brown Jug, to Wm. Hilby for $300. 

N. L. B. 2:21$ pacer, foaled 1897, by Diablo, dam 
Alice Bell by Washington, to J. Mitchel for $400. 

Mauos, bay gelding foaled 1901, by Altivo, dam 
Mano by Piedmont, to Arthur Jacobs for $100. 

Jim, bay gelding foaled 1898, by Sejmour Wilkes, 
dam by Geo. M. Patchen Jr , to William Helby for 
1175. 

By Mack, bay stallion foaled 1900, by McKinney, 
dam By By by Nutwood, to A. G. Fairchild for $275. 



OCCIDENT STAKE OF 1004. 

Entries That Made Third Payment on 
January 2, 1004. 

Alex Brown's chc by Prince Ansel-Nosegay. 

T. W. Barstow's b f True Heart 

W. C. Durfee's b c by McKinney-Leonor; blk c by 
McKinney-Belle. 

C. A. Durfee's blk c Almaden; b c Johnnie Mc- 
Kenzie. 

W. S. Maben's b f Geraldine. 
E. A. Gammon's br f Easter Direct. 
La Siesta Ranch's b f Wanda II. 
Geo. J. Morgan's br f Neorgard. 
H. W. Meek's b f Tabitha. 
W. Mastin's b c Marvin Wilkes. 
Oak wood Stock Farm's br f Kalana: br f Lucy 
Parry; b f Bella Direct; b f Dircctola; b c Slilwell. 
Rosedale Stock Farm's b f by St. Whips-Fila D. 
John Rowen's b f Bells. 
E. Z. Miller's b c Stam Boy. 

Thos. Smith's blk c Gen. Frisbie; b c Gen. Delary. 
C. L. Jones' b c Carlokin. 

Jas. II. Gray's blk c Carakina; b c Calamanco. 
Geo. A. Kelly's b c Bonnie McK. 
Geary A Grindle's b f Clara Oakley. 
C. H. WilliamB' ch c Collis H. 



That splendid broodmare Belle Medium, dam of 
Stam B 2:11} and owned by Tuttle Bros, of Rocklin, 
was found dead in her box stall one morning this week. 
She was bred by the late W. T. Withers at Fairlawn 
Stock Farm in Kentucky and was foaled in 1**3, being 
twenty-one years old at tho time of her death Last 
year Bhe was not In good condition and lost her foal 
by Nutwood Wilkes. She was then bred to Mendo- 
cino and would have foaled next month. Her death 
is not only a groat Iorh to Tuttle Bros., but to the 
breeding interests of the State. She was by Happy 
Medium, dam Argenta by Almont Lightning, gran- 
dam Mary Adams by Mambrino Patchen. 



Sam (iamblo Is out again after a severe illness, and 
attended the sale of Palo Alto and other horses at 
Fred II. ChaHe A- Co.'s salesyard Thursday night, 
where he materially assisted in making the sola a 
success. 

Honry Helman came down to the Palo Alto sale and 
will visit Pleasanton, San Jose and other points 
before returning to Portland. He expects to bring 
his horses to Pleasanton about March 1st. 



Sam Hoy has the five year old stallion Jules Verne 
at Winters and will breed him to a few mares before 
getting him ready for tho races. Jules Verne is by 
Domonio 2:11} and is a promising trotter. 



Payments were made January 2d on 28 three-year- 
olds entered In tho Occident Stake of this year. It 
should be a great race. Tho list appears in another 
column. 



4 



©Its gveeftcv anh ^purtsmon 



[January 16, 1804 



JOTTINGS. Bg 



THE CLAIM has been often made by observing 
horsemen in California that while the get of 
Diablo 2:00) are generally fast two and three year 
olds they will be better race horses if they are waited 
on until they have matured. It is argued that their 
natural speed is so great in colthood that the majority 
of trainers will speed them too much and as a con- 
sequence put them on the shelf before they have 
reached maturity. There have been many instances 
during the past few years to support this idea, and 
the fact that numerous green aged horses by Diablo 
are just now being developed in California and show- 
ing wonderful speed is further evidence of its cor- 
rectness. One of the best I have seen for a long time 
time is a bay gelding six tears old by Diablo that is 
owned by Walter Trefry and is being worked by him 
at l'leasanton. This gelding was a trotter up to five 
or six years ago, but never showed speed enough to 
hurt him. Walter came to the conclusion that pacing 
is his natural gait and put the hopples on him. After 
four weeks, during which he was worked very 
moderately the gelding stepped a mile in 2:14] last 
Saturday, and did it so handily that only those hold- 
ing watches suspected he was going that fast. I saw 
the horse flash past the wire and heard one of the 
numerous "rail riders'' remark as he snapped his 
watch back that the mile was in 2:14], and went down 
to the stall to see how the gelding stood it. He did 
not look as if he had been a mile better than three 
minutes and the breath from his nostrils would as 
the saying is "hardly blow out a candle. " A better 
looking horse is not to be seen at the Pleasanton 
track. He has a very neat bony head, nicely turned 
body, and smooth round hips. His feet and legs are 
just about perfection. He is a bright bay, stands, I 
should judge, about 16.2 and will weigh, probably, a 
thousand pounds. He looks to me like a 2:05 pacer 
and one that will go without the straps when he is 
ready to race. He is bred all right on his dam's side 
as she is the Palo Alto bred mare May by thorough- 
bred Wildidle, second dam the famous mare May- 
llower 2:30$ by St. Clair. May is the dain of Wildmay 
2:30, that produced L. 96 2:16). 



would not surprise me if she trotted in 2:05 when she 
has more age. Sheis thesort that has so much speed 
she hardly knows what to do with it, and a year 
or two of quiet road work would doubtless calm her 
down so that she would be reliable. It is said that 
she is a well behaved roadster now, but she seems 
very excitable on the track. Henry Sanders is im- 
proving her very much, however, and may make a 
race mare out of her this year. If she gets to going 
steadily in company she will be a hard one for the 
free for all horses to beat as she is game as a pebble. 



When the late Dr. Hicks came to California from 
Iowa he brought with him a mare called Flash by 
Kgmont and out of Lightfoot by Flaxtail. In 1892 
Flash went to Oak wood Park Stock Farm and became 
a member of the broodmare ranks there. She was 
bred to Creole and produced the fast mare Javelin 
2:08]. She was then mated with Charles Derby every 
year and gave to the turf Flare Up 2:14 and Salli^ 
Derby 2:19). While she was owned by Dr. Hicks she 
had produced Walker 2:23$, so she has four in the 
list. A few months ago Ben Chaboya sold to Mr. J. 
D. Springer of Pleasanton a big pacer by Charles 
Derby out of this mare Flash, and one day this week 
Mr. Springer worked him a half in 1:00$. This geld- 
ing is a large horse six years old and is a great pros- 
pect for the slow classes this year, as he is eligible to 
all races, having no record. 



Barney Simpson, who is training quite a string of 
horses at Pleasanton, headed by the very fast and 
promising green pacer Arner, own brother to Diablo 
2:09), called my attention to the fact, which I had 
overlooked, that old Bertha has a new one in the list 
this year, her three-year-old Owyho by Owyhee 2:11 
having taken a three-year-old 
pacing record of 2:22] in the East 
this year. Owyho is the hand- 
some chestnut colt that Ed Mills 
and Henry Sanders bought at the 
Oakwood Park Farm last spring 
and consigned to the Blue Ribbon Sf"r 
sale at Cleveland, where he was 
purchased by William McFarland 
of Pentuylvar ia for$1010. Owyho 
is the first performer for Owyhee, 
who was sold to Australian parties 
two years ago, and is the sixth 
standard performer for Bertha. 
The daughter of Alcantara is now 
the dam of six with records of 
2:22] or better, as follows: Diablo 
2:09), Elf 2:12$, Ed Lafferty 2:16$, 
Demonio 2:11), Don Derby '?.:04$ 
and Owyho 2:22). She has also 
produced Jar Eft* Bee that took a 
yearling record of 2:26.1. Arner, 
her foal of 1898, will be raced this 
year and will go into the 2:15 list 
without much trouble. Bertha 
has established a wonderful family 
of pacers, and there now seems to be great prospects 
of her son Diablo adding to his reputation by siring 
some very fast trotters, there being several green 
ones by him now in training in California that are 
showing 2:10 speed at the diagonal gait. 



Over at Corte Madera in Marin county, a few miles 
across the bay from San Francisco, the little chestnut 
gelding Little Albert 2:10, now twenty years old, is 
taking his ease in a pasture and enjoying the declining 
years of a good old age. He is still owned by Mr. W. 
B. Bradbury, the capitalist of this city, who says that 
the son of Albert W., having been good to him, will 
never want for anything during the rest of his days. 
It was in the year 1891, when Little Albert was seven 
years old, that he made his memorable campaign on 
the Grand Circuit and won something over twenty 
thousand dollars for Mr. Bradbury. He started nine 
times that year, winning six races and being second 
in the other three. One of the races in which he got 
second money was the 810,000 stake for the 2:20 class, 
in which nine heats were trotted and was finally won 
by Mambrino King's daughter Nightingale. Little 
Albert won the fifth and the seventh heats and made 
a dead heat with the mare In the fourth. He closed 
the year with a mark of 2:17). The following year he 
won four races in the free for all class on the Grand 
Circuit and reduced his record to 2:10). In 1893, he 
was campaigned again in the big ring and took his 
record at Cleveland where he won the free for all 
purse of $2000 and defeated Nightingale, Walter E., 
Lord Clinton, Rylacd T. and others in a hard fought 




at the same time advising that he sell her to the first 
sucker he could find. Now Jeems is a pretty good off 
hand speaker whenever he wants to let loose his 
supply of oratory, but he took all the chaffing and 
kept silent. Last week, on Wednesday, he took 
Monica out while the rail was occupied with all the 
"dockers" and drove her a mile in 2:20) very easily. 
Some of the onlookers remarked that she would 
probably never be seen on the track agair after that, 
and just to show them that the old mare is in good 
condition, James was out with her again by the time 
the regulation 20 minutes was up and drove her a 
repeat mile in 2:19. Monica acted as though she 
liked the game, and Thompson is pretty sure he will 
beat her record with her by the first of March. 



Mention has been made in this department hereto- 
fore of a six-year-old gelding by Diablo that John 
Gordon owns and has in training at the San Jose 
track. He Is a very promising trotter and looks like 
a 2:10 prospect according to those who have seen him, 
and he was never even broke until he was five years 
old. Henry Sanders has In his string at the present 
time a four-year-old mare by Diablo, owned by Mr. R. 
P. M. Greeley of Oakland, that has two minute speed 
at the trot. She was worked some as a three-year-old 
and showed remarkably well, but has that highly 
nervous temperament that keeps many a youngster 
from doing Its best. If nothing happens this mare it 



Will Again Stand at Pleasanton. 

Stam B. 2:11), that was one of the greatest colt 
trotters ever seen on the Pacific Coast, taking a trot- 
ting record of 2:15$ as a three-year-old and reducing 
it the next year in his four-year-old form to 2:11], 
will again make a season at Pleasanton under the 
management of Samuel Gamble. No stallion in Cali- 
fornia has been more talked about during the past few 
months than this son of Stamboul2:0T$, and the fact 
every foal he has sired that has been trained has 
shown race horse speed has caused breeders to con- 
clude that Sam Gamble was not far wrong when he 
took the horse two years ago and predicted that he 
would be a great sire. 

On a recent trip through the country Mr. Gamble 
made investigation to ascertain how many foals 
Stam B. has that are older than yearlings, and after 
energetic research he could find but twenty-eight all 
told, barring the foals of 1903. The Tuttle Brothers 
of Rocklin, owners of Stam B., have five, M. C. 
Delano one, Mr. Whitney of Rocklin one, Mr. Ryder 
of Loomis three, Dr. Whitter of Walnut Grove one, 
Mr. Sharon of Gait one, Mr. Hodges of Los ADgeles 
one, Geo. T. Beckers two, Mr. Orr of Gait one, Mr. 
Springer of Pleasanton one, E. A. Gammon one, J. 
H. Dresser of Isleton one. Mr. Matthews one, Judge 
P. J. Shields one, J. M. Madison one, parties in Rock- 
lin, San Francisco and Stockton one each, Mrs. Cal- 
lendine of Sacramento one. The following of his get 
have started: Swift B., three-year-old record 2:16), 
winner of three races and second money in both the 
Occident and Stanford Stakes of 1903; The Jester, 
winner of third money in Occident Stake of 1903; 
Rosalind, that started in three races at Sacramento 
as a three-year-old In 1902 and won two second and 
one third money, finishing close up to the winner of a 
heat in 2:18. These are all the foals by Stam B. that 
Mr. Gamble has heen able to account for after an ex- 
tended search. The reason for the limited number of 
his foals is that Stam B. was in training up to 1900, 
made but very short seasons in the stud and was not 
largely patronized. 

Stam B. is still a young horse, having been foaltd 
in 1892. He was hred to about fifty choice mares last 
season, a few more than he served the year before 
All horsemen who saw him when the late Thos. 
Keating had him know that Stam B. possessed 2:05 
speed. As a race horse his reputation is national. 
His ancestors have proven to be successful progenitors 
of world's champions both on the tracks and in the 
show rings. 

Stam B.'s blood lines are so well known that it is 
only necessary to say that he is by the great Stam- 
boul out of Belle Medium 2:20 by Happy Medium, 
grandsire of the dam of Lou Dillon 1:58$, second dam 
by Almont Lightning, sire of the dam of Zombro 
2:11, etc. 

Stam B. will make the season of 1904 at Pleasanton 
at the low fee of $40. On June 1st he will leave there 
for Salem, Oregon, at the request of a number of 
owners of high class mares who reside in that vicinity. 
Those who send their mares to Stam B. this season 
will be wise. He is one of the coming great sires. 



OWYHO (3) 2:28 1-4 

race of five heats. He started in the memorable 
Columbian free for all at Chicago that year but was 
not in the money at the end of the race which con- 
tinued for three days. After his racing days were 
over, Mr. Bradbury used him as a road horse, and up 
to the time he quit driving him, a year ago, few 
horses could outbrush the little fellow on the road. 
It is a pleasure to know that he Is now living a life of 
ease and luxury in his old days and that his owner 
fully appreciates the fact that the little horae is 
entitled to all the good things he gets. 



James Thompson turned a trick on the wise ones at 
the Pleasanton track last week. He attended a sale 
in San Francisco a few weeks ago and bought the 
mare Monica 2:15 by McKinney. When he reached 
Pleasanton with her the boys all gave him the laugh, 
telling him that Monica was a has been and would 
never be able to pace a mile much better than 2:30, 



Grand Circuit Dates. 



The Board of Stewards of the Grand Circuit will 
meet at Cleveland, Ohio, January 20th, to arrange 
dates for the various tracks of that compact for next 
year. Grosse Pointe will open the circuit as usual, 
starting on the third Monday in July. Just how the 
other tracks will follow is a matter that can not be 
told until the meeting. Last season there was some 
dissatisfaction with the dates awarded, and some 
shifts were made In the order of the meetings. To 
avoid this occurring again great care will be taken in 
arranging the dates so as to accommodate all the 
tracks as well as possible. It is rumored that Secre- 
tary J. B. Pettit of the Board of Stewards will resign. 
Mr. Pettit is also secretary of the Detroit Driving 
Club. 

On a hot day drink Jaokson's Napa Soda lemonade 
and be refreshed. 



January 16, 1904] 



5 



HORSES AT PLEASANTON. 

List of Trainers and the Horses Now Being 
Trained There. 

The following list of horses in training at the Pleas- 
anton track was compiled during the last week in 
December, and was complete up to that time. Since 
then several trainers have reached the famous track 
with their horses, so that more than two hundred 
head of trotters and pacers are now stabled there. 
Among the late arrivals are twelve bead from Walnut 
Grove Stock Farm, headed by Aristo 2:17J, winner of 
the Occident and Stanford stakes of 1902. They are 
in charge of Charles Spencer. We will give the 
names and breeding of this string in a future issue. 
The names of the trainers and the horses in their 
charge are as follows: 

MONROE SALISBURY. 
TRAINERS, ( HAS. DE R YI'BK AND CBAS. EDWARDS. 

Two-Year-OldE — Duke Direct by Direct, dam by 
Anteeo; Baroness Direct by Direct, dam by Baron 
Wilkes. 

Three-Year-Olds — Bay filly, pacer, by Directum 
Kelly, dam by Nelson: Dick Walsh, pacer, by Direct, 
dam by William L.; East View Lass, trotter, by 
Directum Kelly, dam by Alcantara; East View Queen 
by Directum Kelly, dam by Baron Wilkes; Miss Bet- 
terment by Directum Kelly, dam by Betterton; Prin 
cess Athel by Directum Kelly, dam by Walkill Prince; 
Sophia Direct by Direct, dam by Robert McGregor; 
California Cresceus, trotter, by Mendocino, dam by 
Boodle. 

Four-Year-Olds — Cythera Direct by Jersey Wilkes; 
East View Maiden by Directum Kelly; Lagatia by 
Direct, dam by Ansel: black gelding by Directum 
Kelley, dam by Atlantic; East View Belle by Directum 
Kelly, dam by Betterton. 

Aged Horses — Alma Vista by Direct, dam by Baron 
Wilkes: Consuella S. 2:1 2J by Directum, dam by Nut- 
wood; Direct well by Direct, dam by Allerton; Direct 
View 2:141 by Direct, dam by Mansfield; Fred Direct 
by Direct, dam by Harry Plummer; Leonora 2:18} by 
Mendocina, dam by Messenger Duroc; Phyllis Kelly 
by Direct, dam by Anteeo; Venus Direct by Direct, 
dam by Marquette; Mush 2:08} by Lottery Ticket, 
dam by Richard's Elector; Monroe 2:12$ by Seymour 
Wilkes, dam by Columbus; Judge Green 2:10\ by 
Directum, dam by Anteeo Jr.: Baron Oaks, bay stal- 
lion by Oakland Baron, dam by Baron Wilkes; Dick, 
bay gelding by Lottery Ticket, dam by Richard's 
Elector; bay mare by Directum, dam by Bell Alta; 
bay mare by Richard's Elector; Flora Grand by Le 
Grand. Chestnut colt by Mendocino. 

BEN CBAHOYA. 

Guy McKinney, black stallion by McKinney, dam 
by Guy Wilkes; Annie V. by James Madi6on, dam hy 
Steinway; Erosmont by Eros, dam by Almont; Roan 
gelding by Diablo, dam by Redwood; brown gelding 
by Diablo, dam by Redwood; brown gelding by Chas. 
Derby, dam by Correction; bay mare by Monroe S., 
dam by Langford. 

J. R. ALBERT SON. 

George G. 2:12* by Homeward, dam by Whippleton: 
Lucky Dillon by Sidney Dillon, dam by Bay Rose; 
bay gelding by Athadon, dam by Waterford; chest- 
nut gelding by Son of Electioneer; Alta Vista, black 
stallion by McKinney, dam Expressive 2:121; sorrel 
filly by Cbas. Derby, dam by Steinway; chestnut 
mare by Hart Boswell. 

OEOROE HLANCHARD. 

Lord Thomas, brown gelding by Steve Damon, dam 
thoroughbred. 

EDWARD MILLS. 

Searchlight 2:031, brown stallion by Darknight, 
dam Nora Mapes; Lecco 2:00] by Bonnie Boy, dam 
Lucy Homer; chestnut stallion bj Chas. Derby, dam 
by Memphis; Search Me by Searchlight, dam by 
Guide; chestnut mare by Gossiper, dam by Woolsey; 
bay <-olt by Waldstein. 

HARNEY SIMPSON. 

Arner, brown stallion by Chas. Derby, dam Bertha; 
bay colt by Don Derby, dam by Guide; Annie B. by 
Beau B., dam Sally Tricks; Roy by Welcome; chest- 
nut filly by Nutwood Wilkes, dam by Fairmont; 
chestnut mare by Secretary, dam Julia D.; brown 
filly by Welcome, dam by Hawthorne. 

A. L. CHARVO. 

Black filly by Capt. Jones, dam by Director; black 
gelding by Capt Jones, dam by Rockwood. 

J. D. SPRINGER. 

Billy Red by Glenelg, dam by Ingraham; Don Z. by 
Stam B., dam by Lottery; Argyle by Charles Derby, 
dam Flash; Bertha Wilkes by Nutwood Wilkes, 
dam by Forrest Clay. 

OEOROE RAMAGE. 

Florence Stone by Welcome, dam by Mambrioo 
Wilkes; Bert Arandale by Sidney Dillon, dam by 
Happy Russell; Clara Oakley by Sidney Dillon, dam 
by Happy Russell. 



WILLIAM BROWN. 

Bay gelding by Bay Bird, dam by Western; Morn- 
inglory by Woodnut; Midas by Kentucky Baron, dam 
May Girl. 

JOHN PENDER. 

Bay stallion by Mi-Kinney, dam by Inauguration : 
black colt by Capt. Jones, dam by Mount Vernon. 
H. H. DUNLAP. 

Harold D. by Dexter Prince, dam by Gossiper; King 
Cadenza by Steinway, dam Empress; Explosion by 
Steinway, dam Flash; Corslcana by Wihlnut, dam 
by Dexter Prince; Larkin W. by Boodle Jr., dam by 
Electioneer; two-year old by On Stanley, dam by 
Abbotsford. 

J. W. MILLER. 

Martha B. by Ashland Wilkes, dam Carrie B.; 
H. H. H. by Allerton, dam by Kgmont. 

JAMES SLACK. 

King Willis 2:161 by Bright Bell, dam by Prospect; 
Happy Jack 2:16J by Capitalist, dam by Bertrand. 

TED HAYES. 

Master Delmar by Delmarch, dam Lady Hill; Mar- 
boy by Delmarch, dam by Franklin; Chrlstabel by 
Charles Dei by, dam Algerdetta by Allandorf; Hay 
Leaf by Telephone, dam by Planet; Highland by 
Expresso, dam Sepha; Biddy by Re-Election, dam 
Irish Lady; Lucy May by Oakland Baron, dam Katie 
Clay; Sally Lunn by Wiggins, dam Bell de Baron. 

J. M. ALV1SO. 

Rey del Diablo 2:14J by Diablo, dam Rosita A; 
MajorCook by Chas. Derby, dam by Richards Elector. 

JOE COREY. 

Easter D. by Easterwood, dam Lottie Lee; Spin- 
naker by GafT Topsail, dam Easter D.; Donny Brook 
by Don L , dam by Echo. 

JAMES THOMPSON. 

John Caldwell by Strathway; Ehie by Mendocino, 
dam by Piedmont; brown filly by Nazote, dam Lucy- 
neer; brown colt by Monbells, dam by Nephew; black 
gelding by Altivo, dam by Advertiser; bay stallion by 
Silver Bow, dam Grace; Monica 2:lf> by McKinney, 
dam by Director; Chestnut filly by Teheran, dam by 
Nephew Jr.; Teheran by Mambrino Wilkes, dam by 
Nephew; Loo Loo, by imp. Lapidist. 

W. C TREFRY. 

Bain, chestnut gelding by Charles Derby, dam 
Empress by Flaxtail; bay geld'ng, pacer, by Diablo, 
dam May by Wildidle; Directory by Rey Direct, 
dam Mamie H.; black filly by Rey Direct, dam Birdie 
McClain. 

S. K. TREFRY. 

Tom Carneal by Diablo, dam by Cresco; black colt 
by McKinney, dam by Cresco; bay mare by Diablo, 
dam thoroughbred. 

A. W. BOCCHER. 

Miss Logan 2:06J by Gen. Logan, dam by Firetail; 
Harry Logan 2:12} by Harry Gear, dam Miss Logan; 
Bert Logan by Colbert, dam Miss Logan; Suomi by 
Zombro, dam Belle Medium; Dart by Hector, dam by 
by Killarney. 

AL MCDONALD. 

Forrest W.2:14', by Wayland W., dam Silver Shield ; 
Ilo Ilo 2:15 by Welcome, dam by Nutwood Wilkes; 
Rosie Woodburn 2:16 by Easter Wilkes, dam Lady 
Beth; Rey McGregor by Rey Direct, dam by Stein- 
way; Sutherland, brown gelding by Diablo, dam 
Missie Medium; yearling by McKinaey, dam by Dexter 
Prince; Peter Zombro by Zombro; bay filly by Zom- 
bro; two-year-old gelding by McKinney; bay mare by 
Sidney Dillon, dair Lottie Stanley. 

GEO. A. KELLY. 

Bonnie McK, three-year-old by McKinney, dam 
Bonsilene 2:14) ; Birdman, three-year-old by Antrim, 
dam by Jay Bird; Searchlight Jr. by Searchlight, 
dam by Sable Wilkes; black mare by Antrim, dam 
Nellie Blackwood. 

THOS. RONAN. 

Birdie by Jay Bird, dam by (ioorge Wilkes; roan 
colt by Antrim, dam Birdie; Antonelle by Antrim, 
dam by Meredith; bay filly by Antrim, dam by 
Meredith; Knott B-y by Arronmax; Midget by 
Meredith; Vantram by Antrim; bay mare by Arron- 
max; chestnut filly by Antrim; Darwina by Meredith; 
black gelding by Antrim. 

SUTHERLAND AND CHADMOURNE. 

Chestnut gelding by Strathway, dam by Geo. M. 
Patchen Jr.; brown gelding by Linmont; sorrel 
gelding by Chas. Derby, dam by Flaxtail; brown colt 
by Prince Direct, dam by Piedmont; weanling by 
Stam B., dam by Piedmont; sorrel colt (3) by Nut- 
wood Wilkes, dam Nellie W. by Woolsey ; eorrel colt 
(2) full brother to last named. 

JAMK.S MBRRYMAN. 

Queen Bessby Silverwood.dam by Nutwood Wilkes; 
black filly by ChaB. Marvin, dam by Mambrino Wilkes; 
Tessle, brown filly by Cossipcr, dam by Bay Rose; 
bay filly by Chas. Marvin, dam by Poscora Hay ward ; 
bay filly by Chas. Marvin, dam by Antovolo; bay- 
mare by Lottery Ticket, dam by McKinney; bay 
stallion Silver Moon by Silver Bow Jr., dam Leona 



by Almoon; Welcome Jr. by Welcome, dam by An- 
tevolo. 

IIKNRV SANDERS. 

Chestnut mare by Diablo, dam Winnie Wilkes by 
Mambrino Wilkes; Rey Vera by Rey Direct, dam by 
Anteeo; Anona by Chas. Derby, dam by Anteeo; 
Charlottine by Chas. Derby, dsm by Direct; Mamie 
Roy by Rey Direct, dam by Alexander's Bay Allen; 
chestnut filly by Diablo; Tuna 2:161 by las. Madison, 
dam Ituna by Steinway. 

CHAS L. GRIFFITHS. 

Bonnie Direct 2:05J by Direct, Oam Bon Bon by 
Simmons, and the following colts and fillies by that 
horse: Bonnie D., dam by Altamont; Hay colt, dam 
by Whips; black filly, dam by Lakeland Pilot; bay 
filly, dam by Steinway; bay filly, dam by McKinney; 
chestnut colt, dam by Simmons. 

II. R. WARD. 

Bay gelding by Antrim; bay gelding by James 
Madison, dam by Steinway; bay two-year-old by Alta- 
mont, dam by Sidney. 

M. HENRY. 

Black two-year-old by McKinney, dam by Director; 
th ree-year-old filly by Educator, dam Elcle by Silver 
Bow; bay three-year-old gelding by Gossiper, dam by 
Algona; bay two-year-old gelding by Gossiper, dam 
by Algona; bay three-year-ol 5 gelding by Headlight, 
son of Searchlight, dam by Decorator, son of Director; 
bay mare Elcie by Silver Bow, dam Addle S. by Stein- 
way; bay yearling colt by Educator, dam Thora by 
Albion; black mare by Educator, dam Puss by 
Naubuc. 

"FARMER" HUNCH. 

Louise Croner, gray mare by Wildnut, dam by 
Abbotsford; Hattie Croner, bay mare by Bay Bird, 
dam by Algona; J immieCorset, bay gelding, breeding 
not given; Marconi by Boodle 2:12j, dam Much Better 
2:07J; bay filly by Dictatus, dam by Electioneer; Alio 
Down, bay colt by Iran Alto 2:12}, dam Elsie Downs 
by Boodle; Dewey, brown gelding by Welcome 2:10J, 
dam by Lustra 2:22. 



PROGRAM FOR BREEDERS MEETING. 

$13,700 to be Hung Up for a Four Days' 
Race Meeting in August. 

The Board of Directors of the Pacific Coast Trot- 
ting Horse Breeders Association met at the office of 
Secretary Kelly, 36 Geary 6treet, on Tuesday of this 
week and arranged the following program for its 
race meeting to be held during the month of August 
this year. There is a total of $13,700 for the horses 
to win in the thirteen races provided. 

WEDNESDAY— FIRST DAY. 

No. 1— Green Class Trotting Stakes (horses without 
trotting records eligible) t 800 

No. 2 — Pacific Slope Stake, for pacers eligible 

to 2:20 class 1500 

No. 3—2:14 Class Trotting Stakes 700 

THURSDAY— SECOND DAY. 

No. 1— Two-year-old Pacing Division Futurity 

Stake No. 2, $6000, guaranteed 960 

No. 2— 2:18Class Trotting Stakes 600 

No. 3 -2:10 Class Pacing Stakes 800 

FRIDAY— THIRD DAY. 

No. 1 — Two-vear-old Trotting Division Futurity 

Stakes No. 2, $6000, guaranteed 1450 

No. 2— 2:25 Class Pacing Stakes 600 

No. 3 — Three-year old Pacing Division Futurity 

Stakes No. I, $6000. guaranteed 1300 

No .4— Race for Local Horses (Purse not fixed 1. 

SATURDAY— FOURTH DAY. 

No. 1— Three-year-old Trotting Division Futurity 

Stakes No. 1,86000, guaranteed 2300 

No. 2— California Stakes (for trotters eligible to 

the 2:24 class) 2000 

No. 3— 2:14 Class Pacing Stakes 700 

Entries to all of tho above stakes, except the 
Futurity Stakes, will close on Tuesday March 1st, 
with 2 pur cent to enter. Nominators being liable 
for an additional 1 per cent if not declared out by 
May 1st, and 1 per cent by J une 1 st and 1 per cent by 
July 1st. 

The Kennoy Manufacturing Company, 531 Valencia 
street, San Francisco, has a second-hand Toomey 
cart with wood wheels, extra heavy carriage tie, 
cushion, etc., that Is as good as now, having been 
used but little, which will be sold for $!»0, regular 
price $135. Harness, blankets, etc., goes with it. 
They also have a fine surrey for sale cheap and manu- 
facture sulky wheels and attachments to order. 
Pneumatic tires, solid cushions put on all kindsof 
vehicles. * 



Good for Galls and Sprains. 

Woyburn, Aasln., Canada. Oct .T), 100.1. 
Dr. H. J Kendall Co., Enoabur* Falla, Vt. 

GaotlemeD: — I encloao a stamp for which plcaao send me a 
copy o I jour "Treatlae on the Horse and Hla Dlseaaos." I Brd 
your Kendall's Spivln Curo la an excellent remedy for (Jail* and 
Hpralna, and always have a supply on hand. Your* truly. 

C. ROHINSON. 

For all kinds of weather there is no drink like 
Jackson's Napa Soda — plain or in a lemonade. 



6 



[January 16, 1904 




Notes and News. 



The program for the Breeders meeting is printed 
on another page. 

Ploasanton's program for the July meetlog will be 
out next week. 

Nutwood 2:18} la the leading sire of dams of new 
standard performers for 1903, eleven trotters and two 

pacers 

John H. Downey advertises that he is located at 
Alameda Race Track and will take horses to train for 
tract and road. 

Frank Doble, a brother to Budd and Charles, will 
train for Warren F Daniel of Franklin, N. H., the 
coming season. 

The Prince of Orange 2:06$, Mr. Billings' last pur- 
chase, has been shipped to Memphis and will be 
trained by Millard Sanders. 



Consuella S. 2:12* by Directum is showing all her 
old time speed at Fleasanton. One day last week the 
was permitted to step a half and did it in 1:04}. 

Dr. Book 2:10 by McKinney, has been bought by D. 
G. McDonald of Pittsburg, Pa., for matinee and road 
use. The doctor is a great horse in these classes as 
well as on the track, and is a hard proposition to 
beat. 

Lord Russell, 23 years old, sire of Kremlin 2:073, 
and full brother to Maud S. 2:08}, is owned by a 
prominent business man of Newark, Ohio. He does a 
good business in the stud and still looks strong and 
full of vital energy. 

The Sacramento Driving Club has set a date twice 
within the last four weeks on which to hold a matinee 
but bad weather has caused a postponementeach time. 
The third attempt will be made to-morrow at Agri- 
cultural Park in the capital city. 



It was announced in Pleasanton last week that 
Monroe Salisbury had leased the Merriwa Stock Farm 
(formerly the Valensin farm) and will keep the East 
View Farm horses that are not in actual training or 
are in need of turning out, at that place. 



Ed Parker, who broke and handled Rey Direct 2:10 
and his get so successfully, is now in the employ of 
Mr. J. B.Iverson of Salinas, and expects to take a 
string of seven trotters and pacers from the Iverson 
farm to Pleasanton about February 1st. 



Waldstein 2:22A, that still holds the champion five 
mile trotting stallion record, is now at Pleasanton, 
having been shipped there recently by Mr. M. J. 
Zahnerof Rohnerville, Eureka. Waldstein will prob- 
ably make the season of 1904 at Pleasanton. 

Kinney Lou 2:07}, will get his limit of mares before 
his season ends on May 1st. Budd Doble is getting 
letters from all parts of California in regard to his 
horse and several mares have already been booked. 
Kinney Lou will be at the San J ose track February 1st. 



Directors of the Napa Agricultural Society will 
meet the latter part of this month, when the propo- 
sition of holding a race meeting this year will be con- 
sidered. Secretary Bell writes that in his opinion 
the prospects for a meeting at Napa and a successful 
circuit in California are excellent. 



In the tables of "best on records," compiled annu- 
ally by statisticians, one notably prominent mile has 
never been given space. During C. W. Mark's owner- 
ship of Joe Patchen, he, a simon pure amateur, drove 
the famous campaigner and a sire a best-on-record- 
race heat against Chehalis over at Portland, Me., — 
2;01}. 

A firm of tanners and carriers suggests that as a 
rule farmers and horsedoalers are not aware of the 
fact that horsehides, whether taken off slaughtered 
horses or those which have died by disease or 
perished from other causes, have a value In the mar- 
ket. Fair sized horse hides free of cutholes and other 
blemishes are now bringing from $3 to $3 25 in the 
market 

One of the best lookers in the East View Farm 
string at Pleasanton is the stallion Direct View 2:14} 
by Direct, dam by Mansfield, son of Hambletonian 10. 
He jogged a mile in 2:25 the other day and stepped 
the last quarter In 35 seconds and last eighth in 16 
seconds. He is a square trotter and made his record 
last year. 

An arrangement has been reached between the 
Gentlemen's Driving Club and the Driving Park Co. 
of Cleveland, O , whereby the long homestretch of 
he famous Glenville course will be maintained all 
winter a glary sheet of ice and either bicycle sulkies 
or sleighs may be used on it for brushing. The jog- 
ging back to the head of the stretch will be done on 
the inner track. 

An eastern exchange says: Ed Bass may race the 
elegantly bred stallion Almaboul by Stamboul 2:07$ 
from old Alma Mater the dam of Alcantara, Alcyone 
and so . many others. His owner, A. N. Kingsley, 
Ashuelot, N. H., contemplates mating the great 
broodmare Rosemont by Piedmont, dam Beautiful 
Bells, to him after she foals. Rosemont was one of 
the choicest at Palo Alto, and to Mendocino to whom 
she is now in foal should produce a raM performer. 



Joseph Hubinger, of New Haven, Conn., has com- 
menced a suit for $30,000 damages to his string of 
trotters and pacers by the wreck near St. Louis last 
summer. It will be remembered that the Texas 
reinsman W. O. Foote, who was in charge of Mr. 
Hubinger's horses, was also severely injured in that 
accident. Mr. Foote will bring a separate action for 
damages. 

Broodmares are bringing good prices once more. 
Expressive 2:12$ sold for $1700 at the Old Glory sale 
in December last, and now the bay mare tjuoddy Girl 
2:16} has been sold by J. L. Tarlton of Lexington, 
Kentucky, to D. J. McDonald of Aurora, Illinois, for 
$1500. She is safe in foal to Larabie the Great and 
will be bred back to that horse before being shipped 
to her new owner. 

Geo. T. Beckers, owner of the great young stallion 
Zombro 2:11 by McKinney, came up from Los Angeles 
on a Hying trip this week ana gave this ollice a call. 
Mr. Beckers has about decided that he will take Zom- 
bro to Cleveland, Ohio, about May 1st this year, as 
he intends taking a few of his colts over to the Blue 
Ribbon sale to be held there that month. Zombro's 
season at Los Angeles will, therefore, end May 1st. 

Last week's Trotter and Pacer said: Monte Carlo 
and Nora McKinney are at Matt Dwyer's stable in 
charge of Johnny McQuaig. Mr. Ives is highly elated 
with Monte Carlo, and says he is one of the nicest 
road horses he ever saw or heard of. He was jogged 
on the snow last Sunday by his trainer, who says he 
is one of the finest snow horses that ever stepped on 
the path. Nora McKinney is good on the snow, but 
not as well put up for it as the fast California gelding. 



The Percheron is the farmers' horse and good stal- 
lions of this breed will be well patronized this year, 
by the farmers of California, as there is a big shorts 
age in the supply of draft horses and prices are high- 
Mr. J. A. Beall, of Laton, Fresno county, advertises 




six Percheron stallions for sale. Three are black 
and three dapple grays. Four are registered horses, 
the other two have fifteen-sixteenths of pure blood. 
Read the advertisement and correspond with Mr. 
Beall in regard to prices. 



Members of the Gentlemen's Riding and Driving 
Club of Denver, Col., held their annual parade Dec. 
19th to commemorate the fact that at that date the 
club had the largest membership of any club in the 
country. Over 130 vehicles of all sorts from a bike 
sulky to a break were in line. A feature of the pro- 
cession was the line of record horses, led by W. W. 
P. 2:05}. Carbonate 2:09 came next and then Silver 
Sign 2:10}, Daisy Field 2:08$ and others of that sort. 
A set of "moving pictures" was made of the proces- 
sion as it moved up Grant avenue, the intention being 
to use the films in advertising Denver in other cities. 



Al McDonald is handling a black gelding by Zom- 
bro 2:11 at Pleasanton that is one of the best gaited 
youngsters ever seen at the famous track. The 
gelding will be four-years-old this spring. He is out 
of a mare by Gen. Benton and is a full brother to 
Lord Kitchener 2:26. Peter Zombro, they call him, 
and although he worked a mile in 2:19} at Los Angeles 
last year as a three-year-old. he is expected to trot 
much faster than that this year. Peter Zombro does 
not wear a boot of any kind, is a free open gaited 
horse and should make a very fast trotter. He is 
owned by Mr. M. A. Murphy of this city. 



Another star performer of the season of 1903, Jsy 
McGregor 2:08, goes to a Gotham owner. C. L. Mc- 
Claia, a New York broker, has purchased of W. L.. 
Spears his half interest in Jay McGregor at the re- 
ported price of $12,500. Mr. McClain now owns the 
horse entire. It is said the horse will remain in Scott 
Hudson's hands at Lexington, and will be driven by 
the auburn haired reinsman in the Grand Circuit this 
year. 

Mr. W. H. Houghton of Marion, Ohio, President 
of the McMurray Sulky Company, is in California for 
a few weeks with his family on a pleasure jaunt. Mr. 
W. J. Kenney, of the Kenney Manufacturing Com- 
pany of this city, has been showing Mr Houghton 
around during his stay here, and they visited Pleas- 
anton one day this week. Mr. Houghton found that 
the McMurray sulky is deservedly popular with Cali- 
fornia trainers, and that the company has in Mr. 
Kenney an active and enterprising agent for this 
Coast. 

A recount of the winnings of the Keene stable of 
Thoroughbreds in this country and England shows a 
total of $117,000. Race horses were sold in Britain 
from this stable for $80,000. In this country horses 
in training and yearlings were sold at auction for 
$45,000 and $50,000 worth was sold from the Castlelon 
Stud in New York, making a grand total of $292,000 
as the gross return for 1903. Carrying the recount 
still farther the Morning Telegraph states that at 
Brookdale the Keenes have 32 yearlings worth $192,- 
000, at Castleton 50 yearlings worth $100,000 and in 
addition there are on *,he 'arm named 110 broodmares 
of the most fashionable blood and the stallions Com 
mando, Voter, Ben Brush, Kingston and Horoscope, 
togeth'er with the broad acres of Castleton, making 
the investment altogether about $1,000,000 on which 
a return of $292,000 is very large even if in gross. 

One of the handsomest three year-olds in California 
is Elden Bells by Monbells, dam Elden 2:19J, (dam 
of Eleata 2:08$) by Nephew, 
second dam Eleanor by Elec- 
tioneer, third dam Sallie 
- Gardner, thoroughbred mare 
by Vandal. Elden Bells is 
owned by Col. J. C. Kirk- 
patrick, manager of the 
Palace Hotel in this city, 
who has been driving him on 
the Park roads this winter, 
and finds him a most agree- 
able road horse. The accom- 
panying photograph, taken 
a few days since, is a good 
likeness of the colt and a 
pretty fair one of his owner. 
There is no more enthusiastic 
road driver than Col. Kirk- 
patrick, and about the only 
days he misses are when it is 
raining or the days he goes 
to Pleasanton, where he is 
now building a capacious 
bungalow close to the famous 
training track there. This 
bungalow is nearing com- 
pletion and when finished 
will be a model country resi- 
dence. Col. Kirkpatrick is a very active business 
man, managing with great success the immense 
Sharon Estate, besides being one of San Francisco's 
Harbor Commissioners and filling many other 
positions of trust. He is a director of the P. C. T. H. 
B. A. and a member of the Board of Appeals of the 
National Trotting Association. He finds his best 
relaxation from business in driving good harness 
horses, and as a reinsman behind a fast trotter has 
few superiors. 

Harry Fancher, of New York, is buying consider- 
able speed for the European market, and it seems the 
huskyheaded foreigners are now taking kindly to 
pacers. Last Saturday, Mr. Fancher shipped four- 
teen head to London to one man. These he had pur- 
chased on an order. They were mostly pacers with 
records ranging from 2:08$ to 2:23$, and the larger 
percentage were geldings. On Monday, January 4th, 
Mr. Fancher received a letter from Emanuel Peter- 
sen of Copenhagen, Denmark, requesting him to pur- 
chase a trotting stallion for the Danish Trotting Asso- 
ciation. Mr. Petersen's letter stated that he wished 
a horse 17 hands tall, black or brown in color, with 
no defects in body or limb, possessed with an even 
temper, must be standard bred, with a record of 2:30 
or better, and possessed with style and action of 
superior quality. Mr. Fancher will hardly be able to 
find a 17 hand trotting bred stallion, to fill his order. 
Perhaps some of our readers can help him with one. 



Lady Yeiser by Garrard Chief 2253 is one of the 
great brood mares of which little has been written in 
the turf journals. She is credited with eight stand- 
ard performers by the last Year Book and put two 
new ones in the list in 1903, giving her ten with stand- 
ard records. Of these six are trotters with records 
from 2:28$ to 2:29}, and four are pacers with records 
from 2:05} to 2:17}. Her son, Don Pizarro 2:14}, is 
the sire of sixteen in the list, of which six have rec- 
ords below 2:15, and her daughters have produced 
five. Garrard Chief, the sire of Lady Yeiser, was by 
Mambrino Chief. Her dam was Jewell by Vermont 
104, a grandson of Black Hawk 5. There are several 
crosses of running blood in Lady Yeiser's pedigree. 

There are 97 entries in the Occident Stake of 1906, 
entries for which closed January 2d. The list was 
received just before this issue of the Breeder and 
Sportsman went to press and too late for publica- 
tion. It will appear next week. 



Says Sports of the Times: "Almont Jr. is back again 
at Village Farm, after several years absence and in 
spite of his years looks virile. Almont Jr. will be 32 
years old next spring, but he looks 15 years younger. 
He is still vigorous, and Superintendent Bradburn 
has decided to mate with him next spring some of the 
beat of the youngbroodmares owned at Village Farm. 
Almont Jr. has sired more fast, handsome and perfect 
mannered road horses than any other stallion that 
ever stood in Western New York, and considering 
that when he was the premier sire at Village Farm 
the broodmares there were vastly inferior in breeding 
to those of the present day, his showing as a 6ire is 
little less than wonderful. He was displaced by Mam- 
brino King before he bad been given an opportunity 
to leave any sons out of real great mares, and it is to 
be hoped that from his services next spring some colts 
may come that will develop into horses of the individ- 
uality and breeding that will make them desirable 
horses to use in the stud and thus save from dying 
out a line of the Almont family that has some most 
valuable qualifications." 



January 16, 1*4 



PACIFIC BREEDERS FUTURITIES. 



Payments Made January ad on Stakes to be 
Decided This Year. 

There will be four contests at the meeting of the 
Pacific Coast TrottiDg Horse Breeders Association to 
be held this year, two of which will be for two year 
olds and two for three year olds entered in the 
Futurities. 

Of the 122 colts and fillies on which payments were 
made as two year olds January 2, 1903, ">4 had pay- 
ment made on them as three year olds January 2d 
this year. This means that fifty-four colts and fillies 
have been or will be put in training for the two 
divisions of the stake that are given to three year 
olds. The trotters get $2000, and the pacers $1000 to 
contest for. The nominator of the dam of the win- 
ner in either event will get $200, and the owner of the 
stallion that sires either winntr will be paid $100 out 
of the stake. It will not be possible to know just how 
the three year olds will be divided a9 to their gaits 
UQtil the starting payments for the race9 are mado 
ten days before the meeting opens. Of the 176 colts 
and fillies foals of 1902, on which payment was made 
as yearlings January 2, 1903, more than three-fourths, 
or 141 to give the exact number, had fourth payment 
made on them as two year olds January 2, 1W4, and 
are now eligible to the two year old divisions of that 
stake to be decided this year. The two year old 
trotters will compete for $1250, and the two year old 
pacers for 1760. As in the three year old events, the 
nominator of the dam of the winner of either race 
will be paid $200 out of the stake. The complete list 
of foals on which payments have been made and that 
are eligible to these two stakes are as follows: 

Stake No. 1, SSOOO, for Mares llred in KtOO. 

Fifth pay ments of $10 each were made January 2, 
1 ( .W4, by the following nominators on foals of mares 
bred in 1900: 

Book, C K, b c by McKinney, dam Leonor. 

Barstow, T W, b f True Heart by Nearest, dam 
Camma. 

Boone, Harvey, b f Bodie Girl by Stranger, dam 
Juna. 

Brown v\: Brandon, b c Longitude by Meridian, dam 
Media 

Borden, I L, be Cresco Wilkes by Nutwood Wilkes, 
dam AllieCre9co; b f Ella G by Hamb. Wilke9, dam 
Alice Bell. 

Brown, Alex, ch c by Prince Ansel, dam Nosegay. 
Coleman, W H, b f Geraldine by /.ombro, dam 
Gypsy Girl. 

Durfee, C A, bl c Almaden by Direct, dam RoseMc- 
Kinnev; b c Johnnie McKenzie by McKinney, dam 
Babe.' 

Durfee, W G, bl c by McKinney, dam Belle. 

Dudley, K D, br f Friskarina by Bayswater Wilkes, 
dam Bee; br c Eben Holden by Bayswater Wilkes, 
dam Babe. 

Farnum, Dr. CK.bc by Cupid, dam Bessie Hock. 

Gray, Jas H, br c Carahina by McKinney, dam 
Biscara; b c Calamaca by McK.nney, dam Hose Rus- 
sell. 

Greene, W C, b c Bulletneck by Zjmbro, dam Belle 
Kaymon. 

Hogoboom, El S, bo Red Hot by Dagan, dam by 
Waldstein. 

Humfreville, Mrs W B, ch c McKinley by Nutwood 
Wilkes, dam Nellie. 

Harris, Mrs B K, b c Gen DeLarey by Mambrino 
Chief Jr, dam Honor. 

Hoy, S H, b c Tee Hee by Bayswater Wilkes, dam 
Clara Belle. 

Haile, J W & Co, b f Suisun by Demonio, dam 
Hannah. 

Iverson, J B, ch f Thelma by Dictatus, dam Salinas 
Belle. 

Jones, C L, b c Cirlokin by McKinney, dam C«r- 
lotta Wilkes. 

Kelly, Geo A, b c Bonnie McK by McKinney, dam 
Boosaline. 

Klrkman, Geo W, gr f My Way by Stoneway, 
dam Ktbel Basler. 

Langan, G S, b or br c by McKinney, dam \nna. 

La Siesta Ranch, b f Wanda II by McKinney, dam 
Wanda 

Lawrence, H W, b c Murray M by Hamb Wilkes, 
dam Anna Belle. 

Magruder, (Jeo H, s c Harold H by Lymont, dam 
Mollie Mac. 

Myers, H C b c Spinnaker by (Jaff Topsail, dam 
Easter D. 

Morgan, Win, b f Eva by Zombro, dam Nellie K. 
Morgan, Geo J, b f Neerquoto by Neernut, dam 
Verona. 

Minturn, Jas W, b g Stratbcarma by Strathway, 
dam Carma. 

Montgomery, J E, b c Seymow by Diawood, dam 
Nancy H. 

Maatin, W, b c Marvin Wilkes by Don Marvin, dam 
Nora S. 

Meek, H W, b f Tabitha by McKinney, dam Fenella. 

Nutwood Stock Farm, ch f M M, by Nutwood 
Wilkes, dam Brown Eyes; b f K W by Klatawah, 
dam Queen C; ch f Miss Carter by T C, dam Blssie. 

Oakwood Park Stock Farm, b f Belladlrect by 
Direct, dam Bella II; b c Stlllwoll by Chas Derby, dam 
Bertha; b f Gregglns by Steinway, dam Maggie Mc- 
Gregor. 

Peterson, U G, b m Arbalita by Arthur W, dam 
Dinah. 

Rodman, A B, be Culprit by McKinney, dam Patty 
Washington. 

Rose Dale Stock Farm, b f by Saint Whips, dam 
Fila D. 

Sanders, Henry, br f Directrix by Rey Direct, dam 
An tear a. 



Schafer, Jacob, blk f Diroctrine by Direct, dam 
Donna. 

Shaw, L E, b c Lugo by Zolock, dam Daisy Mason. 
Smith, Thos, blk o Gen Frisbie by McKinney, dam 
Daisy S. 

Steele, C C, br c Algonawood by Black Jiwk, dam 
Bell R. 

Williams, J H, blk f Zenut by Neernut, dam Dulcet. 

Wills, W LeM, br f Bonnie Madelaine by Conifer, 
dam Bonnie Ela. 

Williams, C H, s c Collis H by Nutwood Wilkes, 
dam Net. 

Stake No 2. SIIOOO, for Mini Itrrd In 1 OO I . 

Fifth payments of $10 each wore made January 2, 
1904, by the following nominators on foals of marts 
bred in 1901: 

Arvedson, CA.bc Retttis by Sutter, dam Lady 
Phelps. 

Babcock, Graham E, b f by Athaneor, dam Lady 
Estel. 

Bohon, Jos H, ch c Bolock by Zolock, dam Boellen; 
b c Hylock by Zolock, dam Happy Belle. 

Barstow, T W, b f Just It by Nearest, dam Babe; 
sc The Victory by Nearest, dam Princess Alrlle. 

Bemmerly. Sam, b f by Diablo, dam Belle Button. 

Borden, 1 L, bl f Black Wings by Robert I, dam 
Allie Cresco; ch c Prince Robert by Robert 1, dam 
Alice Belle. 

Brierly, Sam, b f by Nushagak, dam Hattie W. 

Brown, Alex, b c by Nushagak, dam Pioche. 

Chiles, J F, br f Cbispa by Bayswater Wilkes, dam 
Little Martin. 

Comlsto, S, b f Alice C by Monterey, dam Hazel 

Cole, John A, b f Near Kinney by Neernut, dam 
Leonora McKinney. 

Christopher, L J, b f Direct Maid by Direcho, dam 
Ida Direct. 

Callendine, Mrs E W, ch f Lady Caretta by Nut- 
wood Wilkes, dam Abbie Woodnut. 

Cone, DS.bc by Kinney Lou, dam Kitty Marvin. 

Carter, Martin, be by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Ingar: 
b o by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Zeta Carter; b f by 
Nutwood Wilkes, dam Bessie C: b c by TC, dam 
Lew G. 

Crowley, T J, b c Pemberton by Boydello, dam 
Lottie Parks. 

Cuicello, J G, blk g by Rey Direct, dam Babe Marion. 

Curtis, W S, b f Fairy Belle by Zolock, dam Siren. 

Davies, Ben, b f Delilah by Zolock, dam Gipsy. 

Dudley, E D, b f Miss Valentine by Bayswater 
Wilke9, dam Bee; b f Ima Jones by Capt Jones, dam 
Babe. 

Durfee, C A, b c Covey by Mendocino, dam Rose 
McKinney; b c Galindo by McKinney, dam Elsie. 

Durfee, W G, br f by Coronado, dam Lola. 

l'.rlanger, Edward, b c by Strathway, dam Fly. 

Fallmann, F J, b c Sir Robert, by Nushagak, dam 
Hilda Bose. 

Farls Stock Farm, b f Monabella Benton by Mon- 
bells, dam Nellie Benton. 

Foley, P, b f Lady Montesol by Montesol, dam 
Lady Bird. 

Griffith, C L, by Bonnie Direct, dam Petrina; 

by Bonnie Direct, dam Alta Nola. 

Grove, Jas A, b c Baydon by Athandon, dam Bell. 

Gordon, Mrs Mary L, ch c Saint Cloud by Scott 
McKinney, dam by Antinous. 

Greene, W E, gc c by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Little 
Witch. 

Hashagen, Wm, b c Kinney Roso by McKinney, 
dam Golden Rose. 

Hennagin, George, b h Anti V by Alta Vela, dam 
Laura Z. 

Hoy, S H, s c Ben Hoy by Capt Jones, dam Camilla. 

Heald, E P, b c by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Princess 
Nona; b c by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Princess Mc- 
Kinnoy. 

Henry, M, b c John C Henry by Educator, dam 
Silver Bow. 

Haile, J W & Co, br c by Demonio, dam Corolla; b f 
by Demonio, dam May Norriss; b c by Demonio, dam 
by Nutwood Wilkes; b f l>y Demonio, dam Hannah. 

Harkey, W S, b f Dovilita by Diablo, dam Clara H. 

Herbert, Dr E F, b f Ferndale Princess by Neil W 7 , 
dam Ferndale Queen. 

Hogeboom, Robert, b c Waldstein McKinney by 
Wash McKinney, dam Yolo Belle. 

Iverson, J B, b c North Star by Nutwood Wilkes, 
dam Ivoneer; ch c Derby Chief by Chas Derby, dam 
Ruby. 

Johnson, J W, br c General Maiden by Falrose, 
dam Primrose. 

Jones, J A, b f Beliemont by Zombro, dam Daisy 
Q Hill. 

Kavanagh, Ed, ch c Statysail by (JafT Topsail, dam 
Dollcan. 

King, C E, b f Azolia by Diawood, dam Dolly G. 
Kingsbury, Geo W, b f Delia K by Silver Bow, dam 
El ma. 

Koefer. M C, blk c Rankinwater by Bayswater 
Wilkes, dam Bossio Rankin. 

Laugenour, Chas F, be Alexander Diablo by Diablo, 
dam Alexand ra B. 

Lasell, L M, I c Bill Bow by Silver Bow, dam Bello 
Caprice. 

Leet, Wm J, b f Still Better by Iran Alto, dam 
Much Better. 

Loorya Sol, ch f Annie Diawood by Diawood, dam 
Larly Marvin. 

Lumsden, W H, br f by Bonnio Direct, dam Myrtle: 
br f by Bonnie Direct, dam Koblet. 

McAleer, Owen, b f Beela Nowo by McKinney, dam 
Eva Wilkes. 

Markham, Andrew, b <• Sir Paul by Wash Mc- 
Kinney, dam Lady Bulger. 

Marshall, J W, b f Nlona Wilkes by Demonio, dam 
Trix 

Martin, Dr A H, b c Blennerhasset by Nushagak, 
dam BoyJella. 

Martin, S F, blk c Kenneth C by McKinney, dam 
Highland Maid. 

Merci r, E P. b f by Daedallon, dam Angelina. 

Masoero, Dr C, b f Tina by McKinney, dam La 
Moscovlta. 



«-uP rri8 ^ L A <\ br '» FanD y Bri 8X8 by Bayswater 
\\ likes, dam Algenie. 

Morgan, Wm, h or blk c Kaiser by Neernut, dam 
Grace McK; be Una Boy by Neernut, dam Una K; br c 
Signet by Newton Direct, dam Nellie K. 

Mosher, 1 C, b c Oosoola by Zombro, dam Alhalene; 
b f by Zombro, dam Scappoos. 

McLaughlin, Dr A, b c by Welcome, dam Alameda 
Maid. 

Mastin W, br t Ardis by Falrose, dam Nora S; b c 
Uncle Ben by Falrose, dam Mies Mtmney Filly. 

Meek, II W, b f by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Cricket; 
br c by Welcome, dam Edwina; br f by Welcome, dam 
Rosemary; b e by Wm Harold, dam Pansj ; b I bv 
Wm Harold, dam Directress. 

Mitchell, S U, b or blk f Bornelco P by Zombro, 
dam Jenuy WinBton. 

Mowry, Jos C, b f by McKinney, dam Eltctress 
Wilkes. 

Oakwocd Park Stock Farm, b c by Chas Debry, 
dam Bella II; f by Chas Derby, dam lone; c by Cbaa 
Derby, dam Chipper Simmons; f by Cbas Derby, dam 
Susie Mambrino; b f by Owyhee, Jam Economy; f by 
Owyhee, dam Uippa; f by Cbas Dei by, dam Bertha. 

1'owere, L O, be A pril Fool by Rex GtfTord, dam 
Hinda. 

Raschen, Fred, b f by Iran Alto, dam Bell Bird. 
Bea, Jas W, b f Miss Eva B. bv McKlnmey, dam 
Altilla. 

Rodman, A B, b c by Tube Rose, dam Advocatrix. 

Rankin, Wm B, b f McKinney Belle by McKinney, 
dam by Antinous. 

Reed, A L, br c Joe Reed by McKinney, dam 
Catinka. 

Rice, J D, b c RicewooJ by Diawood, dam Genevlve. 

Rose Dalo Stock Farm, b c by Wash. McKinney, 
dam Dalia; b c by Wash. McKinney, dam Darion. 

Runyon, Mrs Sol, b c Roy Runyon by Mendocino, 
dam Coressa; be Live Oak Runyon by Exioneer, dam 
Dextressjb f Ora Runyon by Azmoor, dam Allowood. 

Shippee, W A, s f by Temescal, dam Trusswood. 

Smltb, Thos, b f by McKinney, dam Daisy S. 

Solano, Alfred, b f Novia Mia by Sky Pointer Jr, 
dam Nashawena; blk f Vivandera by McKinney, dam 
Vi9ta. 

Smith, W W, b m Vimosa by Vinmont, dam Maggie. 

Stickle, G E, b f by Daedalion, dam Alaska Filly; b 
c by Silver Bow, dam Cornelia. 

Strong. N M, br c Ambush by Zolock, dam May 
Kinney. 

Thornquest, C O, b f by McKinney, dam Miss Pea- 
cock. 

Todhunter, L H, br 1 Zombelle by Zombro, dam 
Silver Bell; b f Zomitella by Zombro, dam Itella. 

Truesdell, Edward C, ch f Eliza Lincoln, by Zolock, 
dam Gift. 

Tuttle Bros, br c Advance by Suomi, dam Klickitat 
Maid. 

Tuttle, Dr Jay, b c Zadok by Zombro, dam MaiMe. 

Thompson, J W, ch f Miss Monbells by Monbells, 
dam Emaline. 

Valencia Stock Farm, br f La Belle Harriett by 
Derby Heir, dam by La Belle; b f by Direct Heir, dam 
Rosed rop. 

Vance, WL.bc Sir John S. by Diablo, dam Elisa S. 

Vanderhurbt, W, c Roberto by Robbin.dam Lilly V. 

Wadham, Fred W, bf Ielwin by Neernut, dam 
Johannah Treat. 

Warlow, Geo L, b f Sextette by Athablr, dam Don- 
natrine; b c Atha9ham by Athadon, dam Cora Wicker- 
sham; b f Strathalie by Strathway, dam Athalie. 

Wellington, B F Jr.b c Navarre by Nutwood Wilkes, 
dam Miss Leah. 

White, C F, blk f Marguerite W by Exioneer, dam 
Lillie Thorne. 

Wempe, G, — by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Belle W. 

Williams, C H, br c by McKinney, dam Twenty- 
Third. 

Williams, Mrs P J, b f Mary Nellson by MoDterey, 
dam Egyptian Maid. 

Wills, W LeMoyne, br c Hancock Johnston by 
Conifer, dam Bonnie Ela; s c Fremont by Conifer, 
dam Pastora. 

Wilson, A G, b c Little Medium by Dictatus Medium, 
dam Little One. 

Wilson, J K, b f by Sidney Dillon, dam Liliy Stanley. 

Young, John D, bre Glen Alto by Rex Gilford, dam 
Glennita. 



Horso Owners Should Vso 

GOMBAILT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

The Groat French Veterinary Remedy. 
A SAFB. SPEEDY A POSITIVE CURE. 

Prepare I picluftlrHy 
hr J. I Oomtttiilt, • \- 
WferlnarY Hnrfrenn to 
t he Kr*-ti« d < ,<>vf i ii men t 




SlPFRSI IHSMI ( \l I MO OH I IKING. 



arrtr or blrmi*h. 
!«<• I Take tin' 
action. 



«!,<•« Ii. 



II. 



or rattle 

til III M \ > IIMKDT foi ICh.n- 
mittlam, H|iraln«, Wore Throal, ■' . " 

I. Inclinable 

W I 1. 1 % ll % NTEE 
spoonful "i t uii.tif- Itnl.iim "iii 

ual re.ult* 1 1. nn a whole Imttle of any 

bolt la at Caaatlc llnl.iim Mid l« 

War i nnlnl to (five Ml I- rai 1 1 . >u Pi I. ■ a| .,-,0 

par bottle. BoM by •Iruirirl-K. -r -out by «• 
lire... ■ hai ir- ; |.n|.|. w ith full illrertlnn. for 1U 
in. Hen. I f.rr r|, -. ri|.tlw rlnnlatn, tcntlmo- 
nlalR, etc. AiMrets 

Til IIWRKICI-Wl' LUIS C0IPAKT, CliTilud, Ohio. 



Hi 




[January 16, 1604 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. »• WITT. 



Save the Birds. 



The Cooper Ornithological Club of California held 
its eleventh annual meeting January 9th at the resi- 
dence of the president, H. R. Taylor, 1375 Regent 
street, Alameda. There was a large attendance of 
students of ornithology from Stanford and Berkeley 
universities, Oakland, San Francisco and other points. 
The club is the most active State organization for the 
study of the habits of birds in the Union, and now 
has a membership of over two hundred, scattered 
throughout California, with some members in Ore- 
gon, Washington, Nevada and Utah. Much scientific 
research has been accomplished by members of the 
club, and important contributions to science are pub- 
lished in pamphlet form for circulation among 
museums and students of the country, as well as in 
the club magazine, the Condor, issued at Stanford 
University for the society by Walter K. Fisher, the 
editor, who is a son of Dr. A. K. Fisher of the United 
States Department of Agriculture. 

At the meeting M. P. Anderson gave a talk on "A 
Bird Island in Cook's Inlet, Alaska." Professor Otto 
Emerson of Haywards presented a valuable paper on 
the subject, "The Feet and Bills of Birds in Relation 
to Their Food Habits." 

Officers were elected to serve f<-r the ensuing year 
as follows: President, Henry Reed Taylor; first vice- 
president, R. B. Mi. ran of San Luis Obispo; second 
vice-president, Earl Mulliken of Berkeley; secretary, 
Charles S. Thompson of Stanford University; treas- 
urer, Joseph Grinnell, Pasadena. Walter K. Fisher 
was appointed editor of the club's official organ, the 
Condor. Following the business session the club 
members enjoyed a banquet. 

The value of birds as insect destroyers is gradually 
dawning on the general public and It is to be hoped 
that ere long the useful birds — and they comprise 95 
per cent of the feathered denizens of field and wood- 
land — will have the same protection that has been 
accorded game birds. 

Statistics gathered in every State of the Union 
show conclusively the wisdom of protecting the birds. 
Much has been published and argued against the 
birds for their destructiveness in the orchard and 
grain Geld. When the whole evidence gathered has 
been boiled down and weighed in the balance it has 
been clearly proven that in a large majority of in- 
stances the birds have a big allowance coming on the 
ci edit side of the ledger. 

The New York Department of Agriculture was 
recently informed that, in some sections of the state, 
people were killing wild birds because of damage done 
by them to early fruit. That is not only against the 
laws of the state, but against the best interejts of all 
who try to produce anything from the soil — "farmers, 
orchard ists, gardeners and all." Injurious insects 
are increasing very rapidly all over that state. The 
worst forms have been imported, and there is good 
reason to fear further introduction of these de- 
structive pests, as they are at our borders. The 
brown-tail and gypsy moths are liable to show up 
there at any time. The latter has cost Massachusetts 
over $1,000,000 so far to keep it under subjection. 
This suggests the desirability of using every possible 
means to check their depredations. 

Much has been said and written on the proper use 
of poison sprays; but the acreage now covered by the 
spray-pump is very small in comparison to the culti- 
vated acres of that state, and is confined almost wholly 
to a part of the commercial orchards and the potato 
fields; while the great acreage of farming lands lies 
exposed to the attacks of seriously injurious insects, 
working untold damage, unmolested, except by the 
natural enemies of the bugs and beetles and their 
larvae. 

Of animal life, insects outnumber, by far, all other 
species. Over 500,000 forms (Kingsley) are known, 
and the individuals of some of these species number 
many millions. Were it not for the natural checks 
on the wonderful reproductive power of insects, no 
living plant could mature, and utter desolation would 
result. To those most familiar with insects it is a 
daily wonder that they are not many times more de- 
structive than they are, and that their damage is so 
often local and not general. 

A conservative estimate of the loss to the farmers 
of the state of New York caused by insects would be 
10 per cent of their entire crops. Prof. Webster, the 
state entomologist of Ohio, places the loss in that 
state at 20 per cent. It has been recently stated that 
"up to June 1, 1900, 5,240,000 acres of winter wheat in 
the United States was abandoned and plowed, or cut 
for forage, as the result of the ravages of worms, bugs 
and Hies." Let estimates be what they may, the 
losses are large, and it is necessary to look for every 
possible remedy. 

Investigation of the food supply of birds has in 
recent years been carried on by the United States 
government and by many careful observers in several 
States, and yet the work is far from complete; but 
enough has been ascertained to prove that our wild 
birds are very Important factors in insect control. 

The food of all land birds consists of seeds, buds 
and animal matter, especially the latter, and most 
species of birds consume a large quantity of the larva; 
of insects, an enormous amount at time of feeding 
their young Many of the insectivorous birds have 
two broods a year, and both broodscome at tbeseason 
when insect larvm are most abundant. Many of the 
more injurious insects pass most of the year in the 
egg state, and some birds feed very largely on the 
eggs. 

Birds are intensely active. They are comparatively 



light, and have a marvelous muscular system, which 
must be sustained by an abundance of animal food. 
Some birds will consume in twenty-fourhours a quan- 
tity of food equal to their own weight, a fact not 
paralleled by any other warm blooded animal. They 
have strong and very active digestive organs, and the 
number of insects consumed and destroyed by them 
is very great. As a rule, birds are of delicate organi- 
zation, nervous and timid; they have numerous 
enemies, among which are other birds, reptiles, cats, 
the small boy and the "sportsman" (?). 

When there is abundant food, then there will be 
found creatures seeking that food, but with birds 
other matters than a food supply are to be considered. 
Special attention should be given to the protection of 
wild birds. Their nesting places must be kept quiet, 
trees should be reserved for their use, food should be 
given them in inclement weather, and destruction of 
birds and their nests should be stopped. 

The clearing of forests and the removal of under- 
growth, and especially the scarcity of evergreen trees, 
have taken away the favorite resting places of desir- 
able birds. They need the protection of dense trees 
for many weeks each summer, in which to build sheir 
nests, hatch their eggs and feed their helpless young, 
and always need them to escape pursuit. 

In the East firs, pines and spruces afford desirable 
nesting places for many species of beneficial birds, 
especially crow-black birds. Small bird-houses on 
poles, or even two-inch holes bored into barns or out- 
houses, back of which small boxes are placed, will 
supply a home for wrens and other species. 

Some of the most injurious insect pests, says a New 
York writer, we have are the spring caterpillars of 
the elm and willow, the tent caterpillars, gipsy moth, 
tussock moth, etc., and owing to their spines or hairs 
it would seem that they would not be very attractive 
food for birds; but recent investigation shows that 
great numbers are eaten by them. At times they will 
swallow an entire insect, and at others only a portion, 
but always a vital part. 

Recent reports on the food habits of birds show 
many Interesting facts. Even birds that have been 
condemned because they eat fruit or grain are known 
to feed most of the year on insects and noxious seeds, 
and if they lived wholly on fruit during the fruit sea- 
son (which they do not) they would be on the whole 
of value. 

The United States authorities at Washington have 
dissected nearly 15,000 birds and recorded the 
stomach contents, and others have done work along 
similar lines. 

The following notes have been made from various 
sources and may prove interesting: 

Forty-seven species of birds feed on hairy cater- 
pillars. Thirty-two species feed on tent caterpillars. 
Crows eat half a pound of insects per day. A pair of 
chipping sparrows had a nest containing three young; 
in one day they made two hundred visits to the nest, 
bringing food nearly every time. One-half the winter 
food of chicadees — black-capped titmouse — was in- 
sect, largely eggs, and the stomachs each contained 
300 to 450 eggs of canker worm. In Massachusetts 38 
species ot birds feed on gypsy moth. Blacibirds, 
during breeding season, live mostly on insects. 
Damage by crows is confined to a short corn season, 
but the remainder of the y«ar they consume enormous 
numbers of insects. Ninety-nine per cent of the 
stomach contents of thirty meadow larks was cater- 
pillars, grasshoppers and beetles, especially snapping 
beetles, so destructive in grasslands. Of two hundred 
species of birds listed in West Virginia, fifty-one feed 
mostly on insects. 

The following record will show the result of the ex- 
amination of the stomachs of a few Eastern birds: 

Forty-six black-billed cuckoos contained 906 cater- 
pillars, 44 beetles, 96 grasshoppers, 100 sawflies, 30 
stink-bugs, 15 spiders, etc. One stomach contained 
100 sawflies. One hundred and nine yellow-billed 
cuckoos contained 1865 caterpillars, 93 beetles, 242 
grasshoppers, 67 sawflies, 69 bugs, 6 flies and 80 
spiders One stomach contained 250 tent caterpillars, 
and another 217 fall webworms. Two-thirds to three- 
fourths of the food of downy and hairy woodpeckers 
consists of insects. Two flickers contained over 3000 
ants each. Of 281 stomachs of kingbirds, 14 only con- 
tained bees, and 90 per cent of their food was of 
insects. Of eighty stomachs examined, the phu-be 
showed that 93 per cent of their yearly food was 
insect. The bluejay eats many noxious insects, as 
also does the crow, and to save these birds for the 
good they do, it Is well to resort to considerable 
trouble to protect the orchard and the corn fields 
from their attacks without killing either of these 
birds. The bobolink, while a troublesome bird in the 
rice fields, had the merit of feeding mostly on insects 
during its nesting season in this State. Two hundred 
and thirty-eight stomachs of the meadow lark con- 
tained 73 per cent insects. Caterpillars formed 34 
percent of the food in 113 stomaobs of Baltimore 
orioles. 

The following birds are known to be valuable as 
insect destroyers, and it is hoped that careful obser- 
vation of their habits may be made, with a view of 
seeing the good done by them and of protecting them, 
so they can increase in numbers to combat the rapid 
spread of injurious insects: Bobolink, barn swallow, 
catbird, cuckoo, cedar bird, chickadee, chipping 
sparrow, finch, grosbeak, martin, meadow laik, night 
hawk, oriole, phu-be and all fly catchers, robin, quail, 
thrasher, tanager, vireos, warblers, woodpeckers, 
and all sap-suckers and wrens. Hawks, owls, blue- 
birds, kingbirds, crows, crow blackbirds and red 
wing blackbirds do far more good than harm. 



A Mix-Up With Lions. 

A most surprising story of an adventure with lions 
is that related by Game Ranger Wolhuter whilst in 
the service of the Transvaal Government. So ex- 
traordinary and unusual is the narrative that it is 
attested by a magistrate's certificate, for ordinarily it 
would be the subject to an incredulous reception. 
The tale is sensational to a degree and told in the 
words of Wolhuter himself, is as follows: 

"I was riding along a Kaffir path about an hour 
after sunset; it had been a long march, and I pushed 
on ahead of the boys in order to get to the kraal at 
Metzi Metz as soon as possible. My dog barked at 
something which I took to be reed bucks, but a 
moment later I saw a lion crouching close to me on 
the off side. I turned my horse sharply in the opposite 
direction, and this no doubt caused the lion to miss 
his spring, as, though the horse had some nasty claw 
marks on the quarters, the bound which he gave 
saved him. I was unseated, and simultaneously I 
saw another lion coming at me from the opposite 
direction; the horse rushed off with the first lion in 
pursuit, and the second, no doubt considering me the 
easier prey, picked me up almost before I touched the 
ground, and gripping me by the right shoulder in 
sucy a position that I was face up, with my legs and 
body dragging underneath his belly, proceeded to 
trot off down the path, uttering all the time a loud 
growling, purring noise. " 

•'The lion took me nearly two hundred yards, my 
spurs all the time catching in the ground until the 
leathers broke. Suddenly I bethought me of my 
sheath knife, which I carry on my belt behind my 
right hip; as the lion had hold of my right arm and 
shoulder, I had to reach behind with my left hand, a 
matter of some difficulty; but I at last succeeded, and 
I am sure no one ever gripped anything so tight as I 
did that knife after I had got it out. On reaching a 
large tree with overhanging roots the lion stopped, 
and I then stabbed him twice in the right side with 
my left hand, near where I judged the heart to be. 
I found afterwards that the first stab touched the 
bottom of the heart, and the second one slit it down 
for some distance. The lion immediately dropped me, 
and I again struck him in the throat with all my 
force, evidently severing some large artery or vein, 
as the blood poured over me. He jumped back, and 
stood two or three yards off facing me, and gi-owling. 
I scrambled to my feet, not knowing that I had mor- 
tally wounded him, but after a few moments heturned 
and went slowly away still growling; soon the growls 
turned to moans and then eeased, and I felt he was 
dead. Before this, however, I had got up the tree as 
fast as my injured arm and shoulder would allow me, 
and I was hardly securely seated when the other lion, 
which had returned from unsuccessfully chasing my 
horse, came back to the spot where I had been seized, 
and coursed along on my blood spoor to the foot of 
the tree. He had been pursued throughout by my 
dog, a large, rough and courageous animal, with 
whom I had often hunted lions previously; he, no 
doubt, was of assistance to the horse in his escape." 

"I now shouted to my dog, and set him on the lion; 
he came up barking furiously, and the lion retreated, 
but came back again and made a rush at the dog, 
who dodged him and continued to bark all around 
him, until presently the lion went off. After a time I 
heard the boys coming along the road, shouted to 
them, and they came up and rescued me from my 
position. The horse was found next morning not 
much injured, and the boys found and skinned the 
lion, an old male, with the canines worn flat at the 
points. He must have been hungry, as his stomach 
was absolutely empty." 

The certificate of authenticity states: — "Komatie 
Poort, Nov. 3, 1903. I hereby certify that the acci- 
dent described did occur to Game Ranger Wolhuter 
on August 26, 1903, in the Game Reserve, that Wol- 
huter killed the lion, that carried him off, with an 
ordinary sheath-knife, and that Wolhuter is still in 
Barberton Civil Hospital recovering from his injuries. 
Alfred E. Pease, Acting Resident Magistrate, Barber- 
ton District, Transvaal." 



"It was down in Texas several years ago that I 
came across the greatest dog I ever saw or heard of," 
remarked Phil B. Bekeart to a coterie of fellow 
sportsmen who were discussing the field trials one 
day this week. "The animal belonged to an army 
officer friend of mine, and was the greatest quail dog 
you ever saw. We have taken that dog out fre- 
quently and he would never go wrong, and would 
point quail in the most unlooked-for-places. One day 
as we were walking into town from the army post 
where my friend was stationed, a well-dressed 
stranger passed us. Immediately the dog stuck bis 
tail in the air and assumed the attitude recognized as 
'pointing. ' 

"It was some time before we were able to determine 
what he was pointing, but finally we decided that it 
was the stranger, which proved to be correct. We 
called to the man, and asked him if he had any quail 
about him, or if be had eaten any quail, explaining 
why we asked. He said be bad nothing of the kind 
and did not remember having eaten any for some, 
months. Turning to my friend, I said: 

" 'Your old dog has gone wrong.' 

"'Not a bit of it, ' he replied. 'That dog is right, 
and I'll bet you $10 he is.' 

"I did not see then how the bet was going to be 
settled, but took it up, anyway, and we continued on 
to town. We went to the biggest hotel in the place 
to get some refreshments, and there saw the strsrp er 
we had met on the road. My friend ssked the clerk 
who the stranger was, and the clerk pointed to the 
register. As soon as my friend saw the name he gave 
a shout and called me to come over tbete. 

"'Give me your money, my boy,' he exclaimed. 
'That dog knew what he was doing when he pointed 
that man.' 

"To satisfy myself I glanced at the register and saw 
the stranger's name. It was 'Robert F. Partridge! ' " 



January 10, 1904j 



@Thc $vsebtv mil* ^Huntsman 



Winners of Field Trials, 1903. 



IConoluded from Last Week.] 

VIRGINIA FIELD TRIAL ASSOCIATION — 
Chase City, Va., November 30. Messrs C B Whitford 
and B Tignor, judges; Chas R Cooke secretary. 2nd 
annual trials. 

Members' All-Age Stake, Hi starters (8 Pointers, 8 
English Setters). 

Winners— 1 Sam Jirgo(Plain Sam-.Iingoline,, white 
and liver Pointer dog; Dr Leigh Buckner, owner and 
handler. 2 Regina (Summer's Kent-Supenlus), 
liver and white Pointer bitch; R L Gill, owner and 
handler. 8 Bob's Tony (Tony Boy-Virginia Keel 
II), wbite, black and tan English Setter dog; E P 
Wilklns, owner and handler. 4 Sallle Klolocb 
l Kinloch-Emma Sargent , black, whito and tan Eng- 
lish Setter bitch; C B Cooke, owner and handler. 

Members Derby, 14 starters (7 English Setters and 

7 Pointers). 

Winners— 1 Jack (Captain Tony -Pink R), black 
and white English Setter dog; R A Croxton, owner 
and handler. 2 Blue Bonnet (Sport's Boy-Sallie 
Kinloch), black, white and tan English Setter bitch; 
C B Cooke, owner and handler. 3 Hanover 
Blythe (Jingo's Light-Bang's Pearl), white and liver 
Pointer bitch; R L Gill, owner and handler. 4 
Spotswood Bird (.Governor Spotswood-Cv's Daugh- 
ter), white and liver Poln'.er bitch; J R Purcell, 
owner and handler. 

INDIANA FIELD TRIAL CLUB— Clay City, Ind, 
December 1. Messrs W J Baughn and \V Nattakem- 
per, judges; C F Young, secretary. 2d annual trials. 

Members' Stake. Purse, sweepstakes, three 
moneys 50, '10 and 20 per cent. 4 starters (3 English 
Setters and 1 Pointer). 

Winners — 1 Fairland Lady Kingston-Mark's 
Ruby), white, black and tan English Setter bitch; G 
G Williamson owner, J II Johnson handler. 2 
Rap's Ranger (Rip Rap-Eldred Polly), white and 
liver Pointer dog; C A Paetzle owner, J H Johnson 
handler. Equal 3d Lady Hope (Count Greystone- 
Annette Jane), white and orange English Setter bitch; 
Charles Ehrbarownerand handler. Equal 3d Joe's 
Count (Joe Cumming-Lady's Belle), white, black and 
tan English Setter dog: G G Williamson owner, J H 
Johnson handler. 

Derby. Purse $200. $150 to first, $60 to second, $40 
to third. $5 forfeit and $5 to start: 25 nominations, 

8 starters (7 English Setters and 1 Pointer). 
Winners — 1 Trixie's Pearl (Sport's Gat h -Kingston *s 

Trixle), white, black and tan English Setter bitch; 
C D Stuart owner, Asher Cady handler. 2 Cuba 
Von Rip (Von Rip-Belle of Orange), white and black 
Pointer bitch: Jack J Duke owner, John T May field 
handler. 3 Duchess Greystone (Count Greystone 
-Duchess O'Neal), white and black English Setter 
bitch; Charles Ehrbar owner and handler. 

All-Age Stake. Purse $140. $70 to first, $42 to sec- 
ond, $28 to third. $5 forfeit and $10 to start: 15 nom- 
inations, 6 starters (4 English Settersand 2 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Count Greystone (Count Ladystone- 
Fairland Ruby), white, black and tan English Setter 
dog: C F Yung owner, Charles Ehrbar handler. 
2 Trixle(Jingo's Two Spot-Busy Bee), white and liver 
Pointer bitch; George I Nunn owner, John T Mayfield 
handler. 3 Sandy K (Koran K-Midnigbt Gipsey ), 
white and chestnut English Setter dog; C D Stuart 
owner, Asher Cady handler. 

CONTINENTAL FIELD TRIAL CLUB— Thomas- 
ville, N. C, December 7. Messrs. Wm R Tillman, R 
Huntington and A D Lewis, judges. John White, 
secretary. 

Dei by. Purse $500; 3250 to first, $150 to second, 
S100 to third: IU starters (16 English Setters, 3 
Pointers). 

Winners— 1 Oakley Hill's Pride (Oakley Hill- 
Gleam's Maid), white, black and tan English Setter 
dog; Mrs John Cowley owner, Er Shelley handler. 

2 Pioneer iCount Whitestone-Bonnie Doone , white 
and orange English Setter dog; Titus-Hoover Kennels 
owner, Er Shelley handler. 3 Geneva's Speed 
(Jack-Champion Geneva), white, black and tan 
English Setter bitch; P Lorillard owner, Wm. Tucker 
handler. 

All-Age Stake. Purse $500; $250 to first, $150 to 
second, $100 to third; forfeit $10 and $20 to start, 
30 nominations; 11 starters (9 English Setters, 2 
Pointer*). 

Winners— 1 Cowley's Rodfield's Pride (Rodfield- 
Sport's Belle), white and orange English Settordog; 
John Cowley owner, Er Shelley handler. 2 Jessie 
Rodfield's Count Gladstone (Lady's Count Gladstone- 
Jessie K >id field,) white and orange English Setter 
dog; Jessie Sherwood owner, Er Shelley handler. 

3 Lea, Ciocinnatus' Pride-Ruth T Etol), white, black 
and tan English Setter bitch; Dr J H Parker owner, 
Luke white handler. 

ALABAMA FIELD TRIAL CLUB — Huntsville, 
Ala., December 14. Messrs W B Madkins, W M 
Hundley and W B Hamilton, judges. 

Dsrby, Purse, entrance foes, 50, 25 and 15 per cent. 
Forfeit $3 and IS to start; 7 starters (5 Pointers, 2 
Setters). 

Winners— I Styx 'Jingo's Light-Nellie O.), white 
and liver Pointer dog: C F Eastman, owner and 
handler. 2 Gipsey Stone (Victor Okaw-Ruby 

Danstone), black white and tan English Setter bitch; 
D C White owner, W D Gilchrist handler. 4 
Ightfleld Don(Ightfield Shot-Alix Druid), white and 
liver Pointer dog; D J O'Connell owner, W J Allen 
handler. 

All-Age Stake, Purse, entrance faes, 50, 25 and 16 
percent. Forfeit $3 and 15 to start; B starters (5 
English Setters, 3 Pointers). 

Winners— 1 Rip (Young Rip Rap-Belle of Erin), 
white and liver Pointer dog; Johnson .V Cox, owners, 
B Brooks handler. 2 Tony Boy's Kate (Tony 

Band-Nellie Harris), white, black and tan English 
Setter bitch; H H Mayberry owner, W J Allen 
handler. 3 Rip's Lass (Youn^ Rip Rap-Jingo's 
Lass), black, white and ticked Pointer bitch; Garth, 
Keller & Rlson owners, W D Gilchrist handler. 

Free-for-All Stake Purse, entrance fees and $50 



contributed by members; 60, 30 and 10 percent, for- 
feit $5 and $10 to start; 7 starters (4 English Setters 
and 3 Pointers). 

Winners— 1 Tony Boy's Kate (Tony's Bend-Nellie 
Harris), black, white and tan English Setter bitch; 
H H Mayberry owner, W .1 Allen handler. 2 Hip's 
Lass ; Young Rip Rap-Jingo's Lass), black, whito and 
ticked Pointer bitch; Garth, Keller .v Rlson owners, 

W D Gilchrist handler. 3 Andy S ( ), 

liver and white Pointer dog; W W Cowdon, owner 
and handler. 

DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



Jack Bradshsw of Woodlawn Kennels will leave for 
the East next week on a business trip. During his 
visit in New York he will attend the W. K. ('. show. 
We know that his reception by the Knickerbocker 
talent will be a cordial one, for he Is not unknown to 
the doggy fellows who are "in the go." 



The Selwonk Kennels at Magnolia, Mass., and 
owned by Mr. L J. Knowles, and of which George S. 
Thomas is the manager at the reported salary of 
$5000 a year, will be broken up and all the dogB sold 
without reserve. The lot includes Ch. Ivel Doctor 
and Cb. Selwonk Floradora, two of the belt Bulldogs 
in this country. The list comprises some cracks in 
French Bulldogs, Bostons, Wirohairs, Welsh, Irish 
and M*nr hester Terriers. These dogs have won over 
BOO first and specials during the last year. This sale 
is one of the most notable kennel dispersals up to the 
present time. 

Wandee Kennels has lost the Fox Terrier Ch. True. 
The dog did not long survive his return from the 
East, he succombed to hemorrhages last week. Mr. 
Harley has just purchased the good stud dog Norfolk 
Trueman from N. H. Hickman. 



Alta Rachel, really one of the best St. Bernard 
bitches we have on the Coast, was found the other 
day in a Richmond district stable in almost a starv- 
ing condition. She was so weak she could not stand. 
She is now in the hands of Mr. W. W. Wallace and 
is getting along nice ly. It was a case of cruel neglect 
on the part of the person in whose charge the poor 
dog had been left. Le King, Mr. Wallace states, has 
put on 30 pounds weight since the December show 
and is in better shape than ever before. 



Mr. George Raper has not been long in replacing 
the famous wire-haired Fox Terrier, Raby Coast- 
guard, which he recently transferred to an American 
buyer in exchange for a big check. He has now pur- 
chased from Mr. Yeoman, Rambling Major, who won 
the championship at the Kennel Club Show at the 
Crystal Palace for the best wire-haired Fox Terrier 
dog in the show, and was also placed reserve to the 
curly-coated Retriever, Belle Vue Surprise, when in 
competition for the special for the best sporting dog 
of any breed, on which occasion Mr. Raper offered to 
give £150 for him. Mr. Yeoman, however, declined 
to part with the dog, as it was the first big winner 
that he had ever exhibited, and he sent him to the 
Fox Terrier Club Show at Cheltenham, where ho was 
again successful in winniDg two or three first prizes. 
Mr. Raper was, however, determined to complete the 
purchase, and eventually persuaded Mr. Yeoman to 
transfer the animal in exchange for something like a 
couple of hundred pounds, This was a big figure to 
give for a puppy not yet twelve months old, but he is 
undeniably well bred, as he is by the Duchess of New- 
castle's Commodore of Notts, and his dam, Rambling 
Fairy, is descended from the celebrated Tipton 
Slasher, one of the best wire-haired terriers tbatever 
lived.— English Shooting Times. 



Promises of the best show ever given in Portland 
were made at the annual meeting of the Portland 
Kennel Club held last month, officers and members 
alike joioing in a discussion of plans for the future. 
The newly elected directors are- a unit in declaring 
that they will do their utmost to see that the bench 
show is a credit to the clu-b and to the city. Work 
upon the coming show, which will be held in April, 
will commence at once including not only the gather- 
ing of cups to be offered as prizes, but for a large list 
of entries. 

It was an enthusiastic meeting that was held at 
which reports of the out-going officers were received 
and a number of applications voted upon. Officers 
for the ensuing year were elected as follows: J. A. 
Taylor, president; E. V. Willis, vice-president; T. E. 
Daniels, secretary; William Goldman, treasurer and 
Dr. J. Smith, F. H. Fleming and Frank F. Watkin, 
to compose the board of directors. Auditing com- 
mittee, F. H. Fleming, J. A. Taylor and W. M. Davis, 
chairman. 

Secretary W. W. Peaslee reported the club to be in 
a good financial condition, despite the fact that some 
$00 was lost in the last bench show. There is at 
present a membership of 225, as against 180 for last 
year, with cash on hand $689.33. 

Dr. A. E. Tucker, the retiring president, made an 
address. He called attention to the fact that three 
years ago, when the club gave its show, there were a 
large number of entries, while the number has since 
d windled chiefly because all the people could not gain 
prizes. In closing he said : 

"Last year's show, however, was the best show we- 
ever had, although we lost $!K), Instead of making a 
financial success. The dogs were better and the entry- 
list was not small. The prizes wore all that could 
have beon expected, and the show was the best bench 
show that has ever been held anywhere in tho North- 
west." 

In speaking of the proposed affiliation with the 
American Kennel Club, Dr. Tucker jtated that tho 
Portland Kennel Club was now an assured success 
as tho successful shows of the past had demonstrated 
beyond a doubt that it mattered not whether the 
club was a member of the American Kennel Club or 
the Pacific Kennel League. 



Pit Dogs. 

In both England and America fur ages dog fighting 
has been a popular sport, and the custom of breeding 
and matching dogs and fighting them In the pit, while 
contrary to law, is practiced In many cities through* 
out the United States. 

The first dog fight of importance in the United 
States occurred about 1*17, and u description of all 
the famous canine battles since then would fill a large 
sized volume indued. 

The fighting dog Is neither the Bulldog nor the Bull 
Terrier. He Is a "take down" of tho two. That is, 
tho Bull Terriers are bred from the f ull-blooded, bow- 
legged, heavy-faced English Bulldog and the thor- 
oughbred Foxhound, and the best come from the 
north of England. In tho breeding of these animals 
a high-spirited hound is selected, and, as she is se me- 
what of a fighter herself, her offsprings retain all of 
the father's and some of the mother's ferocity and 
vigorous nature and Inherit tho mother's brains. It 
Is claimed as a scientific fact that the real Bulldog has 
the smallest brain capacity known in the animal 
kingdom. 

The "pit dog," half hound and half Bulldog, pos- 
sesses intelligence (much required In the pit), strength 
and endurance in equal qualities but he has the weak- 
ness of his hound mother — that of "lotting go" when 
he should hang to his antagonist. 

To overcome this defect the Bull Terrier is again 
bred back to the Bulldog proper, and the combination 
thus obtained— two-thirds Bulldog and one-third 
hound— is termed the "pit Bull Terrlet." They are 
strong, willing fighters, and possess much science, 
frequently changing a bad for a good bold d uring the 
progress of a battle, when their full-blooded grand- 
father would hold to his death. 

The coloring Is varied — pure white, white and brin- 
die, solid tiger brindle, lemon and white, but never 
black or with black markings whatever. The weight 
averages from twenty-five to fifty pounds, and the 
best fighters known scale near thirty-five pounds in 
pit condition. 

These dogs are trained for the pit much in the 
same manner as are the prizefighters trained for the 
ring, or horses for the turf. They aredieted, rubbed, 
sweated (a dog sweats only from the mouth), walked, 
run on a treadmill, blanketed, etc. They are feu 
sparingly until they are brought almost to the weak- 
ening point, when their diet is changed gradually 
and tboy are built up In muscle with strictly first- 
class beefsteak, cooked rare, sponge cake soaked in 
wine, claret preferred, until the day before the fight, 
when they are "dried out. " This consists of keeping 
the dog free from food or drink for at least twelve 
hours, at the expiration of which time he is fed a 
little sponge cake and wine, and given a cup of cold 
tea to allay any fever which might be noted ss a re- 
sult of h> hard training. 

On the day of battle the dogs are placed in blankets 
and driven to the pit. Here they are washed in the 
presence of a selected referee. The washing also 
takes place where all bettors can satisfy the bim 1 \ . - 
that no pernicious drugs, such as carbolic, stryrl t inc 
or arsonic soap, has been placed on either animal. 
No dog will take hold of another where such soap has 
been rubbed. Soda is added to the water as a pre- 
ventative against such practices. 

The washing completed, the dogs are dried with 
clean approved towels, and are then ordered to their 
corners. They are generally muzzled until the words 
to "let go" or "loosen dogs" is given by tho referee. 

The pit Is generally made of rough boards three 
feet high, sixteen feet long by ten feet wide. The 
bottom Is usually covered with soft carpet. 

Through thecentro of the pit a linois drawn, which 
is termed the "scratch." 

The seconds then take up their positions In their 
respective corners. The referee (who by the way, is 
all powerful and must be a man of great determina- 
tion, good judgment and integrity), orders the dog 
handlers searched. This Is done further to preveit 
any trickery on the part of tho handlers, who are 
frequently well versed In "rubbing," "de pirg," e tr. 

All ceremony concluded, the dogs are ordi nil >•- 
leased. Up to this time the animals are kept with 
their tails toward each other, as, if they faced escn 
other their constant tugging and struggling would 
work harm to their "wind." When released they 
turn quickly, and with tails wagging, fly at each 
other, meeting on or close to the "scratch." Both 
take hold and the fight is on. 

Thero are various rules governing the alleged 
sport. Each Araer'can city has its own rule s and its 
canine representative by whom the local sports lay 
great store. 

The general fighting rules call for five minute 
rounds with three minutes Intermission for sponglrg, 
fanning, etc. If the fight be a finish affair, this is 
continued until one or the other dog refuses or is 
dead. After tho first scratch each dog must cross 
the line and attack his adversary in succession, ard 
the dog stopping on the way or refusing to leave bis 
corneT Is considered the loser. 

Dog fighting, whllo not as brutal as the unitiated 
might bo led to suppose, fre <| ue-ntly results in tie. 
death of one or both of the animals, but this rule 
does not hold good In all cases. Pilot, a Cincinnati 
canine, fought twenty-eight battles without killirg 
one of his doughty little enemies, and be finally died 
of old age. 

If the wag of a dog's tail ran l» e-el to 

pleasure, then nine tenths of the fighting dogs lovo 
the sport as much as do their maste rs. During tho 
progress of a battle both dogs frequently wag the i r 
tail throughout the contest and spring to the attsek 
with a cry resembling an exclamation of joy as much 



10 



[January 16, m>4 



as hate. They are entirely fearless and will attack a 
horse, cow or in fact any animal. 

The present champion fighting dog in this country 
is Bob, owned and bred by John Robinson of Fortuna, 
Ariz. He is fifty-two pounds, lemon and white, and 
has killed eight dogs, in his eight battles. 

3reeding and fighting dogs is not confined to the 
plebian classes alone. Men of high public, social and 
financial standing purchase, import, breed, maintain 
and employ experts to handle them, and large sums 
of money are put up on such contests by this class of 
sporting men. 

The American bred pit dog has proved himself to 
be far superior to the English product, and has in- 
variably won when matched against his Cockney co- 
scrapper. 

The foregoing article taken from a St. Paul ex- 
change is of some little interest, but in a few respects 
we believe the writer is a bit vague and Inaccurate to 
a certain extent. 

Fighting dogs have been bred in England for many 
years back— the Beagle and Bulldog cross is a 
standard cross. Much of the good fighting qualities, 
however, it is claimed, emanate from the white Eng- 
lish Terrier (a strong cross in the Bull Terrier), the 
latter breed is one that is noted for its pugnacious 
tenacity in a scrap. Bulldogs at one time were the 
fighting dog of the day. One of this breed has the 
faculty of holding on with a death grip once its jaws 
are fastened on an adversary. The Bull Terrier is 
the more active and full of resources, which prove 
that he can use his brain. A good fighting Bull 
Terrier will work his hold on another dog, shifting 
from place to place until he feels the other dog wince, 
then he goes into the vulnerable spot on leg, body, 
neck or belly and will cut in and worry his antagonist 
until the hold is broken or the under dog worried to 
death. Dogs have been killed in a pit that did not 
show any other evidence of damage than just the 
incisions of the teeth where the death hold had been 
taken. The Bull Terrier is dead game without a 
doubt. A dog a bit down faced has better punishing 
jaws than one with straight or pig jaws. Champion 
vVoodcote Wonder, who is a scrapper by the way, 
may be mentioned as a dog with a good punishing 
jaw formation. 

Taere are many styles of training dogs for battle, 
far too numerous for us to touch on here. We might 
mention two methods used for wind and speed. A 
revolving table upon which the dog is placed, har- 
nessed and securely fastened so that he can not get 
away from one spot. Nearby is a caged rat or a cat. 
The dog will mage an effort to get at the smaller 
animal. The more he scrambles, the faster does the 
table revolve, the dog meanwhile being held in 
practically one spot but going like the wind. Another 
method is where a sack is partially filled with straw 
and suspended two or three feet from the lloor. In 
the bag is placed a cat. The dog has a square muzzle 
on, the bag is given a hard enough bunt to make the 
cat yeowl and the dog is turned loose and literally 
makes a punching bag of poor Tabby in his futile but 
vigorous efforts to get fur. 

As a preliminary to a combat the handlers "taste" 
each other's dog. Should anything unsatisfactory 
be found by one or the other in tbe flavor of a dog's 
coat, then a demand is made that the suspected dog 
be washed. Tasting in itself was quite an art among 
old time handlers. The main dope these gentry used 
for a dog's hide was nothing but ordinary red pepper, 
but it was potent; for a dog when he got a mouthful 
of capsicum would invariably break away and sneeze 
—and then the jig was up for him. Dogs are some- 
times "tasted" after washing as an extra precaution. 

The searching of the handlers by the referee is a 
bit unnecessary, for what with keeping his dog ready 
in its corner for the call of time, and sponging and 
fanning between rounds, it would be a pretty clever 
juggler who could do very much at so busy a time and 
in plain sight of referee and speotators, and they in- 
terested to the extent of a few bets. 

The writer before referred to is somewhat mislead- 
ing in the location of the "scratch. " The dogs are 
"let go, " each from its respective corner and fly at 
each other. The initial place of meeting in the pit 
can be any wnere so long as they both get together. 
The first dog that turns his head away from his 
adversary is at "fault." They are then ordered to 
their corners by the "ref." The dog at fault has to 
"scratch." This line is a semi-circular mark drawn 
on the floor, or generally cut through the sawdust or 
tanbark with the ready toe of the handler's shoe, 
and is in each dog's corner not more than a foot or 
two from where the dog is held back by his handler. 
The dog to "scratch" must come over to his rival's 
corner and tackle him on the scratch line. After the 
first round the dogs scratch turn and turn about. If 
a dog falters, stops or turns, or does not get to the 
scratch line in two seconds he loses. Scratching is 
done to show a dog's sameness. The old timers would 
not breed to dogs that failed to scratch. Instances 
are known whereinjured dogs have crawled over from 
their own corner to scratch; dogs with broken legs 
have also gamely gone at their adversary. In a case 
of this kind bets have been made that an injured dog 
wouldn't "scratch" and which were won by the wise 
ones who knew their dog's mettle. Clever handlers 
have a number of resources to divert or technically 
stop an on coming dog. 

The prevailing rules for a fair scratch and turn 
fight are the Police Gazette rules. The intervals be- 
tween rounds are, we believe, one minute, time is 
counted from when the dogs are separated. 

A famous local dog pit in the early 'GOs was Con 
Mooney's Pony Express saloon on the corner of Com- 
mercial and Kearny streets. The champion dog of 
that day was his unbeaten Irish Mike, a dog who 
always had many pounds the best of a fight— you 
could take him or leave him alone. 

Tbe late John P. Dalton's Napoleon Jack was a 
famous canine gladiator a decade or so ago. His 
fight with the English dog Crib made history in 
"pit" annals. Jack s big fight took place in New 
« >rleans; it lasted two hours and forty minutes, and 



the largest purBe ever hung up at a dog fight went to 
Jack s backers. His adversary was killed in the pit. 

A memorable fight here at Canavan's Park was that 
between Napoleon Jack and Boston Ben, a dog 
brought out here by "S. A." Riley, a sporting cbar- 




A Fine l'latol Target— 96 Out of Possible 100. 

(Half Size.) 

acter of those days. Jack fought Ben to a standstill 
and Ben was not a bad goer by any means. The sur- 
prising feature of this contest was that the winner 
was over ten years old. He was an all white dog and 
a good fair specimen of the breed and could have won 
on the bench easily among the Bull Terrier classes 
that were shown a few years ago. 

Few, if any, fighting dogs ever showed the head 
and ring generalship of old Jack. He won most of 
his battles in short order and was never defeated. 
Generally he would work "like lightning" for ten 
minutes or so and at other times he would "jog" his 
adversary along until he saw the opening he wanted, 
then in he would go slap bang and it was all off with 
the other dog. He was also very clever in getting a 
grip and then holding the other dog away; he would let 
him do all the tugging and hauling until he was spent. 
Then when he had his dog winded, the finale came in 
jig time. One of his favorite tricks was an ear-butt 
hold. He had jaws powerful and holding as a vice 
and when he got a dog in that situation he could hold 
him off and worry his soul out and the hung up dog 
could not get at him to save his canine life. 

The white old warrior, we are sorry to say, passed 
his last days neglected and uncared for. Surely an 
unmerited reward for a dog who in his palmy days of 
a victorious career in the arena had the best of every- 
thing a dog needed and likewise — a strong following 
of sports who staid with him just so long as they 
made dollars out of his proweBS. He died in the stable 
of a Western Addition fire-engine house. His skin 
was afterward stuffed and mounted and is in the 
possession now of a resident of this city. 

The bench show Bull Terrier, so called, is a game 
animal from the ground up. It will be remembered, 
that Hink's Kit, was taken from the bench after win- 
ning at an English show brought to a pit and fought a 
winning fight. 

Dog fights are not without their brutal phases. 
Combats are inumerable where one or both dogs have 
been cruelly punished. 

There are many so-called fighting dogs in San 
Francisco and vicinity, but perhaps now none of real 
championship form. 

In the '60s and '70s dog fighting was a sport that 
had a strong following in this and nearby cities and 
many hot contests have been pulled off, generally at 
one or other of the well known roadhouses of those 
days. At present, while we now and then hear of a 
pit dog and a "turn up," the sport has been dis- 
couraged to so great an extent that these affairs are 
conducted with the greatest secrecy and in the 
presence of but a limited audience. 

The 'Coast field trials are on at Bakersfield this 
week. The winners of the Deiby are Stockdale 
Kennels' Pointers, Cuba's Glenwood and Cuba's Ivy- 
wood, first and second. Equal third, H. W. Keller's 
English Setter Sombra and W W. Van Arsdale'a 
Keepsake. The Derby was finished on Tuesday 
evening. The pur6e amounted to $645 (50, 80 and 
20. l) ), besides there were three handsome silver cups. 
The All-Age started Wednesday. Dry weather con- 
ditions prevailed early in the week, but there was a 
decided improvement later on. A full report of the 
trials will appear next week. 



A Fine Pistol Target. 

During the month of September revolver a D d pistol 
marksmen belonging to the United States Revolver 
Association shot for the association's cfcampk utt in 
and medal trophies, on recognized open air ranges 
As usual some of the best targets were made after 
the record targets had beer finlshed-always so 
elating (?) to a marksman. J 

One of the targets so made now stands as the 
record pistol target for the Chicago Sharpshoot- 
ers range, and was shot by E. L Harpham dur- 
tt^g n m . atc . h for the P' 8 ^ 1 championship of the 
• b - A < ln which match he scored 445 out of 
a possible 500. 

The target, shown herewith, reduced to half 
size, was shot immediately after the match, when 
the strain of trying to make the highest score was 
off. It was shot in the presence of W. T. Church 
and G. Springsguth, at 50 yards, 22-caliber single 
2 t? 1 w 01, Paine si e ht8 - 2 * pounds trigger pull, 
and U. M. C. long rifle cartridges. The score, as 
shown, is 96, 10 shots, 50 yards 

The only perfect targets we call to mind, made 
with a 22-caliber pistol at 50 yards, are those of 
Charles H. Taylor of the Harvard Pietol and Rifle 
Club, who scored 100 in 10 shots, 50 yards, in Phil- 
adelphia, 1901, and Thomas Anderton of Boston 
who, at the Walnut Hill Range, a year later, did 
the same thing. A 96 tareet is hard to beat. 
Who can do It? 

o 

The "ad" of Glen Tana Stock Farm Kennels on 
page 15 is of interest to Collie fanciers. Mr 
Griffiths writes that "Vesta whelped on January 
2d, nine puppies (4 dogs), all sables with white 
collars. Every litter she has she throws one or 
two prize 'vinners." 



Ihe English Fox Terrier Club is to be commended 
for two important resolutions in connection with the 
showing of dogs under judges who have recently sold 
a dog thus exhibited, and also concerning the tam- 
pering with dogs' coats. They are the following: 

1. "The committee of the Fox Terrier Club, al- 
though aware that there is no law against a judge 
judging a dog recently sold by him, or against an 
exhibitor showing a dog under a judge from whom 
he has recently purchased it, view this practice with 
very great disfavor, because, in their opinion, such a 
practice is against the best interests of dog shows and 
is calculated to lead (and, they understand, has led) 
to much abuse." 

The committee has further hinted that a continua- 
tion of the latter practice will leave no other course 
open to them but to apppoach the Kennel Club with 
a view to legislation on the subject. This difficulty 
must, however, always arise so long as judges sell 
dogs, unless a rule is passed by the Kennel Club that 
a dog must not be exhibited under tbe person from 
whom it has been purchased until six months after 
the sale. 

2. "In consequence of the practice of tampering 
with the coats of wire-haired Fox Terriers, by the 
use of sticky substances, the Fox Terrier Club com- 
mittee beg to call the attention of judges to this 
reprehensible practice, in the hope that they will call 
in the advice of the veterinary inspector in cases 
where there is ground for suspicion, with a view to 
lodging an objection." 

It is reported that the next show of the London 
Fox Terrier Club is to take place on April 19th and 
20th at the Crystal Palace, when Mr. J C. Tinne will 
judge the smooth variety, and Mr. R. Vicary the 
wire-haired. 

Steelhead fishing in the coast •treams is unusually 
good at present. A run of fish in Russian river has 
attracted the attendance of a large number of local 
anglers who are having a glorious outing now at 
Duncan's Mills Reports from Eel river, the Gual-. 
lala, from Scotts and Waddell creeks state that the 
game fish are much in evidence. The run this vear 
is a bit earlier than usual and the fish are nearly all 
large ones. Paper Mill creek tide waters are also full 
of steelheads. 

Salmon fishing on the Santa Cruz side of Monterey 
bay is excellent just now. A big run of fish, after the 
immense schools of sardines, started in last week. 
Boats have been taking from 15 to 40 fish daily — on 
spoonhooks. 

The San Antone seems to be inexhaustible, last 
week Al dimming caught 40 striped bass that weighed 
240 pounds all told. 

Duck shooting in this vicinity is of a patchy order. 
The bay is covered with thousands of canvasback and 
bluebilis, but they are very wary. Marsh shooting 
generally seems to be a bit on the wane. 



The suggestions made last week relative to a state 
circuit seem to have made a favorable impression. 
Santa Barbara is now in line for a ahow. Mr. R. 
Armstrong, a prominent fancier of that city, states 
that there is every possibility of holding a successful 
show in Santa Barbara. 

The San Francisco Kennel Club held a meeting last 
Monday evening. The Pacific Fox Terrier Club will 
meet next week. 

Duck a nd Quail Outfits. 

Tbe demand at Skinner's keeps up for sportsmen's outfits, 
ammunition and guns. A large and new stock of goods bas been 
added to fill tbe demand for bunting suits, rubber boon and 
hunters' footwear; oanras and folding wooden decoys, gun eases 
and a new design of leather-covered shell boxes. Peters Factory 
Loaded Shells are unequaled. Skinner's place Is 801 Market 
street. You oan get anything there yon need for duck or quail 
shooting. Send for a catalogue, If you haven't the time to come 
and try a mall order. , 



It is not often that sea lions appear in the rivers as 
far north as this county, states the tjutter County 
Farmer, but this season several have been seen in the 
upper river. One day last week Charles Ullrey and 
James Murphy, two hunters, heard what they 
thought was a dog barking in the tules on the Brown- 
ing land southwest of Sutter City, and on investigat- 
ing the disturbance found a huge sea lion stranded in 
the shallow water. When they approached him he 
showed fight and got around quite lively on his big 
flippers until they finally had tp shoot him. The lion 
was eight feet long and weighed over 500 pounds. His 
skin weighed 150 pounds and the fur was fine and 
glossy. He had come up the Sacramento river on a 
fishing excursion and wandered out into the tules. 
The water receding left him stranded and unable to 
get back. 

Strike! — if they don't give you Jackson's Napa 
Soda when you ask for it. 



January 16, 19C4] 



11 




Scene at Burlingame— San Mateo Hunt Club, 



THE FARM. 



Controlling Egg Fertility. 



Many are now thinking about filling 
their incubators with eggs and are won- 
dering' how and where to get anough fer- 
tile ones to do the business. 

If you raise your own it should not be a 
difficult job to have them fairly fertile. 

Do not force your hens all winter trying 
to make an egg record and then expect a 
lotof feftileeggs when the breeding season 
opens in the spring. Just keep your 
fowls healthy, do not feed them too much 
stimulating food nor get them too fat. 
If they lay a few eggs it will do no harm, 
but do not force them with green bor.e, 
mashes, etc., until you want eggs for 
hatching, then do not overdo the matter. 

I always have noticed that we get the 
most fertile eggs after the hens have 
been out on the ground for a week or 
two. If we want fertile eggs early w 
must follow these natural conditions as 
nearly as possible, supplying food that 
will take the place of bugs, worms, 
grass, etc. 

Some form of meat meal orgreen bone, 
also clover meal and cabbage or apples 
in addition to a variety of grains will do 
this. 

Feed a mash once a day. Fowls 
should not be compelled to grind all of 
their food, they do better and lay more 
and stronger eggs when part of it is 
done for them. 

I am sure two-year-old hens will give 
more fertile eggs than younger ones and 
their eggs will hatch stronger chickens. 

If you mate two vigorous cockerels to 
about twenty-five hens, keeping one shut 
by himself, and changing them every day 
or two it will assist in getting more fertile 
eggs, aa in this way all of the hens will 
mate to either one or the other of the 
males. 

In mating in this way, have cockerels 
brothers and as near alike as possible in 
size, shape, color, etc., for best results. 
Gather eggs promptly on cold days, never 
letting them get chilled, and do not keep 
them over ten days before incubating.— 
E. E. Lawrence. 

Oat meal or rolled oats can be fed to 
advantage to growing chicks, but we 
advise not feeding it too freely. 



Poultry Pointers. 

The point of using pure bred, healthy j 
and vigorous male birds cannot be too 
strongly impressed. 

Your laying houses should be well I 
built, dry and well ventilated, but see) 
that there are no drafts. 

In any man's orchard poultry always 
more than pay their way from the simple 
fact of their destroying curculia as well 
as other insects detrimental to all fruit 
treeB. 

The three great evils to the handling 
of poultry is bad ventilation of the 
buildings, fllthiness and over crowding 
of birds. 

In the fall and spring is the best time 
to make a start and do this with stock. 

With poultry it is best to go slowly 
and surely at first, and be careful to 
make the beginning with good stock, 
for a great deal depends upon this first 
starting in the business. 

If your chicks or ducklings are care- 
lessly handled in the first few weeks of 
their lives, they will never get over it. 

As to the best breed of poultry this 
depends in variably upon who is behind 
it. 

The more birds you havo in one build- 
ing the more attentton should be given 
them in the way of cleanliness. 

Do not neglect to chop some onions for 
your poultry, for they will eat them with 
a great relish. 



If Your Horse Gould Road 



IT WOULD PLEASE HIM 

TO SEE HIS NAME IN THE PAPER 
AT THIS TIME OF THE YEAR. 

Owners of good Mires are carefully considering the merits of the 
Stallions that are brought to their attention, and all have ideas in 
regard to what blood will nick best to produce the result they most 
desire, and they all want Colts from well-known Sires. 

Keep Your Horse Before the Public 

No Matter How Good He Is. 



McMURRAY 




PRINTER'S INK PAYS 

ADVERTISE HIM 

And Commence Early in the Season. 

We will Write Your Advertising Matter for You if you 
will give us the main points as to whore he will stand, the 
price and a description of him. Get His Card In the 
paperand his PicturewithaWrite up. It will do him good. 



Price Low. 

McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

Standard thti World ttrrr 

tr. AddreM for printed matter and price* 

W. J. Kenney, 

531 Valencia St., San FranoUro, Cal. 



STALLION SERVICE BOOKS, $1.00 
STALLION POSTERS 

STALLION FOLDERS 

STALLION CARDS 
PEDIGREES TABULATED, ETC., ETC. 

Breeder and Sportsman 

36 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



12 



[January 16, 1*4 



Smoking Pork. 

The big old fashioned smokehouse may 
be useful as a storing place (or plunder, 
but they are too large to smoke meat suc- 
cessfully unless one is willing to devote a 
good deal of time and fuel to the business, 
writes F. M. Wood in the Ohio Farnur, 
and when an old building ot this kind has 
a few loose boards or missing ones to give 
the smoke a chance to escape, getting the 
meat smoked seems like an endless job to 
the women and children who often have 
this work to do. 

Many farmers in this section of the 
country are constructing very small build- 
ings for this purpose, just large enough to 
hold the meat after it is hung, so the 
pieces will not touch. They are made as 
tight as possible. A little smoke goes a 
long way in a building of this kind. It is 
important that pork should be well 
smoked. The rich brown color that is 
given by thorough smoking gives the meat 
an attractive look. Then it tastes, keeps 
and sells better. Sometimes the farmer 
has a surplus of smoked side meat, and 
buyers prefer meat that is well smoked. 
We rind that an old heating stove that 
has outlived its usefulness comes handy to 
smoke meat. It is worth more for this 
purpose than the junk man would give us 
As to fuel there is nothing better to make 
a big volume of smoke than new, clean 
corncobs. When they show an inclination 
to blaze too much we dip a few of them in 
water. The wet cobs keep down the fire 
and furnish a lot of smoie. 

We like to smoke our meat early in the 
season in order to get it sacked and put 
away before the troublesome bugs and 
frisky flies make their appearance. We 
tie each piece tightly in paper flour sacks, 
and insects never bother. The paper 
sacks protect the meat better than the 
muslin sacks so often used for this pur- 
pose. We always purchase our flour in 
tiftyand eighty-five pound bags. When 
emptied we preserve them for this pur- 
pose. The fifty pound sacks are just the 
right size for large hams and shoulders, 
while the smaller pieces fit nicely in the 
smaller sized sacks. The sacks contain- 
ing meat should be hung in a dark, cool 
closet or room where the air will reach 
them on all sides, then they will keep 
perfectly during the hot summer months. 
If meat is piled up on a shelf, or in a box, 
or hung so the pieces touch, it is sure to 
mold badly in warm, rainy weather. 

There are many different and success- 
ful ways of putting away smoked meat for 
summer use. Some put the meat in a 
large box and fill in between the pieces 
and in all the crevices with wood ashes, 
bran or oats, with a thick layer of what- 
ever filling is used on top. With any of 
these methods care must be used to put 
enough of the filling between the pieces 
so they will not touch. A hot, stuffy 
room is a poor place in which to keep 
meat. There must be good ventilation 
where meat is stored. A good way to 
keep home cured dried beef is to pack it 
in dry salt. Meat that is properly cured 
smoked and carefully put away will keep 
until hog killing time rolls around again. 
We think those who complain of meats 
spoiling or becoming inhabited must be 
careless in their methods. 



The Life of a Farmer. 



The farmer Is a happy man— 

Sometimes. 
He lays a wealth of dollars up, 

And dimes. 
He has no cares to worry him 

Or fret 

His soul , because he never is 

In debt. 
When he is hungry all he has 

To do 

Is to go out and blithely dig 
A few 

Potatoes, or to pick some fresh 

Green peas. 
His life is full of simple joys 

Like these. 
He sees the sun rise nearly ev- 

Hy day. 
Oh, life to him is only sport 

And play! 
He doe* not have to think about 

His dress; 
He gets along with one good suit. 

Or lesa. 
He wife so seldom has to go 

In town 

She only needs to have one ging 

Ham gown. 
And he is nevor tortured with 

The blues, 
Because the children never need 

New shoes. 
Oh! life is just one round of joy 

And fun 
To farmers. How I wish that I 

Were one! 
I'd blithely lay the dollars up, 

And dimes, 
Just as the happy farmer does 

Sometimes. — Selected. 



Advice on Feeding. 



Professor Henry of the University of 
Wisconsin gives the following advice 
regarding grinding feed for stock : 
"The subject is a difficult one to dis- 
uss owing to the great variety of con- 
ditions existing as to both grain and 
animals. Directions are here given 
which may serve to guide the feeder in 
his practice. For horses which are out 
of the stable during the day and worked 
hard all grain, with the possible exception 
of oats, should be ground. For those at 
extremely hard work all grain should be 
ground and mixed with chaffed hay. For 
idle horses oats or corn should not be 
ground, nor need the hay or straw be 
chaffed. A cow yielding a large flow of 
milk should be regarded as a hard work- 
ng animal and her feed prepared ac 
cordingly. Fattening steers and pigs may 
be crowded more rapidly with meal than 
with whole grain, though there is more 
danger attendant upon its use. 

Sheep worth feeding can always grind 
their own grain. In general idle animals 
and those having ample time for mastica- 
tion, rumination and digestion do not 
need their grain or roughage prepared as 
carefully as do those with only limited 
time for these essential operations. Ex- 
periments quite generally show increased 
gains from grinding grain, but in many 
cases they are not sufficient to pay the 
cost of grinding." 



We have no serious objection to many 
of the harmless insects who ply their 
vocation, without serious inconvenience 
to any one. But there is a tribe which 
whet their lances and insist upon visiting 
us in the silent watches of the night and 
drawing from us our life blood. We have 
seen many remedies suggested to get rid 
of them. Here is another : Seven ounces 
turpentine, l 1 ., ounces camphor, 1 
ounces corrosive sublimate. Apply with 
a brush, every week for three weeks 
This rs said to be a sure cure. 

o 

Nearly every breeder needs to practice 
the economy of manufacturers in saving 
and planning and utilizing what used to 
go to waste. Modern methods, applied 
to almost any part of farm work, will 
render it profitable. 



Breeding for Bone. 

Export dealers in American draft 
horses insist on animals with good bone 
and blocky formation. The symmetry of 
a draft horse depends largely upon well 
distributed substance in all parts of the 
personality of the animal. The quality of 
inferior bone and substance is the natural 
inheritance of many of the draft horses 
bred in America, occasioned by the im- 
portation of sires of light bone formation. 
Dealers more ambitious to get rich 
quickly than to improve the quality of 
American horses brought over many in" 
ferior animals for breeding purposes. It 
takes several generations of methodical 
breeding to establish any family char- 
acteristic. The stallion with inferior 
bone, by crossing with mares of superior 
bone development, and then mating the 
progeny with sires of extra bone and sub- 
stance, might in a few generations of con- 
secutive breeding produce horses of the 
desired substance. The best breeders of 
Europe are particular to patronize stal- 
lions with strong bone and substantial 
personality. The strong bone of the Bel- 
gian, Shire and Clydesdale horses has 
been developed by methodical breeding 
and scientific rations during the period to 
maturity. The superlative quality of a 
breed can be largely nullified by injuri- 
ous feeding. From tne day the foal is 
dropped until maturity the ration should 
be adapted to building up j. grand super- 
structure. In nearly all of the pro- 
nounced horse-breeding States the lead 
ing ration is corn, a grain rich in fat pro- 
ducing qualities, but deficient in proper- 
ties that promote bone formation. With 
a medium bone as the natural inheritance 
of a foal, and reared principally on the 
ration of corn, the animal will develop 
into a cheap, light boned horse. Instead 
of corn the animal should, be fed liberal 
r ations of bran and oats that are rich in 
the elements stimulating bone formation. 
There is no reason why the American 
horse breeders can not equal or even excej 
their foreien competitors in horse breed 
ing, but to succeed they must follow the 
method of feeding adopted by the foreign 
breeders. Foreign bred horses are raised 
principally on nitrogenous foods, while 
the American bred horses are matured on 
feed deficient fn nitrogenous constituents 
The foreign bred horse is increasing in 
bone development, while in too many in 
stances the American horses are degen- 
erating. — Spirit of the West. 



Defertilization of Farms. 



offers an attractive sphere for acquiring 
wealth. It has been said that any fool 
can spend money, but wisdom is needed 
to make it, and the axiom applies with 
equal force to the man who skins the soil. 
Eastern farms are depreciated because 
they have been robbed of their chief 
value and the improvident element that 
did the pilfering has of necessity moved 
on." 



Raising Mules. 



than 

than 

time 
old) 



not 



sell 



and 



The New Way of Oiling Roads. 

A new method of oiling roads is being 
experimented with at the Huntington 
l'ark tract in South Pasadena, which is 
said to make a pavement as hard as 
asphalt and one that will wear longer. 
The plan is to mix the oil and earth and 
then tamp and press it. The first step in 
the process is to plow up the roadway and 
saturate it with water, which is followed 
by a thorough soaking with oil. Then a 
a 2800-pound roller is run over the road- 
way. There are long spikes on the sur- 
face of the roller, which serves the double 
purpose of packer and mixer. Then the 
road is treated again with water, oil and 
roller. After this a two ton roller is run 
over the road. By this time it is as solid 
as a rock. It is then surfaced and is 
ready for use. — Suisun Republican. 



The size and shape of the udder count 
for a good deal, but some milkers do not 
show much udder, while some very poor 
milkers have large, fleshy development of 
the mammalary glands. 



The soil is so rich on many California 
farms that there are many owners who 
seem to think their land is inexhaustible. 
They will find ere long, however, their 
mistake, unless they return to the 
soil some of the elements that have been, 
and are being taken from it year after 
year. The Chicago Stock World says on 
this subject : "An Iowa man went down j 
into New York State the other day and | 
bought a farm for $35 an acre. Originally 
it was fertile land, worth double what he 
paid, but generations of successive crop- 
ping had all but exhausted its fertility 
and rendered cultivation unprofitable. 
And there are thousands of such farms 
scattered all over the Eastern States seek- 
ing buyers The tenant system is one 
cause of this alarming sterility and as 
tenants flee from skinned farms the real 
estate goes on the bargain counter simul- 
taneously with his disappearance. This 
process has not been confined to the far 
Eastern States by any means. Indiana, 
Michigan and Ohio have suffered from it 
and Illinois is already infected. Wherever 
railroad tonnage shows a decrease in live 
stock the microbe of soil poverty is at 
work. It is this defertilization that ex- 
plains why the Eastern farm has de- 
preciated while Western lands have in- 
creased in value. Undoubtedly the 
greatest problem confronting the skilled 
agriculturist is the economical and profit- 

] able refertilization of denuded land. It twice the age of a horse? 



Twenty reasons why the farmer should 
raise mules," is the title of a folder pub- 
lished by a breeder of Kansas. It is worth 
reproducing and is as follows: 

1. They can be raised cheaper 
any other stock. 

2. Will go into market sooner 
horses. 

3. They are marketable at any 
from weaning time (four months 
until incapacitated by old age. 

4. Are less liable to contract disease 
than the horse. 

5. Pasture a number of colts through 
the grazing season and you will find 
plenty of blemishes at feeding time. 
Mules prove the contrary and have few 
if any blemishes, and their value is 
decreased by blemishes as a horse. 

6. They are easy to raise, easy to 
and hard to blemish. 

7. They instinctively avoid holes 
dangerous piaces. A team of runawav 
mules seem to run more for sport than 
fright, and usually stop before damage is 
done, while a horse never stops until he 
is completely freed. 

8. The mule is more steady when at 
work than the horse, less nervous and is 
not so liable to become exhausted, and 
trusty as to need no driver or lines. 

9. Can stand heat better than the 
horse, are steady and can be relied upon. 

10. Can stand more abuse and hard- 
ship than a horse, but will respond as 
quickly as the horse to good feed and kind 
treatment. 

11. The profit in mule-raising is their 
quick growth. Are marketable at three 
years old. A horse colt can not be sold to 
an advantage until five. So the expense 
of two years' feeding and handling is 
saved. 

12. No kind of horse flesh is more stable 
in price, excepting thoroughbreds or 
fancy specimens. Will bring more per 
pound upon theopen market or cost less 
to produce in the actual value of food con- 
sumed and time and labor required. 

13. There is always a steady demand 
for good mules. A buyer will always 
handle them. If there are plenty of 
mules raised in a section of a country 
there will be plenty of mule buyers. 
Mule buyers are not going wliere there 
are no mules to buy. In time of war in 
any country mules are always picked up 
at a high price and very highly prized. 
Why? Because they must haye them. 
They endure all kinds of hardships. 

14. Buyers make money by buying at 
weaning time, and by pasturing and feed- 
ing eighteen months have them ready for 
the market Can be raised and handled 
easily as a lot of cattle and sheep. 

15. One steer will eat as much as a 
team of mules. A good steer at three 
years old is worth $70 to $75. A team of 
mules at the same age (good ones) will 
sell from $250 to $300, having eaten no 
more feed. 

16. Feed the same amount to a bunch 
of mules that you do to your hogs and see 
which will make you the most money. 

17. A good cow fed to make butter, 
will consume as much or more feed than 
a team of mules from the time dropped 
until three years old. 

18. As for line animals, they can not 
be beaten, and are being used on the 
farms more extensive for this purpose. 
Also in our large cities are being used ex- 
clusively for draying and heavy street 
work, standing the wear of the hard 
streets twice as long as a horse. 

19. As they will not breed they were 
created for a special purpose, and that ia, 
as true, honest, durable and valuable 
workers, taking the place of a team of 
horses and lasting much longer. 

20. The reader will probably say : 
"Why not more mules raised?" Simply 
because in some localities there are no 
jacks to breed to. Good mules cannot be 
raised unless you breed to a good jack. If 
farmers could sell yearling horse colts at 
$80 each they would be willing to buy all 
the stallions in sight at $2000 to $3000 
each. Then why should they hesitate to 
buy jacks at $500 to $1000 each, when a 
jack has four times the service of a horse 
in his natural life, and lives to be almost 



January 16, 1904] 



13 



Beef and War. 



Alfalfa for Pigs. 



Wars are invariably productive of an 
increased demand for food supplies in the 
countries involved, consequently the prices 
of certain articles of foods, especially 
meats, rise in those nations from which 
the bulk of such supplies is obtained. It 
is therefore certain that the American beef 
trade wil. derive stimulation from the 
augmented request for beef which is sure 
to come in the event of an armed conflict 
between Russia and Japan. It has already 
been reported that the former country re- 
cently purchased a million pounds from 
an American pecking house for the com- 
missary department of its armv, and it 
was intimated by the Russian representa- 
tive at the lime of the purchase that his 
country would make larger drafts should 
it become involved in war. To what ex- 
tent the price of beef would be intluenced 
by the contingency in question no one 
may foretell, but a materially enlarged 
demand for American beef from whatever 
source will increase its price, and produc- 
ers would share in whatever financial 
benefit which might accrue to our meat- 
making industry as a result of war be- 
tween Russia and Japan. 

Meat is the conquering soldier's staff of 
life. It is the material which supplies 
him with energy and force, gives him the 
power of endurance and puts into his 
blood and fiber the elements that make 
armies brave, courageous and victorious. 
Meat-eaters rule the world both in peace 
and war. For this reason the country 
whose meat-making industry has assumed 
such large proportions as that of the 
United States seems not only secure from 
successful invasion, but is in position to 
profit bv wars between foreign powers. 
America is a large producer of meat and 
offers it for sale to the world to use as it 
may see fit-to feed soldiersor theapostles 
of peace. In the prosecution of Oriental 
wars the belligerent nations must seek 
food supplies in the Occident, and should 
Russia and Japan come to blows large 
quantities of American heef and other 
provender would undoubtedly find their 
way to those distant climes.— Breeders 
(fazctte. 

Geo. F. Thompson, of the bureau of 
animal industry, writes in the Farmers' 
Review: In building up a flock of Angoras 
from common goats, the males must not. 
be permitted to grow into bucks of breed- 
ing age; and even among the high grades 
there are comparatively few bucks to 
be retained as such for breeding purposes. 
They should be ca3trated early. The 
great majority of these wethers, espe- 
cially if they are of the first or second 
cross, do not produce sufficient mohair 
of good quality to warrant flock raisers in 
keeping them. These should be converted 
into meat as soon as large enough. Those 
wethers and does which produce a fair 
quality of mohair may be retained for 
that purpose for a few years and then 
killed for meat. They are not, however_ 
bo good for this purpose as the younger 
animals. There is a deep seated prejudice, 
as has already been stated, against the 
use of goats of any kind for meat. This is 
founded upon ignorance rather than ex- 
perience. The most ill-smelling billy of 
the worst possible type is by many made 
the standard of goat meat for the whole 
goat family. As far back as Abraham's 
day we read of goats being used for meat 
(very likely Angoras), and this, too, when 
there were many cattle and sheep. 
Certainly no prejudice existed against 
them at that time. 

o 

It is announced that a New England 
man has succeeded in making a sub- 
stitute for willow ware, tough and durable, 
which will supplant the German willow 
ware, of which we import millions of 
dollars worth annually. Whether this in- 
vention is a practical one or not, there is 
no reason why American farmers cannot 
raise all the willow rods which this 
country can consume in the way of baskets 
and willow work. Thousands of farms 
contain willow supplies or little streams 
which furnish excellent opportunities for 
willow growing, and which are of little 
use otherwise. 



Pigs complete their growth in much loss 
time than either calves or colts Alfalfa 
alone will not furnish enough mineral 
matter to secure the greatest development 
of bone in pigs. In addition to alfalfa 
growing pigs should be fed nil the corncob 
charcoal they will eat. as this supplies the 
needed mineral matter. In a test made 
by the writer pigs were forced to the limit 
of feed and weighed daily, and it was 
found that the gains were proportionate 
to the amount of corncob charcoal eaten. 

With growing animals other than pigs 
we have not found it necessary to supply 
more mineral matter than that furnished 
by alfalfa. 

The stockman can develop cheaply bone 
in his pigs, calves and colts with alfalfa 
in summer and alfalfa hay in winter. He 
can safely and profitably feed his breeding 
females— mares, cows and sows — alfalfa 
hay every day in the year and thereby 
secure well developed l>one in the young 
at birth. I'nder favorable conditions hi- 
cows and calves can be pastured on alfalfa. 



Sales at Fairs. 



Sales at fairs have long been a feature 
of the English cattle shows. In fact, they 
have become 60 general that many of the 
English shows are really market days and 
are held at frequent intervals. Sales have 
played a more or less important part with 
Americin exhibitors, but have always 
been made privately, and fair officials 
have taken little or no interest in en- 
couraging them. There would seem to 
be an opportunity in this country for ad- 
vancement in this direction. If sale 
classes are arranged for and a certain part 
of the day set aside for auction sales of 
cattle or other produce both the fair 
management, exhibitors and general pub- 
lic might be benefited thereby. It would 
help the farmer out at the spot where he 
is weakest— that is, in marketing what he 
grows. — American Agriculturist. 



Not a Bad Story. 

The Texas Stock Journal says that an 
Iowa farmer had a cow killed by a train 
on a railroad. He presented his claims 
to the company in a note, in vrhich he 
said, "Thirty dollars will be considered 
sufficient, as the animal killed was but a 
common cow and by no means the best of 
my herd." The claim agent of the road 
answered the letter promptly and inclosed 
a check for $100. He wrote the farmer. 
"It is the first instance since my con- 
nection with the road Miat any other than 
a full blooded animal of great value has 
been killed by our trains, and I inclose 
1 100 as damages and a reward for your 
honesty, and I would humbly ask for 
your photograph to be framed and placed 
in my office. " 

Jackson's Napa Soda Is sold in every 
cltv. town srd hamlet in the State. 



Grind Grain for Hogs. 

In feeding dry whole wheat there is 
much waste because much of the grain is 
swallowed whole. Any small grain used 
for feeding hogs should be coarsely 
ground, for underground grain is totally 
indigestible, for the outer skin that pro 
tects the digestible portion of the grain is 
unaffected by the digestive juices of ani- 
mals, and, having no gizzard and grit 
whereby to do the grinding themselves, 
it is not digested, but wasted. — Farm and 
Hanch. 



Worth $100 A Bottle. 




rolllnsTtiio. Trtu, Feb. 10, IW3. 
Dr. fl. J. KtnrUM Oow. Bftotfcani K»n>. vt. 

(tontlernen ; -I rwadsyour *>\ » <ri t-«rifnt tho other day 
In rcRanl to K -•.■:»., ■ ■ . - ( , ■ » ■. I . < i ■ ..• t - ■ n ■ <■ 
tnd Taiu*tle linn**** which had t- < n litmr- with S(<a*ln 
for nlna montbs, | nrnt Co the dnifnrlRt at Wratur f >r a 
bottle of flpaTln ( , iirt\ whl^h In all wwkg rpm"»H all 
lamonmH and PorenfM. arid a Hpllnt from another nne, 
and all thrt>«* hornrii are pound a* '-olU. The one belli* 
was worth SI OO to me. You may QN my name at any 
time you wlab. Very truly your*, 

I', fl. BKOI.F.K. 
Price •!{ six for tS. A* * liniment for family BM It 
ha* n" equal. Ask your dnnrirNt for K*n«J*M'* spavin 
Cor*, a No "A Treatl** on the Hons," the book free, or 
add re* « 

DR. B. I. KENDALL CO., EN0SBURQ FALLS. VT. 



PERCHERON STALLIONS FOR SALE. 

'pWOSIX YEARS OLD, TWO THREE YEARS 
old and two two years old Three blacks and 
three grays. Four ot them registered. Full ped- 
igrees given. Apply to J. A. HI. A I.I, 

Laton, Fresno Co, Cal. 

FOR SALE OR LEASE. 

TIIK HANDSOME HAY STALLION, I>ON 
1 FALI.Is (trial 2:lrt): weighs IJ.M1 stands Irt'i 
hands. Don Fallts Is by Fallls. he by Electioneer, 
dim by Rayswater. grandam by Lancet by lllark 
hawk Don Fallls sires size, quality and speed. 
Address MRS. LILLIAN (JRAAFF, 

( iuernovllle, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 
THOROUGHBRED YEARLING COLTS 

ByJDI'CAT, out of Sttvmghrrd Mare. 

....ALSO.... 

TROTTING BRED 

YOUNG STALLIONS AND FILLIES 

TROTTERS AND PACER8. 

-THE SIRES OFTHESE COLTS ARE DIAULO. 

Nutwoou Wilkes. Monbells, Cupid and Sidney 
Dillon. The sires of their first, second and third 
dams are Guy Wilkes, Hock Wilkes, Director, 
Harold, Electioneer, Cornelius. Haul's Abdallah, 
Venture, Lodi and St. Clair. All ol these sires 
trace In the male line to Hambletonian lOth.ough 
his best producing male descendants, excepting 
the thoroughbreds Venture and Lodi and the 
pacer St. Clair. 

C. E. FARNUM, M. D. 
.105 Parrott Building. 



FOR SALE. 

Three Standard-Bred Trotting Stallions 

WILKES STOCK. 

One Seal Brown, 16 hands, fraled May 2, 1898; 
first dam Fearless by Fallls 4781 (record 2:83): 
seoond dam Jean Peraull by Signal 3327 

One Goldea Bay, 16.1 hands, foaled March 5, 189»; 
first dam Signal by Del Sur 1098 (record 2:21), 
dam of Guy Line 2:29J£; second dam Lady Slg 
nal by Signal 3327. 

One Brown, white points, 16.1 hands, foaled April 
1899: full brother to the bay. 
These colts are all sired by Prince Alrlee 880l">, 

son of Guy Wilkes 8807 (record 8:15W), and bred by 

Wm. Corbltt, Ban Mateo, Cal. They are pure 

galted and show wonderful speed for the little 

work they have done. 
For further particulars apply to 

P. H. MoEVOY, Menlo Park, Cal. 



M 



FOR SALE. 

Y ENTIRE STOCK OF ST ANDARD-HRE1) 
Trotting and Pacing Horses Single drivers 
and double teams. Some excellent prospects for 
slake winners entered In the Ocoidont, Stanford 
and Breeders Futurity stakes. The great brood 
mare Daisy S. (dam of Tom Smith 2:1.114'. General 
Vallejo 2:20H, Sweet Rose 8:26 (trial 2:21) and 
Little Mac (3) 2:87). The driving horses and colts 
can be seen at my stable In Vallejo, and the 
broodmares, etc . at the race track. Apply to or 
address THOMAS SMITH, Vallejo. Cal. 

PRACTICAL POULTRYMAN 

^•ANTS SITUATION IN CALIFORNIA 
Lifetime experience on America's largest 
poultry farms; highest references; age 38; mar- 
ried. Address POULTRYMAN, Look Box 6, 
Rose Hill. New York. 

JOHN H. DOWNEY 
Practical Horse Trainer 

AI.AMKDA KAI K I U \< K. AI.AMKI) X. 
Will take horses to break or train for road or 
track. Best of references Has had twenty five 
rear.' experience Four years with Dullols Bros , 
Colorado. One year at Palo Alto Farm Apply 
to or address JOHN II. DOW N EY. A lamed a Race 
Track, Alameda, California 



Tuttle s Elixir 




is know n on every 
tn'ck, it) every train- 
ing stable and in 
every first class 
breeding establish 
nient in the OOuah J 

as being the iH'-t .Hid 

only really reliable 



Body Wash 



for horse' 



It removes all BtifTneM and 

1 rm U .%■• I, 



Tuttlr's Family Elixir 

We ,en<l a tample free for 6> in aUmi*, merely tu pmy 

Man. 

Sere! at nnr e f.-r nur 100- page l«».k, ' \ etertmr) hi- 
perleme." »hkh we mall Iree. 

Tultlc'ai:iiiirCo..4J70'FirrcllSt.,SanFrincis<« lU. 

Rewaeenfto-calletl till, In »««efre» mr kal Tall rV 



all HMerv they offer only le 



ellef. If 1 



RACI NG 




OAKLAND TRACK 

New California Jockey CI 

RACING 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 



RAIN OR SHINE. 

SIX OR MORE RACES DAILY 

RACES START AT 2:IS P. M. SHARP. 

For special trains stopping at the track take 
S. P. Ferry, foot of Market street, at l», 12:30, I, 
1:30 or 2 o'clock. 

No smoking in last two cars, wblcb are reserved 
for ladies and their escorts. 

Returning, trains leave track at 4:10 and 4:15 
and Immediately after tbe last race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



TALES OF THE TURF 

718 Pages of Horse. 

Two Volumes of 

FACTS - FICTION - FUN 

Vol I.— ""Alios. Contains i7 stories written 
by William II FaSXO, and a Memoir. 214 
pages. Clotb. 

Vol. 2 WET SUNDAY!, provides samples of 
racing from the (Irand Circuit to tho bushes, 
a peep atthe gallopers and ijuartor horses, and 
the horse trader. Illustrated by Whitney 404 
pages. Cloth. 
Price of each volume, •>.0O, or the two In one 

order, S3 so, all charges prepaid. Address 

Breeder and Sportsman, 

86 fieary St , SAN FKANCISCO, Oal. 



SITUATION WANTED— By a thoroughly eom 
' potent and reliable trainer and developer of 
speed, who Is thorough master of bis profession; 
best of Coast and Eastern references. Address 
TRAINER, 1531 E street, Sacramento, Cal. 

J. W. Zibbell's Training Stables 

Corner Point I Road and 2Pth Avenue 

San Francisco. 

HORSES TRAINED FOR TRACK OR ROAD 
and satisfaction guaranteed Terms reason- 
able Horses bought and sold. 'Phono Pino 1786 




ABSORBINE 

removes any soft 
bunch from 

Animal or Mankind 

without causing any inconvenience or 
stopping work. Allays inflammation 
quickly. Everybody should have I P.nnph- 

Ict on "Absorblno" whit b li mailed free, 
write for it now. C.et the remedy at the 
Store, or delivered Eoi $2.00 pet battle. 

W. F. YOUNC, P. D. F., 

SPRINOllK.il>, ■ • MASS. 

Also manufact'r of "Taroleum" for Horses Feet. 

For sale bv Mack&Co.. I.nnsley'.V Michaels Co , 
Redlngton A Co.. J. O'Ksne, and J. A McKerron, 
all of San Francisco. 



Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK lEVY 
tapcrl Cutlet 
and filUf ... 
fine Suit, 
Irom 

MS.U0 up 



Onl, Ihe 

Be: ticip 

hn ployed... 
All v.ork 
don« on Ihe 
prcmixi 



toGeiry St.. > F Koofm 19 20 Phone Grant 158 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Ready for framing . 
Writ* for prises. 
Husbtdsr a»d BrosTSatA", M Ooery Street, 
(tan rraaelaoo, Oal. 



11 



©tie Qvttbtv ani» &p(fvt&mtxn 



[JANij ahy 16, ]904 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of Johh Parrott, Esq.) 

Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

Sigh Stepping 
Hackney-Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER 8EALY, Manager. 




Oictatus Medium 32499 



Will make the coming season at 



Race Track, Hollister, Cal. 



Jog Sanchez In charge 

$40 FOR THE SEASON. 

Payable at time of service, with usual return privilege. 
Every care taken to prevent accidents, but no responsibil- 
ity should any occur. Prompt and careful attention in all 
cases Pasturage furnished to mares sent from a distance 
at $2 50 a month. 

A DICTATI S MEDIUM PURSE OF 8100. 
I will give a purse of 1100, with entrance money added 
for a race, best two in three, open to any and all colts from 
DICTATUS MEDIUM, the result of the breeding season of 1904, either pacers or trotters Must be 
three to start and raoe to come off on Hollister track, Fair week, 1907 (Exact date to be hereafter 
announced ) g5 entrance money, payable June 1, 1905. J5 thirty days before the race. Three 
moneys: 60 per cent to first horse; 30 per cent to second and tU per cent to third. For further par- 
ticulars, address „„,„„.™„ R - P 1 ATHKOP - Hollister. 

DESCRIPTION. 

DICTATUS MEDIUM is 6 years old, weighs 1320 pounds. A beautiful turned bay horse with 
heavy mane and tail, kind and gentle, with a perfect disposition. Good flat heavy bone. He has 
great power and speed. Has a record of 2:24, but has worked out in 2:12. He Is a horse that will go 
out any day and do his best. His colts are models of grace and beauty. Only one so far has been 
worked Thisone Al Willson's yearling LITTLE MEDIUM, paced an exhibition M mile on the 
Hollister Race Track in seconds, a 2:33 gait. This colt has great promise. 

IMCTATrs mkmii'M i- by Dictatus 2:17. one of the best bred and fastest horses ever brought to 
California The dam of Dictatus Medium is Belle Medium (dam of Stam B. 2:11*), by Happy 
Medium, grandsire of the dam of Lou Dillon 1:58'/,. His second dam Is Argents by Almont Light- 
ning, sireof the dam of Zombro 2:11. There is no doubt but Dictatus Medium will prove to be a sire 
of speed as well as good size, style and disposition. 



BAYSWATER WILKES 2:251 

Sire of KELLY BRK1GS 2:10* 



of 



Sable Wilkes 2:18 
Fanny Bayswater 

Dam of 2 in 2:30 



WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1004 AT 



WOODLAND, CAL. 



Fee $40. 

BAYSWATER WILKES is a sire of speed, size, good looks, soundness and gameness. Every 
one of his produce that has been trained can show standard speed. His sire, Sable Wilkes, also sired 
Nushagak.slreof Arlsto, winner of the Occident and Stanford stakes. His dam, Fanny Bayswater, 
is the dam of Senator L., holder of the champion four-mile trotting record of 10:12. 

Breed to BAYSWATER WILKES and you will get colts that will sell at good prices. 

For cards containing full Pedigree and all particulars address 

S. H. HOY, Winters, Cal. 



SIDNEY DILLON 23157 

( LOU DILLON 1-5RW (the Fastest Trotter and Greatest Record Breaker in the world), 
Sireof | Uolly D ii l0D 2:C65K (the fastest mare of 1901), B. S. Dillon 2:16* and Captivity 2:28V4- 

SANTA ROSA STOCK FARM 

BANTA ROSA, OAL, 

SIDNEY DILLON was sired by Sidney 
2:IS3£; dam Venus (dam of Adonis 2:11H, 
Leah 2:24'4, Cupid 2:18 and Juno, the dam of 
Mercury 2:21 and Ida 2:30) by Venture 2:27X, 
sire of dam of Directum 2:0r,« SIDNEY 
DILLON is a model of symmetry and im- 
parts his grand individuality, inherent speed 
and excellent disposition to all his progeny. 

Terms for the Season, $100, 

Only a limited number of approved mares 
taken. Usual return privilege. In case horse 
is sold service fee will be returned if mares 
have not proven in foal. Season ends July 
1, 19HI Pasturage £4 per month. Best of 
care taken of mares, but no responsibility 
assumed for accidents or escapes For par- 
ticulars regarding shipmeDtoi mares, eto , 
address FRANK TURNER, 

Supt. Santa Rosa StocK Farm, 

Santa Rosa, Cal. 
Or IRA PIERCE, 728 Montgomery St., S. F. 




THREE-YEAR-OLD 

2:152 



No. 23444 

STAM 8, 



FOUR-YEAR-OLD 

2:111 



A Colt Trotter lliinsel f , and His Produce Perform Early, and the Blood of the Two- 
Mlnnte Trotters. Futurity and Horse Show Winners can be found In his Veins. 



WILL H \ 1\ K 
THE SEASON 



S From Feb. 15 to June 1, 1904, at PLEASANTON 

AFTER THAT DATE (by request) AT SALEM, OR. 

At $40 the Season, or $60 to insure. 

For further particulars address SAMUEL GAM RLE, Pleasanton Cal. 

Or TUTTLE BROS., Rocklln, Cal. 



Fast Pacer For Sale. 

THE PACING GELDING, AL SANDY 2:1!)'* 
* by Wayland W., dam Rapid Ann by Overland. 
Can pace three heats better than 2:17. Can brush 
very fast on the road. Excellent prospect to race. 
He is one of the best road horses in the city. 
Gentle and intelligent. Safe for lady to drive. 
For price and further particulars address S. 
WATSON, 235 Douglas street, San Franoisco. 



FOR SALE. 

T)LACK TROTTING MARE, RECORD 2:18}<; 
1 ' standard bred; sound: nearly 16 hands high; 
weighs about 1100 pounds. Gentle and a high- 
class road mare. Can be bought cheap. To see 
the mare and for particulars call or address 
Telephone: Pine 1786 J. W. ZIBBELL, 

345 Twentieth Ave., San Francisco. 



aB^cl! 



Dairy Notes. 

The celebrated Holstein-Fresian cow, 
l'egis Inka, recently Bold at auction for 
$1(500. 

Some believe that it pays to scrub the 
mangers every two months with soap, 
lye and water. 

Wooden churns have been found the 
best. They are easy to cleanse with hot 
water, and when sunned, keep sweet and 
clean. 

A good, steady churning is better than 
to churn at too rapid a rate, whatever be 
the shape of the churn. Two much haste 
leaves butter in the milk. 

It has been found that the most satis- 
factory churn has no inside fixtures of 
any kind. The creameries find that 
paddles, dashers, etc., are inclined to 
break the globules of butter, and are 
difficult to keep clean, as the cream ad- 
heres to them. 

One cannot please the market V y salt- 
ing butter to please his taste. Find out 
from each customer how he wants his 
butter salted, and fix it so to his taste 
that he will be willing to pay a good price 
for it, and will prefer yours to any other. 

Really, the best way to mend old dairy 
utensils is to get new ones. It is difficult 
enough to keep everything clean under 
the most favorable circumstances; it is 
much more difficult to keep them sweet 
if they have numerous rough, patched 
places. 

Not every man who starts out to get 
good prices and make a good reputation 
succeeds Some spend lots of money and 
come out dead broke. He will probably 
learn if he perseveres, and his money 
does not give out. But it is worth the 
effort to those who love the work. 

Cows bought for family use should be 
tried by the purchaser. It does not nec- 
essarily follow that because a cow does 
good work for one person, and sur- 
rounded bj certain conditions, that she 
will do the same for another persorj 
under other conditions. This is th< 
reason that some highly recommended 
cows have not given satisfaction. 

A New York milk inspector is said to 
have notified some milkmen that he had 
found a million bacteria to a half a 
spoonful of their milk, which was the 
danger limit. Surely no milkman could 
ask for a more accommodating Inspector 
than that. They certainly would not 
want to impose upon his customers more 
than a million bacteria in a half a tea- 
spoon of fresh milk! 

o 

Says a Chicago journal: Just what 
meat contracts have fallen into the maws 
of the packers, owing to the war prospect, 
are a matter of conjecture. Packers are 
not in the habit of asking the public to 
step in and look at their books, but that 
both Japan and Russia are their customers 
is without doubt. Naturally they are 
averse to making details known, as these 
are short time orders and if of large 
volume would be calculated to arouse 
bullish sentiment in the country and re- 
tard marketing. But the killers are known 
to be pressed for supplies, and this is one 
strong feature of the outlook from the 
growers' standpoint. 

o 

Roup may be generally traced to want 
of cleanliness, lice or undue exposure to 
wet and cold weather. 

Always aim to keep your poultry as 
well as all other stock on the farm on 
good terms with you by keeping on gocd 
terms with them. 

We have found that a laying hen is 
never classed as a lazy hen, as she will 
keep herself busy if you give her a chance. 

Care should be taken that your henB do 
not get over-fed, or they will become over- 
fat and their eggs will not hatch. 

Scaly leg is the work of a minute insect 
that burrows itself under the scales of 
the legs. 

Poultry of all kinds must have careful 
every-day care, in order that you make 
the success with them that you are 
looking for. 



NEW MODEL 
1903 




TRACK SULKIES 

AND 

BEST ROAD CART MADE. 

O'BRIEN & SONS 

Cor. Golden Gate Ave. and Polk St. 
8AN FRANCISCO, CAL 




ROSE DALE STOCK FARM 

SANTA KOSA, CAL. 
Home of Daly 2:15, Washington Mc- 
Klnneyand St. Whips 2:31, 

has for SALE some broodmares, yearlings, bj 
Washington McKlnney. Good prospects for 1804 
and roadsters . 



,Iake your 
horses happy by pro- 
viding them with 

Pure-Salt 'Bricks! 

Warranted to contain 
nothing but refined dairy 
salt. A great modern conve- 
nience at a cost of about 5 cents 
per horse per 



Belmont 
Stable Supply d 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 



VETERINARY. 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Turin 

Infirmary and Kbsidencb— 81 1 Howard St.: 
between Fourth and Fifth Sts., San Francisco. 
Telephone: Main 467. 



Ira Barker Balziei 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage, Saddle and Roarf Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: 805 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 851. 

Dr. vx/ m, IP. £!gan. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. T. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinbur; 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at fne port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President oi 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco 
Telephone West 128. 

BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOL8TEIN8— Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1890 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and S-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhama 
competing. 5th year my Holstelna have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burke, 80 Montgomery St., S. F. 

JERSEYS, HOL STEINS AND DURHAM'S. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1878. William Nlles & Co.. Los Angeles, 
Oml. 



AYRSHIRE* Young Balls, Cows and Heifers. 
Registered. From prize winning families. Brown 
& Brandon Petalama Cal. 



JANUABY 16, 1904] 



(The $H*ccocr mtfc §p0rt9mmi 



IB 




Londod In O. I*, w . Smoltoloss. 
Winning' Highest Average at All Shoots. 



IK \OI WIM I UK UK Si ASK I (II; 



California Powder Works 

FACTORY LOADED SHELLS. 



Du Pont Gun Powder 

SMOKELESS, SHOT GUN and 

MILITABI POWDEB 

Black Powder for Sporting and Blasting Purpose* 
tfa« RopoUition of • Hnndml Yaari n the GautotM of 



C. A II A I OUT. Ammmt. 



DU PONT POWDER 

»19 Minion St.. Room 311, Baa Fra. «!•<•• Cal 



SMITH GUNS 



WIN 

LONGEST 
STRAIGHT RUNS 



At 8. r. Trip Shooting 
Association 

M»y SB-aS— 1«— SB 
VAUGHN. - - 79 Straight. 

fkudnkk, - ea M 

Alio longcit ilralEht ran 
and lint monl n ret live hlrdi 



If Tonr Dealer don't k«p them write the 



CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS — Office 330 Market St., San Francisco 

Man u fact urers of II KIU'K I l: S DYNAMITE. IIF.IUIIKN OF.LATINK, CHAMPION 
IMPROVED IU.ASTINO. BLACK BLASTING, BLACK SPORTINd 
C. P. W. SMOKELESS and MILITARY SMOKELESS. 
Also lell CAPS and FUSE. 

Parker Automatic Ejector 




The "Old Reliable's" 




Latest 
Attachment 

Send for Catalogue 



All Kinds of Ammunition . 



Catalog on 

application to 



Hunter Arms Co., Fulton, N. Y. 

PHIL. B. BEKEART CO.. San Francisco. Coast Representative 



SPRATTS PATENT. 



DOG 



CAKES 

REMEDIES 

SOAP. 



New Tork Saleirooni: 
32 Warren St. 



PARKER BROS.. Meriden, Conn. 



NEW "E. C." 

NEW "SCHULTZE" 
SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 

» THE AMERICAN T C." and "SCHULTZE" gunpowder Co., Ltd 

PHIL. B BEKEART CO., Paoiflo Coast Representative 




Kaantaerurad 



BALLISTITF 
The Standard Dense Powder of the World. ■■■■■■■ 

STILL LEADS AT THE TRAPS OR IN THE FIELD. 

Balllatlle wins from the limit marks In distance handicaps, at either lire birds or flying targets 
as it always gives the highest velocities with the closest and most even patterns at all ranges 
Ballistite is absolutely unvarying In results being waterproof, smokeless, odorless, without residue 
resaures lower than black powder, unaffected by age or climatic changes, and never pits, rusts or 
orrodes the barrels. Ballistite is sold with above guarantee. 

AM. OK AHOVF. ARK AMATEUR RECORDS. 

Take No One's Word. Try It for Yourself. 

75 CHAMBERS ST,, NEW YORK CITY 

Telephone 1747 Franklin. 



J. H. LAU &, CO. 



Importer* and Deftlern In Fire Arms, Ammunition and Fencing (ioods, 

Sole Agents for THE REBLE GUN and BALLISTITE (Dense) 
and EMPIRE Bulk, SMOKELESS POWDERS. 

A postal brings catalogue and "Shooting Facts" (third edition* 

BALLISTITF 
The Standard Dense Powder of the World. 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE EOOT REMEDY BEST* REMEDY 

KVEK USED ON HORSES' FEET. 

IT PENETRATES ami DRIES IN rjulckly and DOES 
NOT GUM and FILL UP THE PORES like tar and oil 
compounds. It Is the GREATEST REMEDY ever used to 
remove SORENESS and FEVER from the foot, and makes It 
possible to get good Rcrvlces out of a horse working on hard 
and hot pavements 

It gives natural nourishment to the foot and Incites a 
rapid, healthy growth-ALU DRYNESS AND HKITTLE- 
NESS quickly disappears. 

QUARTER CRACKS and SAND CRACKS are rapidly 
grown out when directions given In our booklet are followed. 

It is a SURE CURE for CORNS, CONTRACTED FEET 
and NAIL WOUNDS If directions are followed. 

It PRE.VEKTB SOUND FEET FROM MECOMINO UN- 
SOUND and GROWS a TOUCH. STRONG ELASTIC WALL 
and HEALTHY FROO-A FOOT WHICH WILL STAND 
WORK on racecourses. 

Many of tho best owners and trainers state that for track 
work nothing equals It. In many cases horses have reduced 
their reoords several seconds, due to Its use. 

It Is a CER'I AIN CURE for THRUSH and 8CRATCHE8 

We uaaraaicc That It Will Do What We Claim 
and Will Refund Money If It Falls. 
PRICKS :-Quarts. 11*); Half-Gallon, 11.75; Oallon, Ml/); 
2H-Gallon, 15 50; Five-Gallon, 110.00. 
Books giving full directions for Its use and much valuable Information as to shoeing are supplied 

'^Don't tall to read "ad." giving information concerning Campbell's Iodoform Gall Cure In next 
Issue of this paper. It lathe best and because of Its merits Is rapidly displacing all others. 

JAS. B. CAflPBELL&CO.. Manufacturers, 4 1 2 W.Hadlson St., CHICAGO, ILL 
Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock asklthem to write any Jobber for it 




NEWARK, N. J. Send for free copy of " DOG CULTURE." 8T I. Of IS. MO. 

Pacific Coa.t Branch— 1384 Valencia Street, San Francisco. 
Agents for " SANITAS " Disinfectant. 



HIGH-CLASS PUPPIES 

Especially some Fine TOI XI, HITCHES 

By Imp LENZIE PRINCE (winner of 47 First 
Prizes), Imp. BRAEHEAD COM MANDER and 
Imp. RIPPOWAN ARCHER. 

Kinds are Workers, Prlre Winners, and slrr wonderful 
workers and prl/e winners. 

GLEN TANA FARM KENNELS ~*£a£K™" 

SPOKANE. WASH. 



OOLTjIES. 




First St, 
San Jose 

stci) CHAMPION HANOVER MONARCH 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Advertitementt under thit head one cent per word 
per insertion. Caih to accompany order. 



BI LL TERRIERS. 



DULL TERRIERS FOR SALE— THE REGIS 
1 ' tered stud Bull Terrier FLYER by Llt'.le 
Flyer, out of Lorna Doone. and two young bitches 
one year and a half old; cheap. GEORGE FUR- 
LONG. Anaconda. Montana. 



COCKER SPANIELS. 



FOR SALE — COCKER SPANIEL PUPPIES 
by Ch. Hampton Goldle. Apply at junotloa 
old county and Redwood roads. Fruftvele, Alameda 



Ell'wyn t A. 8 tro?o'ge°r 99 fr 8 o ) m b Ch " Old' %U MooS- j 

Fee fcl«. Pictures and Pedigree upon applica j^.jgjdRfffffiuES *0*B.a 
High-class Puppies for sale. 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 

TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIER PUPPIES 
1 at 112 and 115 Sired by Champion Loyne 

Mas. 



tlon 



AT STUD 

CUBA Oh KENWOOD 

(Qlenbelgh Jr.-8tella> 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II) 

STQCKD ALE KENNELS 

K. M. DOOGE, Manager, 
Rakenflrld, Kern Co., 
Boarding Pointer Puppies and well brokea 
Dogs for sale. 



Q0C0ANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIOS 

FOB BALE IS LOTS TO SUIT BT 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO 

■OS California Street, Ban Franolioo, Cat, 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



-DBALBR8 IS- 



55-67-59-61 First Street, S. F. 
Tblbphosb Mais 1W 



COLI.IKS. 



fiOLLIE PUP9 FOR SALE— BY PRIZE 
^ winning Imported sires and dams, fit for 
bench, ranch or farm Bothsexet Prices accord- 
ing to quality. Correspondence solicited: all let- 
ters cheerfully answered THOS. 8. GRIFFITH. 
Box 1907, Spokane, Wash. 



ROSE HOTEL 

PLEAS ANTON. CAL 

Enlarged, Rebuilt. Twenty live New Konmi 
Newly Kiirnlilied. Electric Lights, 
Running Water Up to date 
A. S. OI.NEY & HON - - Proprietors 

Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cared In 4S Honrs. 



i 



1 



CAPSULES 



Superior to Oopalba, Cnbeba or Inje 



16 



££ite gveeftcv cmb g» port* man 



[January 16 i»04 




»»»»»»»» 

I u. 



M. C. AT SEA GIRT, 



4fc 




the annual military shoot, won the Wim= 
bledon Cup, Capt. Richards, Ohio, score 
91-100. 

Troop A, of New York, won the 
Revolver Team Match, using LI. M. C. 
.38 S. & W. special cartridges, score 849. 

Leech Cup Match, shot at 800, 900, 
and 1000 yards, was also won with 
U. M. C. .30=40 cartridges, by C. B. Winder, 
Ohio, score 94=105. 

T he Thomas Bullet 

now used in all U. M. C. .30 Government 
cartridges was used by practically every 
rifleman in every match where Government = 
made ammunition was not required. These 
facts speak volumes for U. M. C. military 
and big game cartridges. 

17. M. C. .30-40 cartridge* won the International 
Palma Trophy at Hisley, Kngland, against tha military 
r- i lie teams of the world 




The Union Metallic Cartridge Company 

Bridgeport. Conn. 



Agency, 313 BROADWAY, 

NEW YORK CITY. 



Depot, 86-88 FIRST ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




REPEATING SHOT GUNS 



A CHANCE FOR A DOUBLE 

A QUESTION often asked about Repeating Shotguns is, "How quick can a second shot befired with 
*» them?" Shooters that have used Repeaters answer with one accord : "Doubles" are just as easy to 
make with a WINCHESTER REPEATING SHOTGUN as they are with a double-barreled 
gun. The third shot that a Winchester Repeater gives often bags a badly crippled bird which otherwise 
would get away. Winchester Repeating Shotguns are made in "Take Down" styles in 12 and 16 gauge. 




Glabrough, Golcher & Go, 



RUNS 
Gun Goods 




FISHING 

Tackle 



for Catalogue. 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 



FACTORY . . . 
LOADED . . 



SHELLS 



DU PONT 
M E. C." 
SCHULTZE 
HAZARD 



SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BALLISTITE 
LAFLIN Sc RAND 
'INFALLIBLE " 



What More do vou Want? 



2 



fJ ANTJARY 23, 1904 



CAMPBELL'S 



IODOFORM GALL CURE 

For GALL BACKS and SHOULDERS, CRUPPER 
SORES and SADDLE GALLS there is none 

superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS USUAL 
For BARBED WIRE CUTS, CALKS, SCRATCH- 
ES. BLOOD POISONED SORES and ABRASIONS 
OF THE SKIN it has no equal. 

It is very adhesive and easily applied to a watery 
as well as a dry sore. 

Its use will absolutely prevent BLOOD POISON- 
ING. In this respect there is no Gall Cure offered 
which can justly even claim to be a competitor. 
We placed it on the market relying wholly on its 
merit for success, and notwithstanding the fact that 
comparatively little has been done in the way of 
advertising the sale* of 1900 were 100 per cent great- 
er than the aggregate sales of Gall Cure preceding 
that year. This increase was entirely due to its 
MERITS, and from it we feel justified in saying that 
It is THE GALL CURE OF THE 30TH CENTURY 
It is a quick and sure cure for those troublesome 
skin cracks under the fe -*ck v nioh injure and often 
lay up race horses. 

All Trainers Should Have It In Their Stables 

PKlCE:-3 OZ. BOX, «Sc; 1 LB. BOX, SI. OO. 

Read our "ad." on Campboll's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this pap* r. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs., 412 W. Madison St., Chicago, III. 

Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask them to write any Jobber for it. 

Speed, Breeding and Individuality 




RITA H. 2:11 1-4 

Pacing Mare by McKinney 2:11 1-4 

ELECTRO McKINNEY 

Brown Colt, Four-Year-Old Trotter by McKinney 2:11 1-4 

RITA H. is a dark brown mare who stands nearly 16 hands high, and will weigh in racing trim 
about 1050 lbs This mare has bad this year a very remarkable record. She started In the North- 
western Circuit in the States of Oregon and Washington, and out of eight starts won her first seven 
races and only lost four heats during the entire circuit, and has a pacing record of klljtf. The mare 
is five years old and is excellent on the road. She does not pull or lug, and a lady can drive her 
anywhere. Last spring she trotted a workout mile in 4:1854 and repeated in 2: 16V4. after only seven 
weeks' work. Her owner has driven her in 2:1254 In the Los Angeles Driving Club races, she having 
won all of them in which she started. This mare can step two heats below 2:10. 

ELECTRO McKINNEY is a brown stallion foaled in 1900, and stands 15 hands 1 inch in height. 
He trotted a full mile as a two-year-old in 2:31*, last quarter in x, seconds, and when a three-year- 
old a full mile in 2:2154. last quarter In 32 seconds He is perfectly gaited and a grand individual in 
every respect. Weighs about 950 lbs. ELECTRO McKINNEY is bred in the purple, and is one of 
the best sons of McKinney alive to day McKinney Is undoubtedly the greatest sire for his age, 
living or dead. ELECTRO McKINNEY was not raced last year, being only a three-year-old and 
not entered in any stakes it was decided to hold him over. 

These horses are all r'ght and there is not a thing the matter with them, but my business 
demands are suou that I cannot afford to devote any time to racing them. For prices and further 
particulars address 

BYRON ER KEN BR EC HER, 

301 CIKRIKK BlILDING, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Or Inquire at Office of BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 



A Sidney Stallion With Earning Capacity 



In pursuance of my intention to retire from the business of breeding horses, 
and having disposed of all my broodmares at auction, I now offer at private sale 
the stallion 

William Harold 2:131-4. 

His sire is the great Sidney 2;19ij, grandsire of the champion trotter of the 
world, Lou Dillon 1:58$, and his dam the great race and broodmare Cricket 2:10 
(dam of four in the list) by Steinway, the greatest son of Strathmore. 

WILLIAM HAROLD is a producer The only two of his get to start are 
that wonderfully fast trotter Janice 2:08}- and the pacer Dan Burns 2:15. 
WILLIAM HAROLD'S services in the stud were very limited up to three years 
ago, as he was raced. His weanlings, yearlings and two-year-olds are very prom- 
ising and have size, good looks and great natural speed, besides being uniform in 
color, nearly all bays. He is a sure foal getter, is in the very best condition, sound 
and healthy, and with ordinary good business management can earn in the stud 
in 1H04 the price asked for him. 

For tibulated pedigree and full particulars, address 

H. W. MEEK, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-five years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern Improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever Increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 




PERGHERON AND BELGIAN STALLIONS 



The Farmer's Supply tf 
the Middle West 



Cedar Rapids (Iowa) Jack Farm 



Three importations this season of prize-winning Percherons, Belgians 
and German Coachers and Catalan Spanish and Majorca Jacks. I have 
the largest Draft and Coach Horses In America and will sell more quality 
for the money than yau can find anywhere. Come and see for yourself. 

W. L. DE CLOW. 



Pedigrees Tabulated Xr w ^Bli~J. 

Sportsman, 36 Geary street, San Francisco, Cal. 




On Broken Down, Weak, Sprained and Ruptured Ligaments and 
Tendons Its Power is Unfailing. 

No Man need see his Horse suffer and become Incapacitated. 

"SAVE-THF-HflRSF" Sg^lY 1 ^^ PERMANENTLY CURES BONE AND BOG 
OMTL inL nUnOL SPAVIN, THOROUGHPIN, RINGBONE fexcent low rWhsjuri 

DONS." ANDAL^LAMENisS. 11 ' WINDPUFF - SHOE BblL, WEAK AnTsPRaTnED^E^ 

. '• SAV E- THE " H . ORSB " cures without scar, blemish or loss of hair; can be applied anywhere and 
In all conditions and extremes of weather. Horses may be worked as usual with shin or ankle boots, 
as no harm can result from destruction of hair or scalding of limb. "uois. 
Cured horses are absolute oertainties as to the possibility of the remedy for your own oase. Such 
carried "SAvTth^h™^ S^fiSSH J 1 "" 1 wh °fe reliability can be readily ascertained, have 
carried bA VE-THE-HORSE over skeptioism, prejudice and uncertainty. Send for the booklet 
make°it written guarantee, which is as binding to protect you as the best legal talent conld 

S5.00 ran. BOTTLE. 

Written guarantee with every bottle. Need of seoond bottle improbable, except In rarest 
cases. If your case is different we advise frankly as to possibility of the remedy effecting a cure 
Give veternanan s diagnosis, if he is competent. Desoribe age, development, location of swellings 
lameness and way horse carries and holds leg. ■ U » S| 

$5.00 a bottle at all druggists and dealers, or sent express prepaid. 

TROY CHEMICAL CO., Manufacturers, TROY, N. Y. 

D. E NEWELL, 519 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal., Pacific Coast Agent 



FOR SALE 



SAM FULLEN (Thoroughbred). 



By Imp. Cavalier, dam Lena 

dim Lilly Bobbit by Victory - SAM FULLEN Is* hlgh-clas's' stalllonT'Winnerof fourstakls^In 
arst-class condition. For price and further particulars address 



A. FORBES, 



Or BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 



5615 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, Cal. 



JAY-EYE-SEE 

Mb. J. I. Case, (Hickory Grove Farm, home I 
pf Jay-Eye-See) Racine, Wis., says: "After try- ' 
Jng every known remedy, I removed a large 
Bunch of two years standing from a 3-year old ' 
Ally, with three applications of 

Quinn's Ointment. 

It la the best preparation i have ever used or heard 
of. I heartily recommend it to all Horsemen. 
^ We have hundred! of luch tetlimoniali. 

Price $1.00 per package. 
Ask your druggist for it. If he does not keep It we 
. will send prepaid on receipt of price. Address a.- 

W-B. EDDY & CO., Whitehall, N. Y. 1 

mm 



"N/\r- 

YES 

FIRST-CLASS PASSENGERS 
SHOULD GO 



by the 



Golden State Limited 

A train embodying all 
the comforts and 
luxuries of home. 

San Francisco 

TO 

Chicago 
every day 

5 P. M. 

THROUGH WITHOUT CHANGE 
VIA EL PASO. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 



CALIFORNIA 

Photo Engraving Company 

HIUH CLASS ART 
Ill 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 
»«• Mlaalon St., ear. First, !•■ rraaclsco 



The Great California 
Liniment. 

For Lameness, Soreness 
and Deep-seated Pain; 
good for man or horse; 
used by every prominent 
horseman on the race 
tracks because it's the 
best— money can buy, 



All Druggists and Harness 
Dealers or Vita Oil Co., 
1533 Buchanan St 
San Francisco, Cal. 

J, A. McKerron and J. O'Kane. Agts 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school oa the Pacific Coast. 3X000 gradu- 
ates; 30 teaohers; 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually plaoed In positions. Send for oatalogse. 



E. P. HEALD, President. 



SITUATION WANTED 

\S TRAINER AND RACE DRIVER, BY A 
**■ thoroughly competent man, from the last, 
with experience. First-class references as to 
ability and character. Address T. C HARRIS, 
care of West Ranch, Fernando, Cal. 



JAN0ARY 23, 1904J 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

V. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 



Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast, 

-omci- 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
TtXKPHONI: Black 586. 



Term*— One Tetr S3. Six Month* SI .7ft. Threo IHnnlhi SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money snould be sent by postal order. dr»ft or by re mistered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kei.i.ey, 3S Geary St., San Francisco. Cml. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 23, 1004. 



GOOD ROADS do more to develop a country than 
any one thing and yet, paradoxical as it may 
seem, countries are generally pretty well developed 
before the roads are in a condition that may ho called 
good. This is because the cost is so great that a 
sparsely settled country caDnot afford the expense of 
good highways. Congress Mrownlow of Tennessee 
has introduced a bill that is now pending in Congress 
which appropriates $24,000,000 as national aid for the 
building of wagon roads. This sum is to be available 
at the rate of $3,000,000 a year; is to be divided ac- 
cording to the population of the different states, .but 
no state is to receive less than $250,000. Every state 
receiving national aid must appropriate and spend a 
like amount. The asserted growth of sentiment in 
favor of the measure has been chiefly due to the in- 
stitution and extension of the rural free mail delivery 
system, which has brought the disadvantages of poor 
roads home to the farmers and other country 
dwellers. Applications fo- the extension of the free 
rural delivery system are being refused by the Pott 
Office authorities on account of the roads, and the 
disappointed communities demand their improve- 
ment. These demands are so in excess of the ability 
of the local boards to respond to that for a year past 
highway commissions all over the country have been 
putting themselves on record in favor of national aid. 
The amount which California would receive under 
this bill would be $430,000 and with the same amount 
appropriated by the State a fund would be established 
that would make a great improvement in the roads of 
California. Nothing will help the horse breeding 
business more than good roads and for this reason 
alone our readers will doubtless favor the bill, and 
look for their representatives in Congress to vote for 
it. If every horse breeder in the State wcuHd write 
to the Congressman from his district, requesting him 
to support the bill, it would have a large ioiluence in 
favor of the measure. 



THE OCCIDENT STAKE for 1906 has 98 entries 
instead of 97 as stated on page 5 of this issue 
where the list of entries is printed. After the forms 
of our paper containing page 5 had been printed we 
received the following letter from Acting Secretary 
D. R. Miller: 

Sacramento, Cal., Jan. 21, 1904. 

Breeder and Sportsman— Please add to the 
Occident Stake for 1906 the following entry: 

S. Bartlett's ch f Flora Lowell by Frank B.-Miss 
Johnson. 

I have only received this entry this morning, but it 
is dated January 1st and postmarked Auburn, Janu- 
ary 1st, but the envelope is marked "mlssent," which 
accounts for its not having reached me before. 

I trust this will reach you in time for you to publish 
with the rest of the entries, at the same time calling 
attention to the fact that there are 93 entrieB. 

Very respectfully, L. R. Miller, 
Acting Secretary. 



THE $50,000 WORLD'S FAIR HANDICAP wll 
bo one of the groat races of 1904. It will be run 
In June at the St. Louis Fair Association meeting, 
which will hold one of the greatest meetings ever 
held in the country . According to the conditions of 
the stake it is reopened for entries to bo made on 
February 1st. The entrance foe for horses put in at 
that time is $750. Entries will close at the same time 
for a large number of additional stakes, the advertise- 
ment for which appears in our business columns this 
week. The World's Fair at St. Louis this year will 
cause that city to be visited by people from all parts 
of the globe, and horsemen will naturally want to kill 
two birds with one stone by taking in the fair and 
racing for some of the rich purses. The St. Louis 
Fair Association Stakesshould bellberally patronized. 



Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feet 



Is Siring Speed, Size and Style. 

From all points in the country to Cleveland, Ohio, 
intelligent horse breeders aro sending mares enough 
to the great trottor John A. MoKerron 2:04} to fill 
his book, and California breeders should remember 
that there is at San Jose a full brother to that horse, 
and keep in the front rank by sending him some of 
their mares. The horse referred to is Nearest 2:22* 
that has already produced one in the 2:10 list, the 
mare Alone 2:091 that took her record in 1902 and 
was the fastest four-year-old of heryear. Though not 
campaigned in 1903, she paced a half in 5'.»| seconds in 
a public exhibition, showing that she had more speed 
than any pacer in Califoania at the time. Alone isthe 
only one of Nearest's get ever raced, hut there w ill be 
several of them out before long and they will make 
him one of California's greatest speed sires. A half 
broke filly by Nearest out of a mare by Danton Moul- 
trie that is now at the San Jose track is one of the 
best prospects ever seen thero. She can step a 2:20 
clip now without boots or hopples, and is hardly 
bridlewise. When the bell rings for the* stakes she is 
entered in, her competitors will have to bo fast 
and just right or the race will not be interesting. 
The trotting mare Our Lady by Nearest that is now 
owned by Mr. H. B. Gentry, owner of MoKinney, 
stopped a trial of 2:20 at San Jose, before Mr. Gentry 
purchased her and is one of the handsomest marcs 
ever driven. 

All of the get of Nearest have size and good looks, 
and wise breeders aim for both theEe qualities when 
selecting a stallion. 

The breeding of Nearest is gilt edge. He combines 
the blood of the Wilkes, Director, Nutwood and 
Williamson's Belmont families and should be a very 
successful horse when mated with a mare carrying 
the blood of McKInney, Electioneer, Sidney, Stein- 
way, Sultan or any of the prominent stallions that 
have stood in this State. Mr. T. W. Barstow, owner 
of Nearest, has put the stallions fe« for 1904 at $40, 
certainly a very reasonable price, as the full brother 
John A. McKerron 2:04* is standing at a fee of $200. 



Association Formed at Pleasanton. 

Pleasanton, Jan. 21.— An association to promote 
the horse interests of this section has been formed 
with Lou Crellin as president and F. E. Adams as 
secretary. The directors are among the leading 
citizens of Pleasanton and are W. H. Donohue, A. F. 
Schweer, George Davis and G. A. Kelly. 

This association is to be permanent in its character 
and its has been decided that it will take charge of a 
race meeting to be held each year on the Pleasanton 
track. At the meeting this year tho association will 
offer $4000 in purses. 

Tho harness horse industry of Pleasanton is thriv- 
ing, and there are hundreds of the finest animals in 
the country s-ationed hero at all times. It is proposed 
by the racing association to give a meeting each year, 
at which animals can be both raced and exhibited. 
Such a meeting was held a year ago with marked 
success. 

Advisory Board's Decisions. 

At the meeting of the Advisory Board of the 
American and National Trotting Associations held in 
New York the following decisions were rendered in 
regard to time performances made in 1903: 

"We find that the performance of Lou Dillon at 
Cleveland, O., Septembor 12, 1903, in 2:05 to a high- 
wheeled, ball-bearing sulky, with a pace-maker, with 
dirt shield in front, was not a record, because the 
mare had previously^ performed in faster time, which 
performance was her record, and preoluded a slower 
performance being a record. 

"We also find the performance of Maud S. at 
Cleveland, O., in 18X5, was to a high wheeled, plain 
axle, according to rules; that the time, 2:08$, was not 
only her best time, but the best time ever made up to 
that date, and was a record. 

"No record can bo made with a 'wind shield' other 
than the ordlnarydirtshiold and pace-makerin front. 

"A porformanco with pace-maker in front, with 
dirt shield, shall bo recorded with a distinguishing 
mark, referring to a note stating the facts." 



Will Race on the Speedway. 

Members of the San Francisco Driving Club will 
moot on the Sp<>odway In Golden Oato Park at 11 
o'clock a. m. to-morrow, Sunday, January 2Uh, and 
hold three races. All the events will bo half-mllo 
heats, best two lo three, and some good sport can bo 
expected. Tho entries are as follows: 

First race— Mr. Verlach's Gertie A., Mr. Becker's 
Dan Aldon, Mr. Cuicelio's Button or Puerto Rico, 
Mr. Sprague s Clara O , Mr. Watson's A I Sandy. 

Second race — Mr Kllsworth's Bill KllHworth, Mr. 
Finch's Edward, Mr. Verlach's Victor, Mr. Pease's 
Monkey, Mr. Cuicelio's Welladay. 

Third race — Mr. Lottawasser's Bellflower, Mr. 
Cuicelio's Ladv Lou, Mr. Benson's Starry Banner, 
Mr. SchotMer's Roy, Mr. Taylor s Zulu Lass. 



Sacramento Track News. 

Sacramento, Jan. 20, 1904. 
Training is almost at a standstill here at Agrlcul 
tural Park, as the track Is too wet to work on, owing 
to the rain of Sunday last, but as tho roads are good 
jogging is done on them whenever the woather la 
clear, and tho Sacramento Driving Club, that has 
been compelled to postpone Its matinee twtceintho 
last month on account of rain, will race next Sunday 
on tho track unless another downpour stops them. 
As the country needs rain, and it has only fallon on 
the days whon the driving club announces a matinee, 
the weather bureau officials here are almost tempted 
to promise the farmers another shower on Sunday 
next. 

Walter Masten has the largest string here at the 
present time. He has Falrofe 2:19, Penrose (the fast 
son of Falrose) and several youngsters by McKInney 
and Diablo. Walter is swoet on his three-year-old, 
Marvin Wilkes by Don Marvin, that won second 
money In the two-year division of the Breeders Fu- 
turity last year and would have made the winner 
step faster had he not boen so unfortunate as to 
throw two shoes during the first beat of the race 
Marvin Wilkes will make the th ree-ycar olds stop 
some this year to beat him. 

L.W.Clark is training a string of six. Thoy aro 
Outboul 2:22} by Stamboul 2:07}, the three-year-old 
filly Ouiboullta by Ouiboul out of Lady Turner that 
Is the pride of his heart, two young trotters by Silver 
Bow 2:16, a two-year-old by Owyhee 2:11 and ono 
other that I don't just remember the breeding of. 

Chris Jorgensen has several head in training, the 
majority being road horses, some of them high class. 

Mrs. Kniinj \V. Callendine has Guynut, a three- 
vear-old by Nutwood Wilkes; also Lady Caretta, a 
two-year-old that is entered in the Breeders Futurity. 
She is quite a promising filly. She also has Sir Carl- 
ton, that is entered in the Occident Stake. "Carly," 
as his fair owner calls him, is quite a trotter, and the 
horsemen here say he will be the winner of his year. 

Mrs. Callendine is an enthusiastic lover of- the 
trotter and breeds medal winning stock. 

U. S. Mitchell is training here the colt Peter 
Shields and three more by Zombro2:ll, besides some 
others that are showing well. 

Mr. Haggin has five In his string, among them a 
filly by McKinney and one by Nutwood Wilkes that 
are entered in stakes. Yours, Lady Norink. 

Answers to Correspondents. 

W. W. P., Butte City— Please give the breeding of 
Clifton Bell. 

Answer —Clifton Bell, Register No. SUB, bay horse 
foaled 1883, got by Electioneer 125, dam Clarabel by 
Abdallah Star, son of American Star Jr.; grandsm 
Fairy by Hambletonian 10; great grandam Krama 
Mills by Rediker's Alexander W. Bred by Leland 
Stanford, Palo Alto Stock Farm. 



Monroe Silisbury has discovered another promis- 
ing trotter. Last year ho purchased from the horses 
that Louis Carlllo was working at Pleasanton for Mr. 
A. W. Shippee, a black gelding by Hawthorn© that 
was a nice stepper snd a good looker. The horse was 
purchased for Mr. Salisbury 's brother who lives in 
Salt Lake city, to use as a road horse, and was left 
with that gentleman when the Salisbury string 
stopped at Salt Lake on its way East. The horse 
showed so well on the road that his owner shipped 
him back to Pleasanton last month for a little train- 
ing. Charles De Ryder drove tho black one day last 
week and let him step the last half of the mile. He- 
made it inl:04and three or four watches stopped at 
1:03}. Perhaps the horse will be permitted to race a 
little and get a record beforo be goes back to the 
road again. 



To dato thirteen stallions have sired one hundred 
or morestandard performers, the list bcingas follows: 
Onward 2:25}, 174; Nutwood 2:18f, 169; Red .Wilkes 
160; Electioneer 160; Alcantara 2:23, 153; Gambetta 
Wilkes 2:19}, 143; Pilot Medium 121; Simmons 2:28, 
119: Allerton 2:09}, 118; Wilton 2:19}, 115; Paron 
Wilkes 2:1H, 109; Robert McGregor 2:17} 101; Sldnev, 
pacing, 2:19$, 100. Tho last two entered the list this 
year. Of the thirteen sires only six, Red Wilkes, 
Alcantara, (iambetta Wilkes, Allerton, Baron Wilkes, 
and Sidney, are now living. Allerton, seventeen 
years, is the youngeat. While thirteen stallions have 
sired one hundred or morestandard performers, only 
six are credited with 100 or more standard trotters, 
as follows: Electioneer 158, Onward 135, Nutwood 
133, Rod Wllket III, Alcantara lOii, Wilton 100. 



Charlps S. Caffrey, who built the high-wheel 
aulkies drawn both hy Maud S. and Lou Dillon, states 
that the sulky to which the former maro was hitched 
when she trotted in 2:08 was fitted with anti-friction 
roller-bearing axles, which, though not like ball- 
bearings, answer th" same purpose in reducing the 
friction incident to the use of ordinary steel bearings. 
Mr. Caffrey further says that the sulky drawn hy 
Maud S weighed about forty-three pounds, or twelve 
pounds less than the weight of tho ono drawn by Lou 
Dillon. But the Bonner heirs say the Maud S. sulky 
has no roller-bearings. 



1 



(Kite tjtvee&cv ctnb ^povt&man 



[January 23, 1904 



m JOTTINGS. 




THE MOST ABSURD RULING ever made in re- 
gard to harness horse records was the one made 
by the Advisory Board of the American and National 
Trotting Associations in which it was declared that 
Lou Dillon 'a mile in 2:05 to a high wheel sulky is not 
a record and does not displace the 2:083 ol Maud S. 
In other words, the protest made by the sons of 
Robert Bonner was sustained. The text of the de- 
cision is as follows: 

"We find that the performance of Lou Dillon at 
Cleveland, Ohio, September 12, 1903, in 2:05 to a high- 
wheeled, ball bearing sulky, with a pacemaker, with 
dirt shield in front, was not a record, because the 
mare had previously performed in faster time, which 
performance was her record, and precluded a blower 
performance being a record." 

Shades of the great Blackstone, and of all the law 
makers and commentators from the time ( f Moses to 
the present day: wouldn't that jar you? The Advis- 
ory Board would have done better had it struck out 
everything after th« word "because" and let it goat 
that. If Lou Dillon's mile in 1:68) at Memphis, when 
hitched to a modern bike, precludes her getting a 
record of 2:05 to a high wheel sulky, then it must 
necessarily preclude her getting a record of 2:00 to a 
wagon. According to this decision of the Advisory 
Board, Lou Dillon could not get a record if she pulled 
a stape coach a mile in two minutes. Was anything 
more absurd ever handed down by any deliberative 
body'.-' Why, according to thi9 interpretation of the 
rules, nearly all the wagon records are null and void 
because the horses making them "had previously 
performed in faster time" when hitched to a bike. 
If there is anything more ridiculous in the entire 
history of harness racing jurisprudence will some one 
please point it out. I have an idea that this decision 
is a record in itself, but according to the law laid 
down by the Advisory Board it may not be, as the 
Board may have, at some previous date, made a worse 
one, and if so this one don't count. 



There has been considerable said recently in some 
of the magazines and other Eastern publications 
about the Americo-Arab horse as the only horse in 
America that can be depended upon to reproduce his 
type. When we read these amusing effusions about 
the Americo-Arab we are always reminded of the 
question asked by Monroe Salisbury of a man that 
wanted to sell him a hone. After listening for a half 
hour to a glowing description of the horse's conforma- 
tion and a statement of his pedigree back to the 
'Steenth" cross on both sides, the Kingmaker said: 
"That's all very good, but what can hedo? " As the 
horse did not have speed for the track or road Mr. 
Salisbury had no use for him. We have heard 
much from Randolph Huntington, John Gilmer 
Speed and Colonel Spencer Border about the type of 
the Americo-Arab and his wonderful beauty, and we 
wish some of them would now tell us what he can do 



An Excellent Sale. 



Last Monday evening, Mr. William G. Layng, pro- 
prietor of the Occidental Horse Exchange at 240 
Third street, in this city, sold at auction ten thor- 
oughbred horses, the property of W. B. Sink Jr., the 
well known turfman. The sale was one of the most 
successful held in this city for years and good prices 
were obtained. Mr. Sink will leave soon for France, 
where he has accepted a position to train and manage 
a large Btable of horses. Mr. Lay ng engaged for his 
auctioneer at this sale Col. William Riley, known to 
every horseman who follows the Grand Circuit as 
"silver voiced Bill" Riley, who sells the auction pools 
all through that great circuit of harness racing, and 
who made a most favorable impression on this, his 
first appearance on the block in California. The 
prices obtained for the horses were as follows: 

The Mist, b f, 1902, by Magnet-Tenebrae, to H. 
Hammond for $2300. 

T. J. Cox, b c, 1901, by Libertine-Grace S., to J. C. 
Murray for $500. 

Impromptu, b g, 1898, by Crescendo- Amida, to J. 
W. Painter for $225. 

St. Winifrede, ch f, 1900, by St. Carlo-Santa Cruz, 
to J. W. Painter for $1100. 

Wolhurst, b g, 1894, by Ventilator-Nutbrown, to 
D. Anthony for $450. 

Glendenning, ch g by St. Carlo-Glenlivet, to H. 
Hammond for $1550. 

Rose Farr, ch f, 1901, by imp. Crighton-Sevens, to 
F. G. Reynolds for $525. 

F. E. Shaw, ch c by Magnet-Vioia, to W. Fisher 
for $4000. 

Wiggins, b f, 1901, by Sam Lucas-Callatine, to Mc- 
Allister & Co. for $925. 

The Fog, ch c by Magnot-Tonbrao, to "Boots" 
Durnoll for $2,300. 



Kinney Lou 2:073-4. 

Now that McKinney 2:1 J ^ has gone from California 
breeders are beginning to realize the value of his 
blood, and the desire to own a ton or a daughter of 
the great sire has caused every one of his get offered 
for sale to be snapped up quickly. McKinney is a 
great horse, but if there is any such tbingas improve- 
ment in breeding, why should not one of his sons 
prove much greater than he? 

Thei'e will be standing for service at San Jose this 
year, for a short season ending May 1st, the stallion 
Kinney Lou 2:07iJ, owned by Budd Doble, the re- 
nowned reinsman who piloted to world's records Dex- 
ter, Goldsmith Maid and Nancy Hanks. Mr. Doble 
purchased Kinney Lou two years ago, and last year 
campaigned the horse on the Grand Circuit. He 
closed the season winner of $11,450 and holding a rec- 
ord of 2:073, made in the second heat of a hotly con- 
tested race. During the season Kinney Lou won six 
bests in better than 2:10, and aithough a sick horse 
part of the time gained a reputation of being as game 
as the gamest that ever fought for first place under 




A Son of Kinney Lou— Foaled 1002. 

the wire. When it is considered that of all the nu- 
merous band of trotters that were out for the money 
in 1903 but six won upwards of $11,000, the great 
showing made by this brown son of McKinney is 
apparent. It is Mr. Doble's intention to again try 
conclusions with the fastest trotters on the Grand 
Circuit this year, and for that reason Kinney Lou's 
stud season will be limited to a dozen mares and will 
end May 1st. 

This stallion was bred for a trotter and on breeding 
alone no horse is more entitled to be one. His sire 
McKinney we all know about. He is the greatest 
sire of his age that has yet been produced. He has 
54 in the 2:30 list and of these fifty per cent are in the 
2:15 list. This alone is a wonderful showing but he 
enjoys another distinction — he has five trotters in 
the 2:10 list, which is more than any other stallion 
has of whatever age. To be the champion sire of 2:10 
trotters at sixteen years of age entitles McKinney to 
the honor of champion trotting sire without a ques- 
tion. So much for the sire of McKinney Lou. 

The dam of Kinney Lou is that famous game old 
race mare Mary Lou 2:17, bred by the late J. L. Mc- 
Cord of Sacramento. She is remembered by every 
horseman who attended the meetings on the California 
circuit twelve or fifteen years ago. She was a great 
winner in her day and the race was never too long for 
her. Mary Lou was an own sister to the famous 
trotter Shylock 2:15$ and to that well known pacer 
Ned Winslow 2:12$. It was a game family clear 
through. The dam of Mary Lou, Shylock and Ned 
Winslow was Brown Jenny, the great broodmare by 
Dave Hill Jr. and the grandam was by Black Hawk 
767. Through these two stallions McKinney Lou gets 
two strains of the best Morgan blood ever brought to 
this State and intelligent breeders hold it in high 
favor. The sire of Mary Lou was Tom Benton 15705 
that was by Senator Stanford 's great broodmare sire 
Gen. Benton out of Nelly Patchen, a daughter of Geo. 
M. Patchen Jr. 31. Great speed and gameness come 
through these lines. Tabulate Kinney Lou's pedi- 
gree back four crosses and there will be fouud racing 
and producing families on both sides and in every 
branch. Mr. Doble has put Kinney Lou's fee at $100 
for the season and quite a number of mares have 
already be* n booked. 

The oldest of Kenney Lou's get are two years old. 
He was bred to but a very few that year and the fol- 
lowing year served fifteen mares up to the time Mr. 
Doble bought him and took bim east. There are 
eleven yearlings, the result of that reason's services. 
All his colts are much like him. They are bays or 
browns and in size, conformation and disposition a 
credit to any horse. 



An English Opinion. 

In a late issue of the London Live Stock Journal, 
appeared the following in regard to the recent wit- 
nlng of a first prize at the New York Horse Show by 
Forest King: 

"The news that has reached this country by cable- 
gram to the effect that Forest King, driven by his 
new owner, Mr. Moore, has taken first prize in single 
harness at New York show, defeating, among others, 
the crack Lord Brilliant, should instill courage into 
the hearts of hackney breeders on this side of the 
Atlantic. No doubt Forest King is quite an ex- 
ceptional mover, and with one exception, namely, 
when he went down before Heathfield Squire last 
autumn at Cardiff show, he possessed an unbeaten 
record as a harness horse. The fact of his great 
achievements in this country having been so numer- 
ous, may therefore induce some people to say, "Ob! 
Forest King was an exceptional horse." So no doubt 
he was, and so is Lord Brilliant, whom he beat; acd 
consequently, New York being the leading harness 
horse show of America, we are entitled to claim that 
the best English horse— a full-blooded hackney, by 
the way — can beat the best of the Americans. 

It is perfectly permissible, I should say, to carry 
the argument a little further, and to suggest that as 
our best can beat their best on their own ground, it 
is highly probable that our other topsawyers can 
hold their own with the American horses. A New 
York champion, Von Harbinger, has done very well 
in the show ring since he landed on these shores some 
years ago, but his successes, when pitted against our 
crack animals, have not been so conspicuous as to 
justify our breeders being afraid of competing any- 
where against the best horses of America or else- 
where. The victory of Forest King, moreover, has 
proved a contention of mine, which I am very glsd 
to see corroborated by such an emphatic and practical 
illustration, namely, that English horses will get as 
much fair play meted out to them in America, and 
judged by American judges, as they receive in Eng- 
land with one of their own countrymen in the ring. 
How the idea got about that there was more prejudice 
rampant in America than here I could never under- 
stand, for both observation and experience have con- 
vinced me of the fallacy of the impression. 

At all events, it is to be hoped that now English 
hackneymen and others who exhibit horsef, atd who 
are influenced by patriotic motives, will be induced 
to arrange a friendly invasion of American shows and 
ascertain the strength of the enemy upon his own 
ground. In the case of the hackney, it is most 
desirable that something should be done in that 
direction, for in spite of the plucky stand that is 
being made by its transatlantic admirers, the breed 
is not making the progress in America that it should. 
Not many weeks ago, a friend residing near New 
York, in writing to me, said: "The hackney men are 
being swamped out of the field in the States, not be- 
cause the horse is not good enough to hold his own, 
but because his enemies are so numerous and bis 
friends so few. The public here are about sick of 
seeing the same horses out every year, and unless 
some new blood is introduced, just for the take of 
variety, popular interest in the breed will die out." 
All this seems so true that it would be a work of 
supererogation to enlarge upon it; but surely the 
victory of Forest King should accomplish a great 
deal in the way of reviving the popularity of the 
hackney in the States. 

It must, at all events, be a very bitter pill for the 
hackney phobes of both countries to have to swallow, 
and no doubt attempts will be made to explain it 
away. Deeds, however, are always more powerful 
than words, and the fact will always remain that a 
pure-bred hackney has beaten the cracks of Ameiica 
in single harness at New York show. 



Polo Dates are Changed. 

There is every assurance that the tournaments to 
be held this spring by the California Polo and Pony 
Racing Association will mark a new era in these 
sports in this State, and be the most successful ever 
held on this Coast. A change of dates has recently 
been announced and it is now decided that the meet 
ai Del Monte will be held from February 18th to 22d 
inclusive, and at Burlingame from February 26th to 
29th inclusive. All entries for the events to be decided 
at these meets will close on February 14th. At both 
places the program will consist of polo and pony 
racing on alternate days and the handsome trophies 
already arranged for will attract a very large number 
of entries. Owing to the importance of these meets, 
there will be great rivalry among the contestants, 
who are already casting about for the best ponies to 
be found, and there is a demand for both racing and 
polo ponies of quality that cannot be supplied. 



For all kinds of weather there is no drink like 
Jackson's Napa Soda — plain or in a lemonade. 



January 23, 1904] 



5 



Payments in Occident Stakes. 

Acting Secretary L. R. Miller of the California 
State Agricultural Society sends us the following lists 
of foal9 on which payments have been made in the 
Occident Stakes of 1905 and 190*>. There are 81 en- 
tries in the stake of 190t>, which is for the foals of 15M33. 
This is a splendid showing, especially as both Palo 
Alto Stock Farm and the Jesse D. Carr estate made 
no entries, while in former years they made four or 
five each. 

Kntrle* that Made Second t'Ajrmeot In HnOmIM Stake 
of 190.V 

C. A. Arvedson's b c Kettus. 

W. O. Bower's br c Ferd Madison; ch f Sylvia B. 

Alex Brown's br f by Nushagak-Addie W.; b c by 
Nushagak-Pioche; be by Nushagak-Adahalia; b f 
by Prince Ansel-Manna Martin. 

J. T. Bunch's b f Zella McKinney. 

I. L. Borden's ch c Prince Robert. 

T. W. Barstow's b f Just It. 

Mn. E. W. Callendine's b c Sir Carlton. 

John A. Cole's blk c Prince Valentine; b f Near 
Kinney. 

W. C. Greene's b f Jessie Mc. 

Martin Carter's ch f by Nutwood Wilkes-Zeta Car- 
ter; be by Nutwood Wilkes-Ingar; b f by Nutwood 
Wilkes-Bessie C; b c by T. C.-Lew G. 

S. Comisto's b f Alice C. 

C. A. Durfee's b c Galindo; b c Covey. 

W. G. Durfee's b f by McKinney-Leonor; b f by 
Coronado-dam by Guide; b f by Coronado-dam by 
Woolsey. 

W. R. Murphy's b c Golden Boy. 

Geo. W. Ford's b f Colaneer. 

Faris Stock Farm's b f Monabella Benton; gr f 
Alice W. 

E. P. Heald's b c by Nutwood Wilkes-Prlncess 
McKinney. 

S. H. Hoy's ch c Ben Hoy. 

J. B. Iverson's b c North Star; ch c Derby Chief. 
W. F. Jordan's b c by Elect Moore-Kitty E.; b f by 
Elect Moore-Black Swan. 
J. A. Jones' b f Bellemont. 
Geo. W. Kingsbury's ch f Delia K. 
Ed Kavanaugh's ch c Staysail. 

Wm. Morgan's blk c Kaiser; be Una Boy; br c 
Signet. 

S. F. Martin's blk c Kenneth C. 
A. J. Molera's br c by McKinney-Dr. Frasee's 
Sister. 

A. H. Martin's b c Blennerhassett. 

I. Morehouse's b f by Monterey-Magenta. 
I. C. Mosber's b c Oosoola; b f Gluck. 
Robt. Noble's ch f Rosebud. 

F. J. O'Brien's b f Zwilka. 

Oakwood Park Stock Farm's b f by Owyhee-Pippa; 
b f by Owy hee-Economy: b f by Charles Derby-Susie 
Mambrino; b f by Charles Derby-Tone; b f by Owy- 
hee-Nanie Smith. 

Mrs. S. Runyon's b c by Exioneer-Dextress; b c by 
Mendocino-Coressa. 

J. W. Rea's b f Miss Eva B. 

W. J. Leet's b f Still Better. 

Wm. B. Rankin's b f McKinney Belle. 

Rosedale Stock Farm's b c by Washington McKin- 
ney-Dalia; b c by Washington McKinney-Darion. 

Fred Raschen's b f by Iran Alto-Bell Bird. 

Ed Sewell's b f Lulu Mack. 

James K. Wilson's b f Plaster Lilly. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's b f Carlocita. 

H. Hogoboom's b c Palo King. 

Thomas Smith's b f by McKinney-Daisy S. 

George Trank's br f Lady Baron. 

L. H. Todhunter't b f /.ombell; b f Zomitella. 

Valencia Stock Farm's br f La Belle Harriet; bg 
by Direct Heir-Rosed rop. 

C. H Williams' br c by McKinn^y-Twenty-third. 

B. F. Wellington's b c Navarre. 

Le Moyne Wills' brc Hancock Johnston. 
J. Webber's b f Queen Fay. 
George L. Warlow's b f Sextette. 

Entries to Occident Stake of{190(). 

C. A. , -vedson's blk f Ella A. by Sutter-Lady 
Phelps 

J. N. Anderson's blk f Delia Derby by Chas. Derby- 
Norah D. 

J. C. Adam's ch c Arizona by Mendoclno-Wilfan ; 
b c Arizona McKinney by McKinney-Llllian Wel- 
bourn; b f Princess Russell by L. W. Russell-Prin- 
cess McCarty. 

W. O. Bowers' ch f by Silver B.-May. 

Alex Brown's b f by McKlnney-Pioche; b f by 
Nushagak-Red flower; br c by Nushagak-Bonny 
Derby; br c by Nushagak-Chamols; br c by Nush- 
agak-Everette. 

T. W. Barstow's br c Nearest McKinney by Mc- 
Kinney-Maud J. 

J. H. Bohon's br f Zona B. by Zolock-Hytu. 

Geo. T. Becker s br f Bena Brack by McKlnney- 
Whlsper. 



Thos. H. Brent's br f Magladi by Del Norte- 
Laurelia. 

Geo. A. Cressey's ch c by L. W. Russell- Elsie; b c 
by Prince Nutwood-Daisy E. 

J. F. Colombot's b c by McKinnej -Prunella. 

James Conin's b c Lord Dillon by Sidney Dllloc- 
Lady well. 

Martin Carter's ch f by T. C.-Ingar; b c by Nut- 
wood Wilkes-Bessie C; b c by Nutwood Wllkei-L*w 
G.; bf by Stam B.-Llda W.; b c by Zolock-Georgle B. ; 
ch f by T. C. -Queen C. 

W. G. Durfee's b c by Petigru-Ludenla. 

T. J. Drals' b c Drals McKinney by Guy McKinney - 
Blanche Ward. 

M. C. Delano's b f by Wm. Harold -Directess. 

Wm. De Pons' b c Vibrator by Azmoor-Melrose. 

Rae Felt's br c Sain Direct by Bonnie Dircct-dsni 
Sain filly ; br c J . D. by Jay wood -Donna. 

Peter Fryatt's b f Easter Maid by Senator-Maud 1). 

Josle S. Frary's ch c Roy Dillon by Sidney Dlllcn- 
Lisette. 

Patrick Foley 's br c Major Montesol byMontesol- 
Lady Galindo. 

Faris Stock Farm's be Doctor Cox by Nutwood 
Wilkes-Judlth; br c Jas. Faris by MonbelU- Edith. 

Griffith A McConnell's blk I by Bonnie Direct-Nettie 
O.; br f by Bonnie Direct-Jennie Mac; b f by Bonnie 
Direct-Gin ger. 

M G. Gill's br c Kinney G. by Kinney Lou-Mattie 
G. 

Robt. Garside's b f by McKinney-Althea. 

H. Hahn's br c by Mendocino-Sallie Benton. 

Wm. Hashagon's b f Roseleaf by Falrose-Larney. 

Geo. W. Hayes' ch c Joe Bowers by Silver B. -Bessie. 

J. B. Iverson's b f Ruby McKinney by McKinney- 
Ruby; blk c Robineer by Robin-I voneer. 

C. L. Jones' br f Diwalda by Diablo-Walda. 

Orville O. Jonas' b c Ariel by Neernut-Midget. 

J. A. Kirkman's br c Volway by Stoneway-Vi va. 

T. F. Kiernan's ch c Vasnut by Vasto-Dalsy Nut- 
wood. 

Geo. A. Kelly's rn c by Antrim-Birdie. 
P. W. Lee's b f Stambtarte by Stam B.-Estarte. 
Wm. J. Leet's b c Dr. Ridgeway by Iran Alto- 
Lucile. 

Wm. Leech's b f Hiawatha by High Tariff-Silver 
Bells. 

A. J. Molera's br c by Excel-Melba. 
T. S. Montgomery's b c by McKinney-Dixie. 
E. Z. Miller's b c by Monochrome-Belle. 
Geo. C. Need's b c Golden Baron by Barondale- 
Mary B. 

Oakwood Park Stock Farm's blk f by Chas. Derby- 
Pippa; br f by Cbas. Derby-Naulaka; br c by Chas. 
Derby-Inex; br c by Owy hee-Lunado; b f by Stam B.- 
Ituna. 

E. C. Peart's ch Electro by Sutter-Bucnu. 

W. Parsons' b c McKinney P. by McKinney-Alberts. 

Rosedale Stock Farm's b f by Wash. McKinnej- 
Dalia; b f by Wash. McKinney-Darion. 

John Rowen's ch c Lodi by Monochrome-Clarion; 
b c Will Jordan by Monochrome-Mission Belle. 

Mrs. Sol Runyon's b c by Nushagak-Altwood. 

Alfred Solano'sb f Direct Stamboula by On Stanley 
-Twinny Stamboul; br f Belle Petigru by Peiigru- 
Belle Pointer; b c Prince De Gru by Petlgru-Organ- 
ette. 

Thos. Smith's ch c by Nutwood Wilkes-Daisy S. 
Sutherland A Chadbourne's b c Sam G. by Stam B 
-Bertie. 

C. Edgar Smith's blk c Direct McKinney by Key 
Direct-Lady Mack. 

Santa Kosa Stock Farm's b f by Sidney Dillon-By 
By; ch f by Sidney Dlllon-Carlotta Wilkes; ch c by 
Sidney Dillon-Guy Cara; b f by Sidney Dillon-By 
Guy; b c by Sidney Dillon-Pansy; ch c bj Sidney 
Dillon-Ftussle Russell; ch f by Sidney Dlllon-Bisrara. 

L. H. Todhunter's b c by Zombro-The Silver Bell; 
b c by Zombro-Itella. 

Tuttle Bros.' b f by Stam B. -Laurel. 

Frank S. Turner's ch o by Sid ney Dlllon-Eveleen ; 
ch f by Sidney Dillon-Roblet. 

Walter Tryon's br c Colonel \ by A/.moor-Topsy. 

Valencia Stock Farm's br f by Derby Helr-Glendo- 
veer; blk f by Direct Heir-Rosedrop. 

Vendome Stock Farm's b c Alto Kinnev by Mc- 
Kinney-Irantilla; b f Mrs. Weller by McKinney- 
Much Better. 

LeMoyno Wills' b c Julius LeMoyne by Conifer 
Bonnie Ela. 

C. H. Williams' b c by McKinney-Net. 

Geo. L. Warlow's b c Jacoletls by A thabln-.N'arcola. 

Dr. F. D. Walsh's b c by Washington McKinney. 



The Kenney Manufacturing Company, .VII Valencia 
street, San Francisco, has a second-hand Tocmey 
cart with wood wheels, extra heavy carriage tie, 
cushion, etc., that Is as good as new, having been 
used but little, which will be sold for l!*0, regular 
price 1135. Harness, blankets, etc., goes with it. 
They also have a fine surrey for sale cheap and manu- 
facture sulky wheels and attachments to order. 
Pneumatic tires, solid cushions put on all kinds of 
vehicles. * 



A Handsome Horse. 

On the front page of our issue this week is a phot, 
engraving of the stallion Mahomet, owned by Mr. A. 
C. Dletz, proprietor of the Ferndale Ranch, Santa 
Paula. Cal. Mahomet is one of a pair that Mr. Diet/. 
Is driving as a road team. They are full brothers 
six and four years old, are both pacers, and so near 
alike that the casual observer has difficulty in telling 
them apart. Mr. Pietz, who has long been a breeder 
of trotting and pacing horses, and has owned many 
goods ones, has been experimenting for the pat>t 
fifteen years In breeding for color, and has finally 

*u<n <Io<l in pleasing his ambition. Some yearn a^-o 

ho purchased, In Napa county, three parti-colon d 
mares, that were said by their owner to have bctl 
sired by an Arabian stallion. One of thefe mares bad 
taken the prize at the fair as the best saddle animal 
and the others were one and two years old. One die d 
before beiLg put to breeding. Of the others one wss 
black and white, and the youngest bay and white at d 
a pacer. Their dam was of Whlpples ilambletonian 
blood, dark bay or brown. The dam of Mahomet Is 
the ><ay and white mare. Mr. Dietz says: "Mahomet 
and his brother Arab are so near alike that it takes 
close inspection to detect the difference. They have 
most perfect heads, broad and with more intelligence 
than any horse I ever saw. They have the finci-t, 
softest skin, with hair like satin. They were both 
sired by Longworth 2:19, son of Sidney and sire of 
Alfred C. 2:12) and El Moro 2:1.1). There Is probably 
no such team in the United States Tbey have most 
perfect legs and feet and indicate the legs of a deer. 
The black and white mare, full sister to the dam, was 
bred to Mahomet, the oldest of the pair, and pro- 
duced a pure white colt with white eyes and white 
hoofs. I'nfortunately thiscoltdied from an accident." 

Something About Athalie. 

Grattan, that interesting writer on harness horre 
affairs, writes as follows in the last EMfudy Stack 
Farm: 

In the course of his stallion announcement, Mr. 
George L. Warlow, Fresno, Cal.. makes a prediction 
that is decidedly Interesting and, in all probability, not 
much out of line despite the task it sets before t be 
gentleman, who says: "Athalie is but sixteen yeais old, 
and if she lives to be twenty I will make her the 
greatest brood mare in the world as a speed producer." 
Athalie was bred in Kentucky, at Jacksonville, by H. 
C. Stone, who sold her to Bowerman Bros., from 
whom she passed to Mr. Warlow, then a resident of 
the State of Illinois. It is stated in the register tl at 
her second dam's breeding is not established. But 
the Year Book gives the breeding of her sensational 
yearling son as "dam Athalio by Harkaway 11808, 
second dam by Alcalde 103." And that is her breed- 
ing. Athalie has produced six standard perfoimers; 
the trotters Athanio 2:10, Athavls 2:18), Alhshlo 
2:241 and Athadon, yearling, 2:2"; the pacers Ita 
2:10) and Athnio2:14^. Athanio took his record in this 
country while a member of the Village Farm stable 
and was then sold to parties in Europe. There be 
was champion for at least one season, defeating the 
best trotters raced In Austria. He is the sire of The 
Aristocrat 2:12, pacing, record made this year. Atha- 
don is the sire of Sue 2:12}, Llsterlne 2:13} and five 
others. There is no telling what Mr. Warlow has up 
his sleeve, but It looks as if Athalie's 2:10 list Is get- 
ting ready to increase to about four, and if she con- 
tinues to th row speed with the same uniformity that 
has markod her past efforts in that direction she will 
pass Beautiful Bells, who is at the top with eleven 
performers. They are all trotters, but the fastest is 
Belleflower with a mark of 2:12}, while Athalie already 
has to her credit a 2:10 trotter. Harkaway, sire of 
Athalie, was sired by Strathmore 40H, and his dam 
was by Basil Duke, second dam by imp. Glencoe. 
Taking it all in all Athalie has a lot of gond blood, 
but from the standpoint of the stardard she is not 
very well bred. But she has done something, In fact 
has accomplished a great deal, so that whatever else 
may bo said about It she neods no one to offer npolo- 
gles for any la'.k of ancestors with pedigrees in the 
register." 

Board of Appeals Meeting. 

San FRAM isro, Cal., January 20, 1904. 
A meeting of the Pacific District Board of Appeals 
of the National Trotting Association will be held at 
the office of the Secretary, 3fi Geary street, San 
Francisco, Cal., at 2 o'clock p. m., on Thursday, 
February 18, V.m. 

All communications Intended for consideration of 
thin Board at this meeting must b<- forwarded to the 
Secretary not later than February 4tb. 

F. W. KELLEY, Socretary, 
Pacific District Board of Appeals. 
By otder of E. P. Hkaf.d, Chairman. 



6 




A well-bred McKinney mare is offered for sale. See 
advertisement. 



The Los Angeles Driving Club will hold an after- 
noon of matinee racing to-day. 



It is now reported that the blind stallion Rythmic 
2:06? will go to the auction block. 



Bonnie Direct 2:05} is certain to be a great sire. 
His colts show more finish than those of any other 
son of Direct and they all have speed. 



Bay Leaf by Princess, dam by New York, sold at 
auction once for $30, is the dam of Pat Ford 2:16}, 
and Josie Aegon 2:17}, new ones for 1903. 



Bayswater Wilkes is now located at Woodland. He 
has some of the best looking colts in Yolo county that 
have ever been seen there and will get a good patron- 
age this year. 

The twenty-second biennial congress of the mem- 
bers of the National Trotting Association will con- 
vene at the Murray Hill Hotel on Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 10, 1904. 

The stallion Don Fallis, trial 2:16, is offered for sale 
by an advertiser. Don Fallis is a horse of good siz« 
and handsome proportions and has good earning 
capacity in the stud. 

Joe Corey, who recently removed from Vallejo to 
Pleasanton with his string of horses, is training a 
colt called Spinnaker that is by Gaff Topsail out of 
Easter D., and is a very fast youngster. 



There will be three harness races on the Speedway 
in Golden Gate Park, Sunday, beginningat 11 o'clock. 
The contests will be between horses owned by mem- 
bers of the San Francisco Driving Club. 



Trainer Frank Bogash, of Ft. Wayne, Ind., expects 
to go down the Grand Circuit with a good stable in 
1904 for Spy Run Farm which will contain nothing 
that is not by their stallion Atlantic King 2:09}. 



The get of Nutwood Wilkes that are entered in the 
three year old stakes this year will make quite a 
showing if no accidents happen them. We hear of 
several that are showing remarkable speed already. 



A. H. Anderson presents his advertisement in this 
issue. He is a live stock auctioneer and will conduct 
a general auction business in this city or in any part 
of the State. He has a branch office at Sacramento. 



The five-year-old gelding Don '/.. by Stam B , dam 
by Lottery, that Mr. J. M. Hackett, of Rocklin, Cal., 
bred and raised and is now owned by Mr. J. D. 
Springer, of Pleasanton, is one of the good green 
trotting prospects of the year. 



By some acc'.dent the program for the Pleasanton 
meeting failed to reach us this week, but will doubt- 
less be in time for publication in our next issue. The 
classes will be nearly the same as the Breeders meet- 
ing and the purses range from $100 to $1000. 



Rosebud by General Washington, dam Goldsmith 
Maid 2:14, is entitled to a place in the list of brood- 
mares that have produced four or more trotters that 
have secured standard records. Her four ar6 Regy 
2:26}, Rose Direct 2:29}, Rose Worthy 2:29}, Artus 
2:29}. 

M. J. Zahner, who is training a string of horses at 
Pleasanton, has just received the pacing mare Maud 
W. by Waldstein from Alton, Humboldt county, and 
will train her for the circuit this year. Mr. Zahner 
expects several more horses from Humboldt county 
shortly. 

An advertisement was inserted in the Bkekder 
and Sportsmen recently in which a McKinney colt 
was offered for sale. Among answers to the same re- 
ceived within a couple of weeks was one from a party 
in Winnipeg, Ontario, and another from one in New 
Orleans. 



Of the twenty-six new 2:10 performers ior 1903, six 
of them came from Scott Hudson's stable. Hudson 
is the only driver that has won two $20,000 stakes, 
the Nutmeg Stakes, $20,000, and the Bonner Memor- 
ial, $20,000. Hudson took up about a dozen of his 
horses January 1st. 

Coney 2:02 is now owned by Mr. H. B. Allen, of 
Kansas City, Missouri, who purchased McKinney's 
fastest performer recently while on a trip to New 
York. It is said that Coney will be driven in some of 
the free for all races on the half-mile tracks this 
year by Mr. Allen's wife. 



It pays to breed good ones. R. P. Lathrop, the hay 
merchant of Hollister, bought at the Santa Rosa 
Stock Farm sale June 23, 1903, for $140, the chestnut 
mare Diva by Piedmont 2:17} with a colt at her side 
by L. W. Russell, he by Stamboul, dam By By by 
Nutwood. Mr. Lathrop has just sold the colt to 
Moody Brothers of Elko. Nevada, for $200. The colt 
now is in the hands of Jo Sanches at Hollister, and 
shows great promise. He is level headed and a BO, uare 
trotter. He will be carefully handled and later taken 
to Elko, and be used in the stud. 



Thos. Ronan, proprietor of the Pleasanton track, 
came down to Oakland this week and purchased an 
additional 40,000 feet of lumber to build more stalls 
and make other improvements. Mr. Ronan is finding 
it rather difficult to keep up with the demand for 
stalls but is doing his best. 



The Rural Spirit says "Henry Helman owns a year- 
ling colt by Pete Williams' stallion Monterey that he 
considers a wonder at the trot." Mr. Payne Shafter 
of Olema, Marin county, was in the Breeder and 
Sportsman office last week and has the same story 
to tell." The young Montereys are all right 



C. W. Welby, owner of the fast young pacing stal- 
lion 2:14} by Bay Bird, has taken the horse to Oregon 
and will make the season of 1904 with him at Irving- 
ton track, Portland. There is no better bred stallion 
on the Coast than Yukon. His dam is by Algona and 
his second dam a full sister to Beautiful Bells. 



Scott Hudson and Harry Benedict are jogging 
Twinkle 2:05}; Guy Fortune 2:1]}; Dr. Madara 2:08; 
Tertimin 2:24}, and others preparatory to sorting 
them over for the coming campaign. Tertimin has 
paced well below 2:10 in several races. It will be in- 
teresting to note Twinklo's showing after a year's let 
up- 



George Ramage, who is training a few horses at 
Pleasanton, among them a full sister and brother, 
two and three years oid by Sidney Dillon, has to stop 
nearly every day and answer the question as to 
whether either is for sale. The gelding is just about 
the cleanest gaited trotter that steps over the 
Pleasanton track. 

One of the best bred youngsters in California is the 
stallion Alta Vista that is in J. R. Albertson's string 
at Pleasanton. He is by McKinney out of the great 
race mare Kxpressive 2:124 by Electioneer. He is a 
big handsome four-year-old and will be trained for 
the races and a record this year. He should make a 
great stock horse. 

At the convention of the Cycle State Board of 
Trade held in Oakland on Wednesday evening of 
this week, W. J. Keaney, the well known sulky builder 
of this city, was elected President of the Board for 
the third term. After his election the members of 
the Board presented Mr. Kenney with a handsome 
gold watch and chain. 



George Leavitt, the Boston horseman, says that 
the great broodmare Maggie H. by Homer, should be 
given credit for the mare Gayety Girl 2:15', by Red 
Wilkes. The Year Book does not give the breeding 
of her dam, but Mr. Leavitt, who purchased the 
mare in Kentucky, says that he is confident that the 
breeding given above is correct. 



Mr. Henry Scott, of San Jose, haB a two-year-old 
by Owyhee 2:11, out of the producing mare Primrose 
by Sidney, that is one of the most promising young 
trotters in Santa Clara county. Last year as a 
yearling he trotted a quarter in 40 seconds after 
being hitched up a few times. He will be put in train- 
ing again this year for a short time. 



J. B. Stetson of Boise, Idaho, will move to Port- 
land, Oregon, to train his horses and has engaged 
stalls at Irvington track. He has in his string that 
good four year old Swift B. by Stam B, that took a 
record of 2:16} last year as a three-year-old, Oregon 
Maid 2:14^, Del Norte (2) 2:243, Monroe S. 2:13}, Geta- 
way 2:24} and several horses without records. 



Birdman, the roan three-year-old colt by Antrim 
out of Birdie by Jay Bird, that is owned by Geo. A. 
Kelly of Pleasanton, promises to be one of the good 
colt trotters of the year. Mr. Kelly's colt Bonnie 
McK. by McKinney out of Bonsilene 2:14} is another 
good prospect. This is a wonderfully well bred fellow 
as his second dam is Bon Bon, the dam of Bonnie 
Direct 2:05}. 

The McCarty sale, to be held at Portland, March 
1st, 2d and 3d, is attracting great attention all 
through the Northwest and a number of high class 
horses have already been consigned to it. Well bred 
California horses should bring good money at this 
■ale and we advise owners to open correspondence 
with J. L. McCarthy & Son, Room 8, Hamilton Build- 
ing, Portland, in regard to consignment. 



L. V. Harkneas will own as many broodmares at 
Walnut Hall Farm, if he keeps collecting, as there 
ever were at Palo Alto, Recently he secured ten 
matrons, paying therefore $11,000, from F. M. Buck, 
Fairbault, Minn. Among them are the dam of Lady 
Constantino 2 12$, the dam of Clovia 2:13}; Krem 
Marie 2:10} and some other royally bred and record 
mares. He now owns about 200 broodmares. 



Manager G. A. Wahlgreen of the Overland track, 
Denver, Col., reports the outlook for the racing season 
in Colorado as most encouraging. The regular meet- 
ing will commence at Overland Park on June 18th 
and conclude on July 4th. There will be two harness 
and five running races each day, and two $1500 and 
six $1000 stakes for trotters and pacers will be an- 
nounced soon. The regular purses will be $500 each. 



Many of the old time Morgans were long-lived 
horses, and some of the present day seem to have 
inherited the qualities upon which longevity depends. 
We learn from the successful starting judge James 
Walker, of Coldwater, Mich., that his Morgan stal- 
lion, Royal Fearnaught, now 31 years old, is hale, 
hearty, vigorous and frisky. His grandsire, Young 
Morrill 2:31, lived to be 32 years old. — American Horse 
Breeder. 



[January 23, 1904 



The mare Explosion by Steinway, dam Flash by 
Egmont, that Henry Dunlap is training at Pkasan- 
ton, is showing lots of speed. All the produce of 
Flash are aftlicted with the same disease. Mr. T. J. 
Crowley, of this city, purchased for a friend in San 
Francisco a year ago at Oakwood Park Farm a geld- 
ing by Chas. Derby, out of Flash, that is now used 
as a road horse and can show a quarter close to 30 
seconds without training. 



Henry H. Helman, who came down from Portland, 
Oregon, to attend the final Palo Alto sale, tells us 
that he has sold his promising green trotter Rov 
Benton to Ed Dyer of Spokane for $2000. Roy Ben- 
ton is by Benton Boy and his dam is Antera by 
Anteeo. With very little work last spring Roy Ben- 
ton worked a mile in 2:18 and trotted quarters fast 
enough to assure Mr. Helman that he is a 2:10 trotter. 
He will be trained this year by Lou Childs and raced 
on the North Pacific Circuit. 



Representatives of the Canadian Horse Breeders 
Association waited upon the government last week 
and urged that, in the interest o f pure-bred stock, 
the customs duty on horses entering Canada from the 
United States be raised to $30 on animals of the value 
of $150 and under. The association claims that in- 
ferior horses are brought in on spurious pedigrees 
and thus work great harm to native breeds. A 
meeting of the representatives of live stock inteiests 
has been called by the government, and the date is 
set for March at Ottawa. 



The proprietor of the Breeder and Sportsman 
received a letter this week from a relative "way down 
in Maine," who says that at the town of Gardner, a 
mile track has been scraped on the ice of the Kenne- 
bec river, and that racing is to be held during the 
winter. The prizes are 50 bushels of oats for the first 
horse, 25 bushels for thesecond and 10 bushels for the 
third. Horses with (peed can evidently earn their 
oats in Maine even in the cokle t weather. 



Willis Parker of Stockton, Cal., who has bred and 
owned quite a number of standard trotters, visited 
his old home in Maine a few weeks ago and while in 
Waterville met C. H. Nelson, breeder and owner of 
the stallion Nelson 2:09, who invited him to take a 
ride behind the old champion. Although 22 years 
old this spring the son of Young Rolfe stepped out 
like a horse in training and Mr. Parker says ne seems 
to have as much speed as he ever did when allowed to 
brush a short distance and certainly enjoys it. 



Mr. E. D. Dudley of Dixon, Solano county, pur- 
chased at the recent Palo Alto sale the yearling 
chestnut colt by Nutwood Wilkes 2:162, dam Palita 
by Palo Alto 2:08ij, second dam Elsie by Gen. Benton, 
third dam Elaine by Messenger Duroc and fourth 
dam Green Mountain Maid, dam of Electioneer. Mr. 
Dudley has claimed the name Palite for this colt, 
which was one of the best bargains of the sale as well 
as one of the best bred colts in this country or any 
other. Palite should make a great stock horse, as he 
is a grand individual. 

Several weeks ago when the Earl of Lonsdale was 
visiting San Francisco, be called at the Harness and 
Saddlery depot of the Jepsen Bros. Company and 
purchased two fine California hair bridles at $75 
each, one of which he intends to present to Queen 
Alexandra. The Earl also purchased from the same 
fTrm a wbole wagon load of articles of California 
manufacturre consisting of silver bits, spurs, rawhide 
bridles, riatas, quirts, hair ropes, several saddles and 
many other things with which to please and astonish 
his friends when he reaches home. 



Earl Medium, one of the successful sons of Happy 
Medium, died recently, the property of R. E. God- 
dard, Burgin, Ky., who purchased him early in 1903. 
Though never so situated that he was in the way of 
making a reputation, Earl Medium sired tix standard 
performers, of which five beat 2:20 and three had 
records better than 2:15, as follows: Maybud 2:13}, 
Kanawha Star 2:14}, Tom Martin 2:14}, all pacers. 
He was bred at Fairlawn, and was out of the Almont 
mare France6ca, who also produced I. Direct 2:12i, 
Sable Frances 2:15}, and Guvcisca 2:26. 



The horses which Mr. Lou Robertson of Auckland 
purchased in Kentucky last fall and shipped to Auck- 
land from this city December 31st, were a six-year- 
old stallion by Bow Bells, dam Russia 2:29; two-year- 
old stallion by Birchwood, dam Marks Maid; five- 
year-old mare Bodeau by Bow Bells dam Myrth by 
The King; three-year-old mare by Heir at Law, dam 
Conway; two-year-old mare by Birchwood, d^m Vera 
Capel. While there were no very striking individuals 
in this lot, they wereall well bred and will be valuable 
additions to the trotting stock of the antipodes. 



J. Y. Gatcomb, former partner of Scott Hudson,, 
now located at his home in Concord, N. H , has pur- 
chased at a reputed price of $8,000 from R. H. Plant, 
Macon, Ga., the three year old bay filly Grace Bond 
bv The Bondsman, dam Grace Boyd by Ashland 
Wilkes 2:17}. Grace Bond won the two year old 
division of the Kentucky Futurity last year, beating 
Bessie Benyon, Alta Axworthy, Bequeath, The Her- 
mit, Alice Edgar, and California Cresceus. She took 
a mark in that race of 2:17:}. She also won the Lex- 
ington stakes, beating about the same field, and scor- 
ing a mark, her present record of 2:14}. Her only 
defaat was in the Horse Review purse at Oakley, 
where she won the first heat in 2:14^, and was 
defeated by Alta Axworthy, who she later defeated 
in the Futurity. From the manner in which she won 
her stake engagements last year, many predict that 
she will repeat Fereno's record by winning also the 
three year old division of the Kentucky Futurity this 
year. 



January 23, 1904, 



falls gvccbcv onfc &p0vteman 



Interfering, Striking, Cutting or Brushing in 
Horses. 



Of the many faults, accidents or habits to which 
horseflesh is heir, "interfering" is one of the most 
troublesome. Fortunately, however, it is ono that 
admits of a large measure of prevention, and the ill- 
effects of it can be to a very considerable extent over- 
come. In the consideration of this subject one of the 
most important points to thoroughly study is the 
causes. Of the somewhat numerous inlluences which 
contribute to this fault, defective conformation is a 
very important one in predisposing to it. It is im- 
portant from the fact that cases that are largely the 
result of defective formation are the most difficult to 
successfully cope with. A horse of perfect formation 
of limbs should raise, advance and put down his feet 
approximately in a straight line in the act of progres- 
sion, in the walk or trot. Any deviation inwards 
from the straight line renders a horse liable to strike 
if any exciting cause is brought into operation. 

Narrow horses, particularly if they are leggy, are 
apt to go close both behind and in front, and conse- 
quently to "brush." Those that "toe out,"eithor in 
the hind or fore extremities, usually wind inwards in 
progression, and are consequently apt to interfere. 
In fact, there is no formation of limb that so strongly 
predisposes to this fault, in its most aggravated form, 
as the defect just mentioned. Horses as a rule that 
"toe in" in the fore limbs wind outwards, and conse- 
quently show no disposition to "brush." In such 
cases the "turning in" of the toes is due to the posi- 
tion in which the leg is fixed onto Ihe body. It is due 
to the back part of the leg showing a tendency to 
turn outwards from the body. This can be most 
clearly observed at the elbow in the front leg where 
the point inclines outwards. "Toeing in, " however, 
is not al wars the result of a malposition of the limb 
throughout, for sometimes the deformity is confined 
to that portion of it from the fetlock down, consti- 
tuting what might be called a "club foot." This for- 
mation often predisposes to "striking" to a marked 
degree, as in progression the foot comes very close to 
the opposite limb. In spite of the predisposition 
many horses show to interfering, from defective for- 
mation, such animals may be seen working month 
after month without inflicting any injury to them- 
selves. 

Horses that are in good condition, well balanced in 
going, and that have complete power of co-ordinating 
the movements of their limbs, are the ones that are 
likely to escape the not infrequent consequences of 
defective formation of limb. The exciting causes of 
interfering are numerous, but the one one hears most 
frequently spoken of is defective shoeing, and it is no 
doubt sometimes a cause, but not nearly so frequently 
as is sometimes supposed. The unfortunate shoer is 
frequently maligned for what is no fault of his. It 
does not matter how some horses areshod, or whether 
they are shod or not, they will interfere under some 
circumstances. 

The best that we can do in the way of shoeing is to 
use a good rational shoe, properly applied on a suit- 
ably prepared foot. Too heavy a shoe will sometimes 
act as a cause from the excessive weight, taxing the 
muscular control of the limb unduly, so that during 
quick movements and sharp turns "striking" is par- 
ticularly apt to occur. Leaving the hoofs too large 
is sometimes a cause, from the simple consequence of 
its bringing the hoof closer to the opposite lep. Not 
only that, but the increased length of the toe result- 
ing from too large a hoof intensifies the tendency to 
"cut' 

The first step, then, in the attempt to prevent 
striking, is to reduce the wall to reasonable dimen- 
sions with the rasp. Defects of the form and direc- 
tion of hoof may sometimes be remedied in a measure; 
as, for instance, take a horse that "toes out," at d 
shorten the outer part of the toe to a greater extent 
than the inner, the tendency is not only to correct 
the unsightliness of the deformity, but also to remedy 
in a measure its ill-consequence in progression. The 
same may be done, but just in the opposite way, in 
horses which "toe in." In the hind legs it is gener- 
ally the inner part of the tee of the hoof that inflicts 
the injury. This can be rasped so as to reduce its 
convex form to an approaoh to a straight line with 
the rasp, which lessens somewhat the danger. The 
shoe should be of reasonable weight (strong enough 
to keep It from breaking) and set in as much as possi- 
ble on the inside without running too much risk of 
bruising the sole. Have the inside branch of the 
shoe narrow and rounded, so that there will be as 
little daDger of inflicting injury as possible. The 
nails may also be withheld from the inside of the toe, 
bo that no injury may be done from the clinches. It 
is a good plan to also shorten the Inside of the hoof 
more than the outside, and compensate for this by 
deepening the inside branch of the shoe, so as to keep 
the foot level and have even bearing. The inside 



branch of the shoe may be made almoststraight from 
the toe back, and the hoof made to correspond pretty 
much in form. The following out of this plan of 
shoeing will minimize the likelihood of injury being 
done by striking. 

The weighting of the shoe on the outside Is often 
recommended by having the outer branch consider- 
ably heavier than the inner one, with the idea that 
the weight on the outside makes a horse go wider. 
This would, no doubt, be the tendency, and provid- 
ing it does not increase tho weight of the shoe too 
much there is no objection to it. 

Another plan sometimes followed is to raise the in- 
side of the foot higher than the outside, with the idea 
that the fetlock of the leg on the ground will bo 
thrown oufvards, and thus be more likely to escape 
injury from the opposite foot. This plan is irrational, 
from the fact that it causes a horso to tread unevenly, 
and thus tend to result in injury to some other part 
of the leg, disturbing the relations of the various 
parts that maKe up the weight-bearing column. 

In the front legs a three-quarter shoe is sometimes 
used, the shoe only coming half way round on the in. 
side and not covering tho ground surface of the inner 
quarter. The difficulty about this plan is getting the 
shoe so applied that all the wall will boar its normal 
amount of weight. It doesn't do to leave the inner 
quarter unsupported, for in that case there will be 
tilting of the leg inwards when the foot is put on the 
ground, or, in other words, uneven treading, with 
the ill consequences already explained. 

Charlier shoes sometimesdo very well and are much 
safer than a three-quarter shoe. This is a light, 
narrow webbed shoe, that enly comes half way round 
on either side of the hoof and is sunken in to a groove 
cut out of the plantar surface of the wall, so that the 
lower surface of it is just flush with the quarters that 
are not grooved out. By this plan there is an even 
bearing surface all round the hoof, a light shoe, and 
one no more likely to cause injury to the opposite leg 
than the natuk-al unshod hoof. Tho drawback about 
this shoe for general use on hard roads is that it has 
not strength enough to form a substantial stay to the 
hoof. It also lessens the action, and horses are apt 
to go sore with them on very hard roads. 

It is questionable if we have a much better device 
for shoeing interfering horses than the rubber pads 
now so generally in use in cities. Their use has a 
tendency to prevent interfering by virtue of their 
effect in preventing slipping, which is one of the ex- 
citing causes of this trouble. In the hind legs where 
"cutting" Is most usual, the inner and back part of 
the fetlock is the common seat of injury. Occasionally 
in horses with a good deal of hock action they will 
strike the leg higher up, and in very low, close going 
horses the inside of the coronet is scraped. 

In the front legs the injury may be anywhere from 
the fetlock to the knee. When it is high up it 
generally gets thedesignation of speedy cut. Another 
cause of "striking" is fatigue. It has already been 
pointed out that when a horso has not perfect control 
of his legs he is apt to "brush," so that horses that 
have not had regular work and good feed for a length 
of time, or, in other words, are not in pood condition, 
are easily fatigued, and consequently liable to in- 
terfere. 

The uneven footiDg of rough roads, slippery roads 
or pavements, the swaying of a two-wheeler, are all 
circumstances likely to interfere with a horse's equil- 
ibrium, and conseqiently are not infrequently excit- 
ing causes of "striking." 

Another very fertile exciting cause, particularly in 
cities, and one which, strange to say, is never reforrtd 
to in print, is the influence of discomfort in connectu n 
with the mouth in causing "interfering. " There is 
nothing that puts a horse out of balance more com- 
pletely than anything wrong with his mouth. Horses 
that cross their jaws, open their mouths, put their 
tongues out, or over their bits, carry their heads side- 
ways, fuss with their bits, slobber, pull, etc., genei - 
rlly have some soreoess of the mouth caused by their 
bits, and if they are at all predisposed are vory 
apt to "cut " We see examples of this every day in 
citios whore dealers get horses from the country that 
have chiefly been used to snafllo bits. They at once 
begin to drive them with curb bitp, and they nearly 
all show some discomfort at thechangein the various 
ways already mentioned, In addition to which there is 
"pulling out " and "crowding" in double harness. It 
la very common to s- e a horsecut hislega badly under 
such circumstances that shows no evidence of ever 
having struck before. The treatmen t of "interfering " 
resolves itself largely into methods of prevention. 
The most important point is to remove the cause, 
where practicable, and if not, to endeavor to neutral- 
ize its operation as much as possible. 

If a horso is in danger of "striking" himself from 
the mouth not being in proper order, or from any ex- 
citing cause remaining in operation, protect the part 
or parts with a boot or boots that aro likely to be in- 



Tf 

jured. If any part is Injured from "cutting" keep 
that part protected until it has entirely recovered 
from effects of injury. 

In a large majority of cases after a horse Is in good 
condition, bis mouth well m de, and ho is properly 
shod, there will be no need for boots, unless he is 
likely to bo subjected to some exciting cause, or unless 
he Is markedly predisposed from defective formation. 
— American Sj,,,, t.omt,,. 

Leading ;:i5 Sires. 

The S:U list is already a large one, containing many 
hundreds of trotUrs and pacers. But the difficulty 
of breeding them with any approach to certainty is 
accentuated by an examination of the list under their 
sires. Only seven stallions so far have succeeded in 
siring twenty-five or moro such performers, viz.: 

*IS «:I0 

. . „ list. lint 

Alcantara 2:23 by George Wilkes 2:22 31 6 

Baron Wilkes 2:18 by George Wilkes 2:22 20 I] 
Onward 2:251 by George Wilkes 2:22 " " 27 10 
GambettaWilkes2:I91byGeo. Wilkes2-22 27 I" 
Brown Hal 2:124 by Tom Hal Jr. . . . "27 H 

McKlnney 2:1 1J by Alcyone 2:27 27 8 

Simmons by George Wilkes 2:22 9<j 2 

All belong to the Wilkes family except Brown Hal, 
whose entire list are pacers. Five are sons of George 
Wilkes, and the sixth, McKlnney, is a grandson, be- 
ing sired by Alcyone 2:27, the brother of Alcantara, 
who heads tho list with the largest total of trotters 
and pacers. Three are bred in the same way— George 
Wilkes crossed on Mambrino Patchen mares. Mc- 
Kinney's sire is of this same blood, and Onward 's dam 
is Dolly by Mambrino Chief, the sire of Mambrino 
Patchen. The odd Wilkes sta Hon is Gambetta 
Wilkes, a remarkable sire but principally confined to 
fast pacers. The fact that McKinney is of a younger 
generation than the other horses in this list shows 
what a remarkable sire he is. 

Strike!— if they don't give you Jackson's Napa 
Soda when you ask for it. 

VETERINARY DEPARTMENT? 

CONDUCTED BY 
WM. F. EGAN, M. R. C. V. C, F. E. V. M. S. 

•^Subscribers to this paper can have advice through these columns 
In all cases of sick or Injured horses, cattle or dogs bv sending a 
a ^ eSCri ?t i0 . D S f th0 C8se ' Applicants will send their name 
and address that they may be identified. 

Oakland, January 15, 1904. 

Ed. Breeder and Sdortsman:— What shall I do 
for a thrifty weanling which is showing signs of dis- 
temper, swelling under the throat: is also troubled 
with pin worms. I have her in the city and have no 
P a,ture - Respectfully, J. W. S. 

Answer— As distemper and glanders are somewhat 
similar in their symptoms, and you are within reach 
of a veterinary surgeon, I would ad vise you to consult 
with one. Glanders is a disease that is very danger- 
ous, being contagious to man, and almost always 
fatal. The general treatment for distemper consists 
of placing the colt in a comfortable, well ventilated, 
but not draughty stall, giving soft nourishing focd, 
poulticing the swollen glands and throaf, and in the 
fine part of the day allowing him to stand where the 
sunshines. Blanket him, if tho stable is cold. If he 
be discharging from the nose, do not let him drink 
from the same trough, or vessel, that other horses 
drink from until you are sure that he has not got tho 
glanders. 



EFFECTUAL 

The moM effectual remedy in use for 
the cure of ailments of horses and cattle ii 

GOMBAIJLT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 



Used as a Blister 
or Lotion. 




This preferred remedy in prepared ex- 
clusively by J. E. Gombault, ex-Veterinary 
Surgeon to the French Government Stud. 



III WW IIIMRDYr . ith.n 

m. *4|irulii«. Nor»- Thrnul, 



It 



ETtry bottle nf I ini.iic lliil.nm «<>M i« 
w«rr»nt<-il to gltt Mllsfarllon, IVIre HI. AO 
per bottle. Sold hy flmirirlftt'. or Jtent l>* <■< 
pre«>. fh»nrr« with full illrcrtlonK forltn 

uw. Benil for ilr.«T-»li»e rtrenlarn, teatlmo- 
nl»l«. ete. AiMreaa 

TBS U WRHC.-WILLms COIPUT, Clareltod, Ohio. 



8 



[January 23, 1804 




ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. De WITT 




Choke Bores, Their Advantages and 
Disadvantages. 

Despite the great advance made within the last 
decade in the science of shotgun ballistics, there is 
still a very great deal to be discovered and explained 
before experts can be said to have thoroughly grasped 
all the laws relating to shooting in the field or at the 
traps. If anything were wanted to prove this, it 
would only be necessary to refer to sporting and ex- 
pert discussion during the last two years, as to what 
really occurs in shooting with a gun that is choke 
bored at the muzzle Choke in a shotgun is an in- 
vention not much more than thirty years old. It is 
still a subject of dispute whether we are indebted for 
its invention to the United States, or to Mr. W. W. 
Greener, of Birmingham, or to Mr. Pape, of New- 
castle. In his lifetime the late Mr. J. D. Dougall, 
senior, of St. Jamcis street, London, accepting the in- 
vention as American in origin, claimed to have been 
the first introdueerof the novelty in England. Nevis 
in the Country (it ntlcman states: "We remember his 
relating to us, as we sat in his London sanctum one 
day in the early seventies, how his eldest son, while 
travelling on business in the United States, came 
across a specimen of a choke bore gun there, and was 
so struck with its shooting powers that he brought 
it home with him to Glasgow and submitted it to his 
father. At that very time, apparently, so far as we 



Pacific Coast Field Trials. 

[By Albert Betz.] 
The twenty-first annual trials of the Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club were run at Bakerefield, Kern 
county, commencing January 11, 1904. The stakes 
were the Derby, with twenty starters; All-Age with 
nineteen, and Members', with five starters. The 
number of starters in the two former stakes were the 
largest in the history of the club. 

The Derby purse amounted to $625, the largest 
ever offered for a similar event by any club in this 
Opinions all differed, then, ft can be seen, as to what country; three silvercup* were the special prizes; 50% 
the particular action is in thechoke that has the ob- of this purse and cup went to first, 30"„ and cup to 
served effect of concentrating the pattern of the second, and 20.<V of the purse was divided between the 
pellets discharged from a choked gun; but until re- 
cently it seemed to be assumed as incontrovertible, 
that the direct action of the choke on the pellets 
themselves in the barrel, and before they left the 
muzzle was the true cause of their closer pattern on 
the target. An additional theory has recently been 
added to these others, and one that, as stated by a 
contemporary, seems very reasonable which is all 



the pressure from behind, the pellets meeting the 
pressure of the air outside the muzzle, the underneath 
pellets being wedged between those in front, owing to 
the greater pressure on them just before they leave 
the barrel, and thus resulting in a lateral spread. 



owners of the dogs awarded equal third. There being 
but one cup for third place, Messrs. Van Arsdale and 
Keller agreed to toss for the cup, the winner to buy a 
similar cup for the loser. Mr. Keller was the lucky 
man. 

The All-Age purse amounted to $400, the prizes 



that can be said of it in the absence of any proof were also three cups; 50",' and cup to first, 30°^ and 



-whatever of its accuracy 

It is known that the powder gases travel nearly 
three times as fast as the shot charge on emerging 
from the muzzle and meeting the resistance of the 
air, that resistance being broken to some extent by 



cup to second, and 20"„ and cup to third. 

In the Members' Stake trophies were awarded to 
first, second and third. 
W. S. Bell of Pittsburg, Pa., judged the trials, and 



the mass of pellets in favor of the traveling gates, showed himself the peer of any judge in America 

There can be no doubt that these fast traveling That his decisions were corect and entirely satisfac- 

columns of gas on emerging from the barrel after the tn . , , ,, ,., "mumm 

pellets have goneout have a scattering influence upon tory t0 ownorf » aDd handlers alike, is evidenced by the 

the shot charge, and which perceptibly spread its fact that it was the unanimous wish of all that he 

pattern. The latest theory is that the choke gets rid would return and judge the club's trials of next year. 



of this disturbing influence, not by its action on the 
shot charge, but on the gas propelling it. That 
result is attempted to be explained in this wise. The 
obstruction of the choke reduces the velocity of the 
shot charge near the muzzle. Thedelayed movement 
of the shot at the choke causes a "piling up" of the 
gases behind the over powder wad, causing these 
gases to rebound backwards against those further 



An invitation was extended him to do 6o; and, while 
he expressed the desire to come, it is yet too early to 
announce definitely his ability to be on hand. 

The extreme dryness, on account of lack of rain, 
greatly hampered the dogs, especially the Derby en- 
tries, in showing to the best advantage. However, 



remember, Mr. Pape had accidently hit upon a similar down the barrel, thus momentarily delaying their enou gh bird work was had to enable the judge to 

arrive at a correct conclusion as to the respective 
merits of the dogs. The young dogs placed in the 
Derby will no doubt be hereafter heard from. The 
All-Age dogs seemed to have less difficulty in locating 



principle in boring, which he was engaged in experi- 
menting with and improving, while Mr. Greener was 
similarly working on the same lines in Birmingham. 
Although Mr. Greener then does not claim to have 
invented choke boring, there can be no question that 
he brought it to perfection, and was the medium of 
popularising the system in this country, having, as 
we all know, beaten all competitors with bis choke 
bores at the gun trials of 1875. In the late seventies 



whole movement and letting the shot charge leave 
the muzzle entirely undisturbed by the powder gas 
behind it, or its pressure on the wadding. This is 
an entire reversal of the theories hitherto current to 
account for the closer shooting of choke bores, as 

given out by the best authorities on the point some birds and some excellent work was done, considering 
years ago. But it is given at a time when knowledge conditions. Lady, winner of first in the All-Age has 
of the laws of ballistics has considerably advanced, for several years been a consistent performer at our 
and it is not inconsistent with the latest information 4 . , , , „ • * ° al uur 

extant obtained. trials and those of the Pacific Northwest; and Kil- 

This new theory, in fact, ascribes to "muzzle blast" garif, placed second, sustained his sensational recoid 




full chokes, experienced by game shooters, to shoot 
too close, and not to the centre. 

Though full chokes became unpopular before the 
eighties in game shooting the discovery of the princi- 
ple of construction has ever since then been invaluable 
to gun makers in giving them that command of 
pattern that previously was more or less dependent 
upon chance in a cylinder gun, even though that 
chance was reduced very materially in the beautifully 
bored guns produced by Manton, Boss, Lancaster, 
Lang, Moore and Purdey, without any idea of choke 
boring as now understood. The driving of game, of 
course, helped the fall of full chokes, even full choke 
in the left barrels, but the principle was merely dor- 
mant during the reaction towards cylinders that 
speedily followed, and it is carried out in its modified 
form today in the best types of what are now termed 
'improved cylinders,' improved by more than a 
suspicion of choke in both barrels, or, at any rate, in 
the loft barrel. The King, in truth, is believed to 
prefer more choke in his left barrel than in his right, 
also an 'improved cylinder,' equal to the tallest 
pheasant shooting. Choke is by no means dead, then, 
even in the highe3t quality of driving guns, and it is 
very much alive and active in the left barrels of the 
cheaper grades of gun, suitable for all round shoot- 
ing." 

Such, then, is the position of choke in shotguns 
for game, giving gunmakers the full command of pat- 
tern Yet to tbis day no one has been able thor- 
oughly to explain the action of the choke as it affects 
the position and arrangement of the pellets leaving 
the muzzle, and their pattern on the manufacturer's 
plate. Kxplanations have been attempted, certainly, 
but unfortunately they all differ. They are at best in 
our present stage of ballistic information mere con- 
jecture, innocent of proof, untested by actual meas- 
urement, owing to its extreme difficulty. The attempt 
was made to solve the obscure problem by Mr. R. W. 
S. Griffith, manager of the Schultze Powder Com- 
pany, in his lecture to the Gunmakers' Association, 
on the subject of shotgun patterns. No one had more 
right to speak as an authority on the subject, for Mr. 
Griffith, as is well known, was the first expert across 
the water, to apply to the shotgun the principles of 
measurement adopted for big guns But on this 
abstruse question of the action of thechoke on the 
pellets Mr. Griffith spoke with some hesitation, as 
merely guessing what occurred inside the barrel from 
the action of the choke on the shot charge, and its 
ascertained results on pattern, of which he bad made 
a painstaking and profound study. Other explana- 
tions havesince been attempted on that of Mr. Griffith, 
who believed that the direction of the shot was turned 
inwards by the choke. One well known authority in- 
dicated the view that the pellets when stayed by the 
choke of the barrel received a violent jerk, which 
opened spaces between them through the first pellets 
recovering from the jerk before those behind, thus 
separating them within an inch of the muzzle which 



charge. It is stated, not unreasonably, that when 
the "muzzle blast" is decreased by a smaller powder 
charge the pattern is improved in all ca6es owing to 
there being no interference with the direct course of 
the pellets in the charge of shot to the target plate. 

It is argued that the very small amount of choke 
in an improved cylinder barrel decreases the "muzzle 
blast" by delaying, as described, the exit of the gases 
from the muzzle, and so getting rid of this upset in- 
fluence with or without the wadding upon the shot 
charge within the first two inches of travel beyond 
the muzzle. 

There is little doubt that improved cylinders are 
more popular with our best shots than what is called 
a true cylinder, more subject as the latter may be to 
vagaries in pattern. These vagaries are now put 
down by suggestion to the powder gases emerging 
from the muzzle occasionally overtaking the wadding, 
and thus spreading wide the pattern to such an extent 
as to spoil the shooting on that particular instance. 

Now, all of this is very interesting to the keen 
shooter, but, like too many other solutions of shooting 
problems, it is not based on absolute evidence leading 
inevitably to one conclusion. The latest view, now- 
ever. has the substance of being not only the most 
ingenious of all, but on the whole the most likely 
ultimately to be found — squaring with known facts in 
connection with the patterns made by various types of 
shotguns and the latest data as to the behavior of a 
shell load shot from a sporting gun, both in the travel 
up the barrel and after it leaves the muzzle of the 
gun. 

If correct, the moral of it all, is: that an improved 
cylinder is the best gun, doing away, as it does, with 
the disadvantages of the true cylinder as well as of 
the full choke, both considerable, though entirely 
different in kind. 

English snipe have been plentiful near Point Arena 
recently. Limit bags have been shot daily by the 
lucky sportsmen who were at the Point. 



A homing pigeon was recently shot by a hunter 
near the Napa Soda Springs. The shooter was after 
wild pigeon, which were numerous in the vicinity. 
The bird shot had around one leg a thin silver band, 
upon one side of which was stamped "J 510," upon 
the other the figure of a pigeon. Wild pigeons will 
now and then flock with tame birds, much to the dis- 
content of the latter, but instances of tame birds con- 
sorting with their wild cousins are somewhat rarely 
recounted. 

Duck and Quail Outfits. 

The demand at Skinner's keeps up for sportsmen's outfits, 
ammunition and guns. A large and new stock of goods bas been 
added to till the demand for hunting suits, rubber boot! and 
hunters' footwear; canvas and folding wooden decoys, gun cases 
and a new design of leather-covered shell boxes. Peters Factory 
Loaded Shells are unequaled. Skinner's place Is 801 Market 



they left in that formation, preventing wedging, or s ' ree V You oan get anything there you need for duck or quail 
deformation outside, occasioned in a true cylinder by mV.i order catalogue ' lf ' ou h » ven * the tlme t0 °° me 



The annual meeting of theclub was held on Wednes- 
day evening, January 13th, a large and enthusiastic 
gathering being present The following ifficers were 
re-elected for the ensuing year: 9V. W. Van Arsuale, 
San Francisco, President; Clinton E. Worden, San 
Francisco, First Vice-President; H. W. Keller, Santa 
Monica, Second Vice-President; Albert Betz, San 
Francisco, Secretary-Treasurer. Executive Commit- 
tee— C. N. Post, Sacramento; W. S. Tevis, Bakers- 
field; John H. Schumacher, Los Angeles; 1\ J. A. 
Tiedematn, San Francisco. W. W. Richards of San 
Francisco was elected the fifth member of the com- 
mittee. 

The following named gentlemen were proposed for 
and elected to membership: C. F. A. Last, Los 
Angeles; Howard B. Smith, Colton; Floyd S. Judah, 
Frank H. Mayer, James S. Brownell, E. A. Mocker 
Walter D.Mansfield, Alexander Hamilton, A Cheese- 
brough' L. O. Kellogg, Mountford Wilson, San Fran- 
cisco; A. G. Park, Hanford; J. Sub Johnson, VUalia; 
C. J. Berry, Selma; Frank Ruhstahler, Sacramento; 
W. E. Gerber, Sacramento; C. A. Wlnship, The 
Palms, Los Angeles county; H. L. Betten, Alameda; 
H. P. Anderson, Los Angeles; E. D. Roberts, San 
Bernardino and Judge W. S. Bell, elected an honorary 
member. 

Amongst those noted present were the following: 
W. W. Van Arsdale, J. M. Kilgarif, P. D. Linvllle, 
Wrr. Dormer, H. T. Payne, Dr. Craig, J. W. FlyDn, 
W. W. Richards and wife, Clinton E. Worden, Albert 
Betz, Mr. Campbell, Frank H. Mayer, San Francisco- 
Judge C. N. Post and J. E. Terry, Sacramento; C. W. 
Coggins, Igerna; H. W. Keller, Santa Monica; John 
H. Schumacher, H. P. AndersoD, C. F. A. La6t, John 
Hauerwass, Los Angeles; A. Abbott, Victoria, B. C.; 
J McDaniels, PasoRobles; Howard B. Smith, Colton ; 
J. F. and Mrs. Elwood, Capt. W. H. McKittrick, Mr. 
Martin, Bakersfield; C. J. Berry, Selma; A. G. Park, 
Hanford; W. B., Fred and Chae. Coutts, Kenwood; 
J. E. Lucas, San Clemente; C. H. Babcock, DelRey; 
Mr. Valencia, Napa; R. M. Dodge, Bakersfield and 
others. One of the most pleasant of the many pleasant 
features of the trials was a luncheon given by Mr. 
Tevis at the Gosford Ranch to members of the club 
and their friends. 

THE DERBY. 

Thedraw for the Derby was had on Sunday evening, 
January 10th. Twenty entries paid the itartlDg fee, 
and the draw resulted as follows, 

CharleB W. Coggins' English Setter dog Sharon 
Boy with H. W. Keller's Setter bitch Sombra. 

J. E. Terry's Setter bitch Countess Lou with B. J. 
Baum's Setter dog Starlight Jr. 

Stockdale Kennels' Pointer dog Cuba's Cottonwood 
with C. W. Cogerins' Setter bitch Ml»s Nelson. 

J W. Considine's Setter bitch Hick's Bab with 
Stockdale Kennels' Pointer dog Cuba's Glenwood. 

T. J. Wattson's Setter dog Star's Rod with C. E. 
Worden's Pointer dog Sandlewood. 

W. B. Coutt's Pointer dog Glen Rose with W. W. 
Van Arsdale's Setter bitch Keepsake. 



January 23, 1904j 



(frit* gJrtfeber Orib £tpcu~temau 



9 



J. W. Considine's Setter dog Hick '9 Lad with 
Stockdale Kennels' Po s nter bitch Fly's Pearl. 

John H. Schumacher's Setter bitch Valita with 
Stockdale Kennels' Pointer bitch Cuba's Ivy wood. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's Setter dog Klamath with 
John H. Schumacher's Pointer dog b'rttuk W. 

Dr. A. T. Leonard's Pointer dog Wallace Hruce 
with Alexander Hamilton's Setter dog Lady's Lad. 

Monday, January 11, 1904.— The first brace 
Sharon Boy-Sombra, were cast off at 9:45 a. M., in 
open territory, with fairly good cover, and whore 
birds had been located by the ridere. Sonibra showed 
best in pace and range, and kept up pace to end o( 
the heat. Sharon Boy seemed logy and spiritless. 
Both missed opportunities to point, after birds had 
been driven from trees in which they sought refuge 
after being flushed. Ordered up at 10:40. Sharon 
Boy handled by J. E. Lucas; Sombra by W. B. Coutts. 

Countess Lou-Starlight Jr. — Down at II. in a field 
east of where former brace was run. Neither showed 
much pace or range, the bitch, however, probably 
having the better of it in that respect. No bird work 
was done, and they wereordered up at 11:30. Countess 
Lou handled by Coutts; Starlight Jr. by Lucas. 

Cuba's Cottonwood-Miss Nelson — Down at 11:55, in 
a field designated by the Judge as the "Cat" field, 
where cover was rank. Shortly after being put down 
Cottonwood Hushed a bevy, the birds scattering, but 
neither dog located, though birds were raised by the 
spectators on ground over which dogs had run. Both 
were good goer9, but of restricted range. Up at 12:40. 
Cottonwood handled by R. M. Dodge; Miss Nelson by 
Lucas. 

Lunch was partaken of at the Gosford Ranch; and 
after a drive of several miles to the "Mule" field, the 
next brace 

Hick's Bab-Cuba's Glenwood, was cast off at 2:40, 
in good cover and where birds were known to be. 
This was a nice going pair, Bab having the better 
style and, possibly, being wider in range. After 
running some time without finding birds, the railroad 
track was crossed and the first bird work of the day 
was had. Glenwood was first to find, pointing a small 
bevy, and was backed by Bab. Both dogs were 
steady to shot. Glenwood made two more points 
before ordered up, and was steady to shot and wing. 
He clearly excelled in bird work. Bab flushed several 
birds which she should have pointed. Up at 3:25. 
Glenwood handled by Dodge; Bab by Lucas 

Sandlewood not being on the ground the next 
brace 

Glen Rose-Keepsake, were put down at 3:30 on same 
groucd. Keepsake is probably the most diminutive 
Setter ever seen in trials, yet, notwithstanding, she 
is fast and rangy. The Pointer, also showed speed, 
style and range, and was the better in bird work, 
although both ran over birds Keepsake was first to 
come to point, but was ordered on by her handler; 
a moment afterwards the birds she had been pointing 
were flushed by spectators. Glen Rose made in all 
three points during the heat and in each instance was 
stead y to either shot or wing. He bad the better of 
tha heat. Up at 4:10. Glen Rose handled by Chas 
Coutts; Keepsake by Babcock. This was the last 
brace of the day. 

Tuesday, January 12. -Star's Rod-Sandlewood— 
Down at 9:25 in good open ground with fine cover. 
Both ranged well, but ran over birds which should 
have been pointed. After running some time Sandle- 
wood came to point, nicely backed by Rod, but no 
bird was found. Ordered up at 10 Star's Rod 
handled by Coutts; Sandlewood by Lucas. 

Hick's L id-Fly '9 Pearl— Down at 10:05 Lad was 
best in range and speed, and soon after being cast off 
ranged into timber which was the last seen of him. 
Pearl's Fly, rather restricted in range, continued on 
to end of heat, and although taken to ground over 
which birds had scattered failed to locate. Up at 
10:45. Hick's Lad handled by Coutts; Fly's Pearl by 
Dodge. 

Valita-Cuba's Ivy wood — Down at 11, on grounds 
not before used. Shortly after being put down the 
riders Hushed a bevy of bird9 from dense tumble- 
weeds onto open ground with short cover, where 
Valita soon came to point; bird flushed and she was 
stsa 1 y to wing. Ivywood next pointed on bank of 
roadbed, backed by Valita; both steady to shot. Ivy- 
wood made two more points, one of which she left 
and bird was later flushed. Both missed opportuni- 
ties. Up at 11:40. Valita, a stylish bitch, was 
handled by Coutts; Ivy wood by Dodge. 

Klamath-Erank W.— Cast off in field adjoining 
where last brace bad been worked. Immediately 
after being placed down both took after rabbits and 
it was some time before they could be brought in. 
A*ide from several more rabbit chases nothing was 
done, although toward the latterend of the heat both 
had opportunities on birds. Both ranged well, and 
Klamath is exceptionally stylish. Klamath handled 
by Babcock; Frank W. by Lucas. A short drive was 
then made to Gosford 's ranch and lunch partaken of. 

Wallace Bruce-Lady's Lad — Down at 2 i\ M. A 
nice going pair, ranging well and showing speed, Lad 
being specially stylish. Both had opportunities on 
birds which had been scattered by spectators and 
were lying in good cover, though no bird work was 
done. Lad twice came to point, no bird in either 
case, however, being raised. Bruce handled by 
Lucas; Lady's Lad by Coutts. 

This was the last brace of first series and Judge 
Bell announced that the following dogs would be 
carried Into the second, viz.: Sombra-Cuba's Glen- 
wood; Hick's Bab-Glen Rose; Keepsake-I vy wood. 

SECOND SERIES. 

Sombra-Cuba's Glen wood— Do wn at 3:10. Both 
dogs ranged well. A bevy of birds was flushed from 
bare ground into a cornfield and along a dry ditch, 
and when dogs were carried across to where birds 
were, Glenwood was the first to find, making two 
stylish points on edge of ditch, being steady to shot. 
Sombra also found, was backed by Glenwood, and 
both were steady. Each made several more points. 
Soraora is a very stylish bitch and will no doubt be 
later heard from. Up at 3:55. 



Hick's Bab-Glen Rose— Cast off at 4:30 in corn field 
where birds had been flushed by spectators before 
brace was put down. Cover fairly good. Glen Rose 
was easily the best of the brace ami made one nice, 
steady point, the only bird work of the heat. Many 
birds wore flushed by spectators from ground where 
dogs had worked. Seemingly they could not locate. 
Uu at 4:45. 

Keepsake-Cuba's Ivywood — Down at 4:50 In same 
field where former brace worked, later being worked 
across ditch into adjoining field where birds had 
flown. Keepsake showed best in range, speed and 
style, but was outclassed by Ivywood in bird work, 
the latter making no less than live points in the heal 
to the former's one. Both ran over birds and each 
was somewhat inclined to cha6e, unless cautioned by 
handler. Up at 5:05. 

Returning to the wagons which had been left on 
other side of fence, Judge Bell announced the winners 
as follows: 1st. Stockdale Kennel's Cuba's Glen wood ; 
2d. Sumo Kennel's Cuba's Ivywood; Equal 8di H 
W. Keller's Sombra: W. W. Van Arsdale's Keepsake. 

ALL- AO E STAKE. 

The drawing for All-Age Stake, In which there 
were nineteen starters, was held on Tuesday evening, 
January 12, and resulted as follows: 

C. E. Worden's Setter dog Harry H. w'th same 
owner's Pointer bitch Pearl's Jingle. • 

W. W. Van Arsdale's Setter dog Detroit Joe with 
C. E. Worden's Setter dog Jay M. 

J. E. Terry's Setter dog Kilgarif with W. W. Van 
Arsdale's Setter dog Oakley's Pride. 

J. W. Considine's Setter bitch Policy Girl with W. 
W. Van Arsdale's Setter dog McCloud Boy. 

Stockdale Kennels' Pointer bitch Margarette with 
J. W. Flynn's Pointer bitch Nellie Bang. 

Stockdale Kennels' Pointer dog Cuba's Zep with 
W. W. Van Arsdale's Setter dog California Bell Boy. 

J. W. Considine's Setter bitch Count's Clip with 
Stockdale Kennels' Pointer bitch Midget. 

Stockdale Kennels' Pointer bitch Petronella with 
A. H. Nelson's Setter bitch Sport's Destiny. 

J. W. Considine's Setter bitch Count's Peg with 
Stockdale Kennel's Pointer dog Cuba Jr. 

J. E. Terry's Lady, a bye — 

Wednesday, January 13— Harry H. -Pearl's 
Jingle — Down at 9:20. Harry showed great range, 
speed and stylo, while the biteh was slow, improving 
in pace and range toward latter part of heat. Jingle 
was flrst to find, pointing a bevy which flushed wild, 
she being steady to wing, and scattered in good cover. 
Sbe made four more good points and was steady to 
shot and wing, while Harry H. running over same 
ground was unable to locate. Up at 10. Harry H. 
handled by Coutts; Jingle by Lucas. 

Detroit Joe-Jay M. — Down at 10:10, in large open 
field. Both showed excellent range and speed, 
although, like last year, Detroit Joe could not resist 
the temptation to chase rabbits. Both hud oppor- 
tunities on scattered birds but failed to locate. Up at 
10:40. Detroit Joe handled by Babcock; Jay M. by 
Lucas. 

Kilgarif-Oakley 's Pride — Down at 11:05 in alfalfa 
field, adjoining cornfield where birds bad been driven. 
Kil showed great range and good speed going to ex- 
treme outer end of field before dogs were brough 1 into 
cornfield where birds lay. Each dog made two points 
and was steady to wing and shot. Kilgarif showed 
up the better of the two and demonstrattd that he 
had not deteriorated from his Derby form. Up at 
11:35. Kilgarif handled by Coutts; Oakley's Pride by 
Babcock. 

Policy Girl-McCloud Boy — Down at 11:45, in field 
adjoining where last brace had run. Both fast and 
wide rangers. Going down bank of dry ditch Mc- 
Cloud Boy whirled into a snappy bevy point, but was 
a trifle unsteady to shot. The birds flushed into an- 
other field, and although dogs were taken to place 
where birds had been marked, no further point work 
was done. Policy Girl pointed twice, but no birds 
were found. Birds were af-tor wards raised by follow- 
ers on ground over which dogs had run Up at 12:20. 
Policy Girl handled by Lucas; McCloud Boy by 
Babcock. 

Margaretto-Nellie Bang — First brace down after 
lunch at 1:55. Margarette shortly came to point and 
was nicely backed by Nellie, a rabbit being raised. 
Margarette again pointed and was steady to shot. 
Nellie pointed, but moved on, and later came to stop. 
She excelled in style, speed and range. Just before 
being ordered up Margarette made another point and 
was steady. Up at 2:27. Margarette handled by 
Dodge; Nellie Hang by Coutts. 

Cuba's Zep-Califomia Bell Boy— Down at 2:32. Bell 
Boy was the more stylish and ranged better, being 
first '.o find, the birds fluihing. Working on scat- 
tered birds Bell Hoy made several good points; Zep 
came to point several times, hut no birds were found. 
Later, however, he found and was stead v to shot. 
Bell Boy had best of heat. Up at 3:15. Cuba's Zep 
handled by Dodge; Bell Boy by Babcock. 

Count's Clip-Midget — Down at 3:37. Clip showed 
best rango and speed, and was more stylish, while 
Midget excelled in bird work, making three good 
points, one a bevy point in good cover, and being 
steady to shot. Clip pointed and was nicely backed 
by Midget, the former being somewhat ursteady to 
shot. Up at 4:10. Count's Clip handled by Coutts; 
Midget by Carlyle. 

Petronella-Sport's Destiny— Down at 4:27, in field 
across road from where former brace had run. Birds 
were lying in sunflower patch and were roaded by 
both dogs uhtil they flushed Into field where covor 
was low and dense. Both showed excellent range and 
speed. Each had many opportunities to point. 
Petronella madn three good points, being backed by 
Destiny, but was a trifle unsteady. Destiny several 
times came to point, but no b'rds could be raised. 
She was a numlwr of times backed bv Petronella, who 
showed an inclination to break in. Up at 6, and last 
brace of the day. Petronella handled by Dodge; 
Destiny by Lucas. 



Thursday, January 14— Although an early start 
was made, owing to the fog, the flrst brace of tb.- 
morning 

Count's Peg-Cuba Jr. was not put down until 10:68, 
in large open field. Peg showed best in range and 
speed, but though taken on ground where birds had 
been marked down she failed to locate. Cuba Jr. 
had two points to his credit, being steady to wing and 
shot, on one of which he was backed by Peg. Both 
missed opportunities. Up at 11:43. Coui.t's Peg 
handled by Lucas; Cuba Jr. by Dodge. 

Lady (a bye)— Cast off at 11:48, In large open field. 
Lady at once showed the classy bitch she is, ranging 
out for nearly a mile, yet being always under perfect 
command. Returning from her long cast she came to 
a stylish, snappy point on a single which bad been 
marked down by spectators. Being ordertd an by 
handler the bird flushed, but she was steady to wing. 
This was her only work on birds, but her performance 
was of such character that many of the onlookers 
picked her as the coming winner. W. B. Coutts, 
handler. 

This was the last of the first series; and after par- 
taking of a bountiful luncheon provided by Mr. Tevis 
for members and their friends, the Judge announced 
the following dogs carried into second series: Harry 
H -Jay M.; Kilgarlf-MoCloud Boy; California Bell 
Boy -Mid get; Cuba Jr. -Lady. 

Harry H.-Jay M.— Down at 2:20, on grounds across 
track from "Mule" field. Harry showed speed, style 
and great range, excelling in these respects, though 
both were unfortunate in not finding birds. Up at 
3 p. M. 

Kilgarlf-McCloud Boy— Down at 3:14 in same field 
near railroad track, finally being worked across track 
to where birds had been located Ki) was first 
to find, pointing a bevy, and followed with three 
more points, being steady to shot and wing. Mc- 
Cloud Boy also came to point, and moved on as bird 
was running, finally coming to stop when bird was 
flushed. Kilgarif excelled in range and speed and 
showed excellent judgment in locating birds. Up at 
3:27. 

California Bell Boy-Midget— Down at 3:46. Bell 
Boy was best in range, speed and style, though Mid- 
get also ranged well and showed good speed, and was 
better in bird work, making two good points and 
being steady to shot and wing. Up at 4:07. 

Cuba Jr. -Lady — Down at 4:27 in field adjoining 
Canfield schoolhouse. Lady was first to locate and 
pointed bevy, the bird * flushing into open field where 
both dogs made a number of good snappy points, 
being steady to shot and wing, and stanch backers. 
Lady showed best in range, speed and style, and veri- 
fied the morning's prediction. Up at 4:45. 

Judge Hell announced that be would rr quire the 
following dogs on the grounds the next morning, viz. : 
Lady, Kilgarif, McCloud Boy, Cuba Jr., Harry H. 

Friday, January 15— Lady-Kilgarif — Down at 
9:35 in large open field where dogs had opportunity 
to show range and speed Lady showed to advant- 
age, having wider range, better speed and style than 
Kil. No bird work was done in the heat, and it wes 
evident that Juage Bell desired merely to compare 
the dogs in the respects mentioned. 

After being ordared up J udge Bell announced that 
no further running would be required and declared 
the winners as follows: 1st. Lady ; 2d. Kilgarif; 3d. 
McCloud Boy. 

M EM HERS' STAKE. 

The drawing for the Members' Stake was held im- 
mediately after completion of the All-Age and resulted 
as follows: 

H. W. Keller's Setter bitch Sombra with J. W. 
Flynn's Pointer bitch Nellie Bang. 

C. W. Coggins' Mountain Quail with W. S. Tevis' 
Cuba of Kenwood. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's Setter dog Count's Mark a 
bye. 

Dogs handled by owners. 

Sombra-Nellie Bang — Cast off in heavy cover. 
Nellie was first to find, two birds being raised by her 
handler. Nellie soon made another point, moved up, 
but stopped when birds flushed. Sombra flushed 
wild; but when flushed on scattered birds did excel- 
lent work, making four points in rapid succession. 
Nellie also made several more points, and both were 
steady to wing and shot. Sombra displayed better 
range and style. Up at 11:37. 

Cuba of Kenwood nor Mountain Quail being on 
hand, the bye dog 

Count's Mark was rext put down, with Cuba Jr. as 
a running mate. Count was at first somewhat wild, 
flushing a number of birds on edge of dry ditch, 
finally getting down to hard work in heavy cover, 
where birds were in plentitude, and made a number 
of stylish points, being steady to shot and wing. 
Count's Mark is a litter brother to Lady, winner of 
All Ago, and is a fast and stylish dog. 

Cuba of Kenwood-Mountain Quail— Quail was in 
poor condition from lack of work, being fleshy and 
soft. Cuba, though somewhat enfeebled and suffer- 
ing from rheumatism when warmed up showed some 
of his old-time form and did some very clever work, 
making three very pretty points, one of which Quail 
refused lo back. Ho was steady to shot. Towards 
end of heat Quail made a very stylish point and was 
steady to shot. Ordered up at 2:52. 

Judge Bell announced the winners as follows: 1st, 
Count's Mark; 2nd, Cuba of Kenwood; 3rd, Sombra. 

Thus ended one of the most pleasant trials In the 
history of the club. 

SUMMARIES. 

Bakersfleld, Jamnry 11, 12, 1903-Paciflc Coast 
Field Trial Club's twentr. first annual trials. Derby, 
for Setters and Pointers whelped on or after January. 
1,1901. Purse, $025— three moneys, 50,30 and 20? ' 
and three silver cups donstrd by Jos. E. Terry, J. 
H. Schumacher and W. S. Tevis; 53 nominations, 



10 



[January 23, 1UC4 



(32 paid second forfeit); 20 starters (12 English Setters 

8 Pointers. 

Sharon Boy blaok. white and tan English Setter dog (Tony Boy- 
Spirt's rSsUnj). Chas. W. Coggins, Igerna, Cal., owner; A H. 
Nelson, breeder; J. E. Luoas^handler. 

Sombra orange and white English Setter bitch (Llewellyn Drake- 
Shadow) H. W. Keller, Santa Moniea. owner; W. W. \ an 
Arsdale, breeder; W. B. Coutts, handler. 

Countess Lou. black, white and tan English Setter bitch (County 
Mark-Mary Lou). Joa. E. Terry, owner and breeder, W. a. 
Coutts, handler. with 

Starlight Jr.. blaok, white and tan English Setter dog (Starlight 
W -Rod's Sylvia). B. J. Baum, San Francisco, owner and 
breeder; J E. Lucas, handler. 

Puna's Cottonwood liver and white Pointer dog (Ch. Cuba of Ken- 
w^-Pet%Mlffl. Stockd.le Kennels, Bakersfleld, owner and 
breeder; R. M. Dodge, handler. 

With 

Mias Nelson, white, black and tan English Setter bitch (Tony 
Boy-Sport's Destiny). C. W. Coggins. owner: A. H Nelson, 
Tacoma, breeder; J E. Lucas, handler. 

Hick's Bab white, black and tan English Setter bitch (Doc Hick- 
Woodcraft). J W. Consldine, Seattle, owner; F. A. Malbaugh, 
Liberty, Ind , breeder; J. E. Lucas, handler. 

With 

Cuba's Glenwood, white and liver Pointer dog (Ch. Cuba of Ken- 

wood-Petronella). Stockdale Kennels, owner and breeder, R. 

M. Dodge, handler. 
Glen Rose, black and white Pointer dog (Glendale-Kenwood 

Rose). W. B. Coutts, Kenwood, owner and breeder, Chas. 

Coutts, handler. 

\\ ith 

Keepsake, white, black and tan English Setter bitch '(California 

Bell Boy-Peach Blossom). W. W. Van Arsdale, owner and 

breeder Chas. Baboock, handler. 
Star's Rod, orange and white English Setter dog (Starlight W.- 

Rod's Sylvia). T J. Wattson, San Francisco, owner; B. J. 

Baum. San Franoisco, breeder; Coutts, handler. 

With 

Sandlewood liver and white Pointer dog (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood- 
Petronella). C. E. Worden, San .Franoisco, owner; Stockdale 
Kennels, breeder; J. E. Lucas, handler. 

Hick's Lad, white, blaok and tan English Setter dog (Doc Hick- 
Woodcralt) J W. Consldine, owner and breeder;Couits handler. 
With 

Fly's Pearl, black and white Pointer bitch (Cuba Jr. -Winnipeg 
Fly). Stockdale Kennels, owner and breeder; R. M. Dodge, 
handler. 

Valita, white, black and tan English Setter bitch (California Bell 
Boy-Rod's Lark) J. H. Schumacher, Los Angeles, owner; W. 
W. Van Arsdale, breeder; Coutts, handler. 

With 

Cuba's Ivy wood, liver and white Pointer bitch (Ch. Cuba of Ken- 

wood-Petronella). Stockdale Kennels, owner and. breeder; R. 

M. Dodge, handler. 
Klamath, black, white and tan English Setter dog (California 

Bell Boy-Rod's Lark). W. VV. Van Arsdale, owner and breeder; 

Chas Babcock, handler 



With 



)■ 



II. 

Harry H. with J. M. 
Kilgarif with McCloud Boy. 
California Bell Boy with Midget. 
Cuba Jr. with Lady. 

III. 

Lady with Kilgarif. 

HBSULT. 

First, Lady; second, Kilgarif; third, McCloud Boy. 

Bakeksfikld, January 15, 1904. — Pacific Coast 
Field Trial Club's twenty-first annual trials. Mem- 
bers' Stake. Prizes, silver cups donated by W. W. 
Richards, J. W. Flynn and Western Field. $10 to 
start. 5 starters (3 English Setters, 2 Pointers). 
Dogs handled by owners. 

I 

H. W. Keller's English Setter bitch Sombra. 

With 

J. W. Flynn's Pointer bitch Nellie Bang. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's English Setter dog Count's Mark, a bye 

with Stockdale Kennel's Cuba Jr. 
Stookdale Kenn«TsCh. Cuba of Kenwood, lller and white Pointer 

dog (Glenbeigh Jr.-DoJge's Stella). 

With 

Chas. W. Coggins' Mountain Quail, black, white and tan English 
Setter bitoh (Charm-Jessie Gladstone). G. W. Tibbetts. 
Colusa, Cal., breeder. 

RESULT. 

First, Count's Mark; second, Ch. Cuba of Kenwood; third, Sombra. 



Frank W , liver and white Pointer dog (Don Graphic 

J H Sohumacher, owner; F. W. Emery, Pasadena, Cal., breeder 

J. E. Lucas, handler. 
Wallace Bruoe, liver and white Pointer dog (Kenwood Dan 

Whisper) Dr. A. T. Leonard, San Francisco, owner; Tod Sloan 

breeder; J. E. Lucas, handler. 

With 

Lady's Lad, black and white English Setter dog (Clipper W ■ 
Lady). Alex Hamilton, San Francisco, owner; Jos. E Terry 

breeder; W. B. Coutts. handler. 

II 

Sombra with Cuba's Glenwood. 
Hick's Bab with Glen Rose. 
Keepsake with Cuba's Ivy wood. 



First, Cuba's Glenwood; second. Cuba's Ivywood; equal third, 
Sjmbra and Keepsake 

Bakersfield, January 13, 14, 15, 1903 — Pacific 
Coast Field Trial Club's twenty-first annual trials. 
All-Age Stake, open to all Pointers and Setters. 
Pur9e $400, three moneys, 50, 30 and 20,°,; and three 
silver cups donated by Clinton E. Worden, W. W. 
Van Arsdale and Frank Maskey. $10 forfeit and $10 
additional to start; 21 nominations, 19 starters (12 
English Setters, 7 Pointers). 

I 

Harry H , blaok, white and tan English Setter dog (Why ;Not- 
Sue). C. E. Worden, owner; Geo. E. Gray, Appleton, Minn., 
breeder; W. B. Coutts, handler. 

With 

Pearl's Jingle, liver and white Pointer bitch ( Young Jingo-Pearl's 
Dot II). C. E. Worden, owner; Geo. E. Gray, breeder; J. E. 
Lucas, handler. 

Detroit Joe. white, black and tan and ticked English Setter 
dog (Joe's Count-Queen of Diamonds). W. W. Van Arsdale, 
owner; L. N. Hllsendegen, Detroit, breeder; Chas. Babcock, 
handler. 

With 

Jay M, orange and white English Setter dog (Col. R -Spot'sGIrl). 
C. E. Worden, owner; Qeo. E. Gray, breeder; J. E. Lucas, 
handler. 

Kllgariff, black, white and tan English Setter dog (Orion-Mary 
Lou). Jos. E. Terry, Sacramento, owner and breeder; Coutts, 
handler. 

With 

Oakley's Pride, white, black, tan and ticked English Setter dog 
(Oakley HIll-GypseyQueen). w W. Van Arsdale. owner: Chas. 
W. Tway, Irwin, Ohio, breeder; Babcock, handler. 

Policy Girl, black, white and tan English Setter bitch (Dave 
Earl-Top's Queen). J. W. Considlne, owner; Luoas, handler. 
With 

McCloud Boy, black, white, tan and ticked English Setter dog 

(Way Boy-Sadie). W. W Van Arsdale, owner; Hugh Hopkins, 

Minturn. Cal., breeder; Babcock handler. 
Margarolte, black and white Pointer bitch (Cuba's Zep-Jingo's 

Bagpipe). Stockdale Kennels, owner and breeder; R.M.Dodge, 

handler. 

With 

Nellie Bang, lemon and white Pointer bitch (Ch. Senator P.-Ludy 

Belle), J. VV. Flynn, San Franoisco, owner: B. E. Pindar, 

breeder; Coutts, handler. 
Cuba's Zep, black and tan Pointer dog (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood- 

Jaqulna). Stockdale Kennels, owner and breeder; Dodge, 

handler. 

With 

California Bell Boy, white, black, tan and ticked English Setter 
dog (Tony Boy-Lena Belle). W. W. Van Arsdale, owner; 
Pierre Lorlllard, breeder; Babcock. handler. 

Count's Clip, blaok. white and tan English Setter bitch (Cb. 
Lady's Count Gladstone-Jessie Rodtleld). J. W. Consldine, 
owner; Dr. J. A. Bown, Charlton, la , breeder; Coutts, handler. 
With 

Midget, blaok and white Pointer bitoh (Cuba's Zep-Jingo's Bag- 
pipe) Stockdale Kennels, owner and breeder; Carlyle, handler. 

Petronella. liver and white Pointer bitch (Young Jim-Florida). 
Stockdale Kennels, owner and breeder; Dodge, handler. 
With 

Sport's Destiny, black, white and tan English Setter bitch 
(Marie's Sport-Mark's Fleet). A. H. Nelson, Tacoma, Wash , 
owner; H. B. Ladbetter, Farmington, Mo., breeder; Lucas, 
handler. 

Count's Peg, black, white and tan English Setter bitch (Ch. 
Lady's Count Gladstone- Jessie Rodtleld). J. W. Consldine. 
owner; Dr. J. A. Bown, breeder; Lucas, handler. 

With 

Cuba Jr., liver and white Pointer dog (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood- 
Florida). Stockdale Kennels, owner and breeder; Dodge, 
handler. 

Lady, lemon and white English Setter bitch (Ch. Count's Glad- 
Stone IV-Peach Mark). Jos. E. Terry, owner; W. W. Van 
Arsdale, breeder; Coutts, handler. A bye. 




a superintendent and veterinary surgeon for the 
spring show. 

Among the questions discussed was that of the pro- 
posed conference between the various Pacific Kennel 
League Club members, scheduled to meet at an early 
date in Seattle. The local club delegates were in- 
structed to take such steps as would promote the 
welfare of the Coast clubs, with the object in view of 
bringing about a unification of all (Coast) doggy in- 
terests and with the ultimate purpose of combining 
all of the Western kennel clubs under one jurisdiction. 

The Seattle correspondent adds: "1 he success of 
the recent P. K. L. show in San Francisco has in- 
spired the various P. K. L. league clubs to renewed 
activity in kennel affairs and it is probable that the 
league will not only continue to exercise control over 
bench show affairs, but will shortly inaugurate 
several new features calculated to solidify all of the 
P. K. L. clubs under one parent head acd insure the 
supremacy of the league throughout the West. The 
move means the seggregation of all Coast clubs from 
the A. K. C. and the substitution of a government 
adapted to the peculiar (?) requirements of the terri- 
tory over which the Pacific Kennel League now holds 
complete sway. " 

The following from the Victoria Daily Colonist is in- 
dicative that Northern fanciers are' actuated by 
much enthusiasm. In this respect it would not be a 
bad example to follow. Small shows, for an evening, 
particularly specialty shows, for a cup or other 
trophy, are a nucleus for big shows. One of the 
largest bench shows in England today, the Chelten- 
ham show, is the outgrowtn of small one night 
gatherings: 

"The entertainment committee of the Victoria City ' 
Kennel Club have now completed arrangements for 
the holding of the last evening show of the season, 
which will take place in the Philharmonic ball on 
Fort street on the evening of Thursday, the 28th of 
Jrnuary 1904. The breeds will be Cocker Spaniels, 
all varieties of Terriers, Collies, St. Bernard's and a 
miscellaneous class. Dr. G. L. Milne has consented 
to judge Cockers; Mr. Hodgson will take all Terriers 
and Mr. Turner the Collies, St. Bernard's and mis- 
cellaneous class. 

The entry fee will be the same as heretofore, viz., 
25 cents per dog for each class entered in. Prize 
money to be devoted to purchase of silver medal for 
best in each breed, provided at lea6t three dogs are 
entered in a class. Members of the club and exhibitors 
free, admission for others, ten cents per head. 

Exhibitors are earnestly requested to have their 
dogs in the hall by half-past six, so that there will be 
no delay in commencing judging at T o'clock sharp, 
and are also reminded that each dog must be pro- 
vided with collar and chain." 



(. IT. MILLER 



San Francisco Kennel Club. 



The annual meeting of the San Francisco Kennel 
Club was held Monday evening, January 11, 1904 at 
the Occidental Hotel. The following ofllcer9 were 
elected: Charles K. Harley, President; John E. De 
Huyter, Vice-President; John L. Cunningham, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer. John E. De Ruyter, W. C. Ralston, 
W. S. Kittle, John L. Cunningham, Charles K. 
Harley, Directors. John E. De Ruyter, John L. 
Cunningham, Charles K. Harley, Bench Show Com- 
mittee. The eighth annual show will be held in the 
Mechanics' Pavilion April 13th to 16th, four days. 

DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



Julius Redelsheimer, of Seattle, was on a brief visit 
in this city last week. 

Seattle has fixed its dates for April 13th to 16tb, 
and will probably use Coast judges as will San Jose. 



The proposed one day show at Oak Grove has been 
postponed, it will be held, probably, the same week 
as the San Jose show. 



The California Collie Club will hold its one day 
show the day before San Jose. As San Jose will be a 
three day show, this will enable three shows, San 
Francisco, Collie Club and San Jose to be held in 
two weeks and will, it is expected, briDg many of the 
Northern dogs down. 



Tho Santa Clara Kennel Club was organized in San 
Jose on the 13tb inst. 

The officers elected were: H. Doble, President ; C. 
W. Coe, First Vice-President; H. Centre, Second 
Vice-President; Miss Delia Beach, Secretary: J. 
Perry, Treasurer. Bench Show Committee — N. J. 
Stewart, W. C. Bogen, J. Perry and Miss Delia Beach. 

The club has applied for membership in P. K. L. 

The club's initial show will be held the week 
after the sprine show in this city. 



The Seattle Kennel Club have elected the following 
officers for the ensuing year: John W. Riplinger, 
President; E. L. Reber and C. E. Bletben, Vice- 
presidents; Arthur Murphy, Treasurer; Charles Mc- 
Allister, Secretary; L. B. Youngs, F. A. Pontius, F. 
W. Gilbert, C. B. Yandell and J. A. Peebles, Bench 
Show Committee. The committee will later on select 



The American Kennel Club was incorporated at 
Albany, N. Y., December 30th. The board of direct- 
orate is August Belmont, Hempstead, N. Y.; Hollis 
H. Hunnewell, Wellesley, Mass.; Hildreth K. Blood- 
good, James W. Appleton, William G. Rockefeller, 
New York City; Marcel A. Viti, Philadelphia; Gou- 
verneur M. Carnochan, Riverside, N. Y., and Wm. 
B. Emery, Boston. 

King Commando has been purchased from the 
Ellesgy Kennels by H. M. Pabst. 

J. F. Mahoney, of this city, states that Mrs. A. W- 
Lee, the well known owner of the Alta Kennels> 
Toledo, Ohio, will pay a visit to the Coast this spring. 
Mrs. Lee proposes to take in the April show. 

Striped Bass Angling. 

Striped bass fishing in the waters near Tiburon, 
Marin county, is now a defined quantity and the possi- 
bilities of enjoying sport with rod aDd line are demon- 
strated by a partial record of fish taken by Mr. G. W. 
Miller and a few notes of catches made by several 
other anglers. It will be seen by the dates below 
that the fish taken were evidently caught at times 
when they were frequenting the waters here men- 
tioned, for the anglers were out a number of times 
and returned empty handed. These fish were all 
taken on No. 5 and 6 Wilson spoons. It will be re- 
membered that during October some big catches 
were also made by members of the Pacific Striped 
Bass Club. 

Mr. Miller is a resident of Belvidere, and despite 
his age, nearly three score and ten, is an expert boat- 
man and can give some of the younger devotees of the 
fishing grounds a few pointers in hooking and land- 
ing a bass. 

The fish Mr. Miller landed weie taiten in Belvedere 
cove, near Peninsular Point, and between tbe.point 
and the fish wharf on Belvedere island. This fishing 
ground, as is well known, being at certain stages of 
the tides rather turbulent and full of swift currents 
and stormy, swirling eddies. 

Mr. Miller's take for 

April wa9 — 23rd, 2 bass, 5 pounds each; 25th, 1 basp, 
6} lbs.; 28th, 1 bass, 4J lbs.; 30th, 1 bass, 5 lbs. 
"May 9th, 1 bass, 4* lbs. 
July 31st, 1 bass, 9 lbs. 

October 2nd, 1 bass, 21 lbs.; 3rd, 1 bass, 12 lbs.; 4tb, 
1 bass, 13 lbs.; 7th, 1 bass, 12 lbs. (these two fish were 
caught off Angel island); 18th, 1 bass, 14 lbs.; 21st, 1 
bass, 4 lbs.; 22nd, 1 bass, 11 lbs.; 23rd, 1 has?, 11* lbs.; 
27th. 1 bass, 19* lbs ; 31st, 1 bass, 8 lbs. (This fiah was 
a very game one and put up a good fight until gaffed). 

November 16th, 1 bass, 3 lbs.; 25th, 1 bass, 15 lbs. 

December 2nd, 1 bas9, 13 lbs. 

The 21 pound bass measured 37* inches in length; 
19J pounder, 30*. inches; 15 pounder, 34* inches; 14 
pounder 32j inches. 

On July 31st, Roy and Fannie Miller, grandchildren 
of Mr. Miller landed two fish weighing 10J and 7 
pounds respectively. On October 4th, Mr. Chas. E. 
Miller, his son, was fishing with him off Angel island. 

From the foregoing record it will be readily seen 



January 23, 1804 j 



(The pveeSgv S3 ^tyoxtsnuTtt 



that Mr. Miller, Sr., ia an angler of skill and per- 
severance. 

In connection with this Mr. Miller has given us the 
results of a fine combined catch made an October 
27th at Pettycoat cove, Angel island, by Mr. Chas. E. 
Miller and the late James It. Pariser. Kight bass 
were taken on their trolling spoons, and the weights 
were: 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 4, and 4 pounds respectively. 



Close season on steelbead trout will ensue from Feb- 
ruary 1st until April 1st. 

Until the last rains fishing for the game trout of 
the Coast streams has been better than for several 
seasons past. 

The best steelbead fishing enjoyed by local anglers 
was had near Point Reyes in the Paper Mill creek. 
Last Sunday there was quite a gathering of Wal- 
tonians at that resort. The heavy rains of the pre- 
vious night, however, spoiled to a great extent the 
fishing for the day. The creek howevei was getting 
into fine shape again this week, and clear weather to- 
day and to-morrow will in vite another gathering of 
the anglers. 

Russian river, up as far as Austin creek, has proven 
a fairly good steelhead fishing water until the recent 
rain. A large number of local fishermen were at 
Duncan's Mills enjoying thesport. Prominent among 
them were, Champion John Gallagher and the Dook 
of 'Ayden. These two veteran anglers have not 
ml ssed a season on the river (when there was any 
fishing), for years past Butler (tbe Dook) returned 
to the city with several fine fish. "President" Lem- 
mer also took a shy at tbe stream and landed several 
big fish, 
sai 



aer also took a shy at the stream and landed several 
ig fish. Among others present were "Aleck" Vogel- 
»ng, "Al" Wilson, Harte Williams and S. A. Wells. 



TheChristmas numberof tbe Kncjlinh Shooting Tiuns 
is, as usual, replete with stories contributed by some 
of the most practical and interesting sportsmen 
writers of the times. Tbe illustrations are timely 
and in keeping with the letter press. Tbe edition is 
one that will commend itself to sportsmen the world 
over. 



Fred Gilbert, who lead the trap shooters in 1903, 
has missed but one live bird out of the last two hun- 
dred shot at, his handicap being from thirty-two to 
thirty-throo yards. He always shoots Winchester 
factory loaded Leader shells. 



Coming Events. 



April l-Sept. 10. Oct. 18-Fob. 1 -Open wmoo (or taking steel- 
Dead Id tidewater. 

Not. l-Aprll I— Trout season closed 

Jul; I Jan I —Open season for black bam 

Auk IS-Aprll 1-Open season for lobster* and crawfish 

Nov. I -Sept. I— Open season for crabs. 

Sept. 1-Mar 1— Open season for shrimp. 

Sept. IO-Oot IS -Close season In tidewater for steelbead. 

Nor. IS-Rept 10 -Season open for taking salmon above tide 
wator 

ami 

July 1-Feb. 15 — Dore season opsn. 
Nov. I -July IS— Doer season closed. 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15-Opon season for mountain quail, grouse and 
sage hen. 

Oct. lS-Feb. IS-Open seaaon ."or quail, ducks, etc. 

Ilenrli Slums 

Jan an. fct-Toledo Fanciers' Association Toledo. O. A. W. 
Lee, Secretary, Toledo, O. 

Jan. 87, 30— National Fanciers' and Breeders' Association. 
Chicago. 

Feb. a. 7-Ohlo State Poultry Association. Columbus, O W. 
A. Lott, Secretary, Wooster, O. 

Feb. t, 12— Fanciers' Association of Indiana. Indianapolis, Ind 
C. R. Mllbous. Secretary 

Feb. 10. I3-Westmlnater Kennel Club, Madison Sqaarc tlarden, 
New York James Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Feb 18 SO— Johnstown Poultry and Kennel Club, Johnstown, Pa- 
J R. Flint]. Superintendent. 

Feb. S3, 25-New England Kennel Club. Boston, Mass Wm It 
Emery. Secretary 

March l. 2— Merrimack Valley Kennel Club. Lawrence, Mass. 
Albert Mitchell, Secretary. 

March a, 5-Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania. 
Pittsburg, Pa. Fred S. Stedman, Secretary. 

March 9, la— Rochester Kennel Club. Rochester, N. Y. H H. 
Kingston. Secretary: 



E. P. Sharp, 
Brantford. Can. Thos 



Marcb III, IS— Chicago Kennel Club. Chicago. III. 11. J . Caaaady. 
Secretary 

March ta. 2&— Buffalo Kennel Club. Buffalo, N. Y. 
Secretary. 

March S8. .D-Brantfonl Kennel Club 
If. Terry, Secretary. 

March so. April a-Atlantlc City Kennel Club. Atlantic City, 
N J. Thomas II. Terry, Secretary 

April 7, s— Victoria Kennel Club Victoria, B. C. Thos. H. 
Torry, Secretary. Victoria, II C. 

April IS, IS -Sao Francisco Kennel Club. Eighth annual show. 
Mechanics' Pavilion. J. L Cunningham, Secretary-Treasurer. 

April IS. IS— Seattle Kennel Club Seattle, Wash. Charles 
McAllister. Secretary. 

April »> California Collie Club Oak Qrore. Lawrence. Santa 
Clara Oo. 

April ai, SS -Santa Clara Kennel Club. 
Delia Beach. Secretary, Sao Jose, Cal. 

April Portland Kennel Club. Portland, Or. T. E. Daniels. 

Secretary. 

Oct 4, 7 Danbiiry Agricultural Society Danbury, Conn Jaa 
Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Field Trials. 

Jan 19-Ueorgls Field Trial Association, ad annual trials 
Waynesboro, Ga. P. M. Eaalg, Secretary, Atlanta, QSV 

Jan. aS-Calted States Field Trial Club ilrand Junction, Tenn. 
W. B. Stafford. Secretary. Trenton. Tenn. 

Feb National Championship Association. Orsnd Junction. 

Tonn W B Stafford, Secretary, Trenton. Tenn. 



San Jose, Cal. Miss 



Kennel Registry. 



VISITS. 

J C. Berrett's (San Jose) Irish Terrier hitch Nora (Wllmount 

Rlghwayman-Endclirte Kitty) to Mr W 11 Whltller's Irish 

( ) January 1«, 18, 1809. 

WHELPS. 

Woodlawn Kennels' Bull Terrier bitch Newmarket Queen 
(Ch Newmarket Marcel-Newmarket Duchess) whelped January 
j, 1903, Ore puppies (3 dogs) to A Joseph's Bloomsbury Baron 
(Sherburne Klng-Bloomsbury Butterfly ) 

SALES. 

Woodlawn Kennels sold tbe Bull bitch True Blue (Cb. Ivel 
Bustle - Baby Jean) to H M. Papst, January 15, I COS. 

Walter Magee sold tbe Bulldog Woodlawn Rustic (Ch. Ire 
Rustic-Dixie) to Woodlawn Kennels. January 15, 1003. 



Sober Oti on .1 ar k- -on N ana Sods. 



THE FARM. 



it&Kld^ ^a7v 

A Wide Market for Mohair. 



The increasing number of Angora goats 
in the United States has resulted in con- 
siderable inquiry relative to the market 
for this product. The Department of Ag- 
riculture in conducting an investigation 
relative to the Angora goat industry made 
extensive inquiry of growers, says Orange 
Jud'1 Farmer. The universal opinion 
seems to be that there is at present no 
difficulty in disposing of mohair The 
breeders believe that the demand will 
continue to increase. One Arizona pro- 
ducer stated that he had no difficulty in 
disposing of his good mohair, but short, 
kempy stock goes slow and sells at low 
prices. The ingenuity of manufacturers 
in working the better grades into woolen 
fabrics and the finsst piushes and the 
poorer grades into plushes for car seats, 
horse blankets, etc., is creating a large 
consumptive demand. 

There are more than enough factories in 
this country to work up all the mohair 
that is produced and will be for some time 
to come. In fact many of them have not 
attempted to use mohair, because the sup- 
ply is so limited. The mohair factories 
are all in the eastern part of the country 
and the principal market is Xew York 
city. The marketing center of the world 
if Bradford, England, where all the prod- 
uct from the Cape of fiood Hope and Tur- 
key is sold. Very few mills purchase from 
the grower; they pre'er to buy from the 
commission merchant after he has sepa- 
rated and classified the fleeces. A few 
purchasers sell to merchants in Boston 
and in the northwest to Portland dealers. 
On the western coast San Jose, Cal., is a 
prominent market. 

The UBe of Angora pelts for rugs and 
trimmings is quite extensive. When it 
became impossible to supply the demand 
for Buffalo robes there came a great de- 
mand for Angora skins tanned with the 
hair on. The skin is tough and the fleece 
can be easily dyed any desirable color. 
At present the skins of the kids and 
younger does are made into robes for baby 
carriages. A greater number is used for 
this purpose than in any other way. As 
rugs they are both durable and ornamental 
and their softness makes them very desir- 
able. As a general statement Angora 
pelts are worth from $2 to $3 each. 



Notes for the Cowkeeper. 

Wheat bran is better for the production 
of milk than corn meal. 

The cow, as well as any other farm stock, 
will pay a better profit if treated kindly. 

A cow is profitable just as long as she 
gives a profitable return for the food she 
conaumes. 

The best cream raising can only be 
secured by keeping the milk sweet as 
long as possible. 

To a very considerable extent the mat- 
ter of noteble performances is wholly an 
individual function. 

A combination of bran, oil meal and 
corn meal makes one of tbe best rations 
for dairy cows in the winter. 

Loss of flesh and shrinkage of milk fol 
lows neglect, and starvation follows 
rations of improper food. 

Garget most often sets in after calving, 
and this is nearly always due to a failure 
to get the udder dry. 

Milk regularly twice a day. If a cow- 
does not give a sufficient amount of milk 
to warrant this, let her go dry. 

The dairy cow isa milk-making medium 
and should be kept in the best working 
condition, which is one of quiet. 

Many of the cows kept on the farm 
cannot, either by feed or care, be induced 
to yield a profitable amount of milk. 
Tbe sooner this class is fattened and 
marketed, tbe better for the profits of the 
farm. 

The best foods to make blood are the 
best for milk production, and the cow to 
make good milk needs good blood. That 
can best and cheapest l>e made by gener- 
ous, comfortable treatment, comfortable 
quarters, pure air, pure water and whole- 
some, nutritious food.— KfalAoO'l Dairy 
Fa rmer. 

Cold Grafting Wax. 



Kvery on-hardist knows what trouble it 
is when top grafting in rold weather to 
warm his wax. Me has to carry some 
kind of heating apparatus along with bim 
and by some carelessness if the w ax is too 
hot, it ia impossible the bark of the stock 
or scions will get burnt. This never 
occurs when cold grafting wax is used and 
it is not very costly if ma le as follows I 

One pound of resin melted slowly on 
the stove. When it is melted, warm two 
and one-half ounces of aVohol and one 
tablespoonful of linseed oil, add this to 
the melted resin. I'ut it in a tin pot mix 
well and let cool slowly and then close 
hermetically. This wax can be put on 



FREE. 



For HORSEMEN 

1904 RACE PROSPECTS 

2:20 TROTTERS 

2 : I O TROTTER3 

2:20 RACERS 

2:1 O RACERS 

Nsmes and Records of Trotters and Pacers Under 2t20 
and Liable to Race in 1904 

We hare just published a fine book giving names and rec- 
ords of nil Trotters and Pacers below 2:20 that are liable to 
race in 1904. This book contains 52 pages of fine paper with 
extra good cover and Just Jhe Right Sire 1o Co In your 
Pocket. Every Horse Trainer. Care Taker. Horse Breeder 
or any one interested in horses can have one of these books. 
Absolutely free, for reference. It also contains names of 
all horses holding world records. We had it compiled at a 
large expense and you will find it a valuable and handy 
reference book for the entire year of 1904. 

'With Postage Prepaid 



IT WILL BE MAILED FREE 



IF YOU WILL 8TATK WHF.ItF. YOU SAW THIS OFFKK 

Aad Ml t« >•!>.< I., r »•» 0«n Icj Nlork Or \.t. 



L»i.i il si t I ■ : > ..• I i r . 

' la lb* World. 
Cspllsl !■». I in. t. 'rfX'.nno 



International Stock Food Co, 



Mlasr. polls. Minn.. U. S. A. 



small wounde with a stick or brush and is 
very useful for grafting. 

1 . ' This grafting wax we can use in any 
kind of weather, warm or cool, dry tr 
moist. 

2. It holds good on moist wounds. 

3 That the callous forms quick under 
them. 

4. It holds off air anil wetness. 

5. No scions get burned as when using 
warm grafting wax. 

b\ It takes leas material. 

7. It is cheaper than some other graft- 
ing wax. 

8. Everybody can make it with lees 
trouble and rost. 

o 

Poor Cows. 



A. H. ANDERSON 

Live Stock Auctioneer 

and Oenersl Auotion Business, Real Estate, etc. 
Halts Held In Any Part of the State. 

Correspondence solicited. 

19 Turk St., San Francisco. 

Branch -1 101 J Streot, Sacramento 



When a man increases the number of 
his cows at the <:x|>enBe of quality he does 
a very unbusinesslike thing, says Hairy 
awl Crram'ry. Hotter not keep RON 
cows unle:s they are good ones. Take 
better care of what you have and be con- 
tent rather than buy poor cows. Where 
one raises his own cows he should test 



out the heifers that do not promise as we I 
as possible, no matter if they are regis- 
tered and have a good pedigree. We must 
have something in tbe dairy barn besidi ■ 
breeding to make a success. We want in- 
dividuality. When this is « oil backed up 
by breeding all the better, but tl e profit - 
able cow we must have. It is not always 
judicious to sell a heifer if she does not 
come up to the standard the first Beacon 
provided shegives promi6e of better work 
later on. One must use his judgment as 
well as the scales and Babcock test with a 
heifer. It ia a good plan to have an an- 
nual clearance sale and dispose of the in- 
desirable cows to the butcher. 

o 

Jackson's Napa Soda is sold in every 
oltjr, tows and hamlet in the State. 



12 



[Januaby 23, 1*4 



Holsteia-Friesians at Home. 



[g, Hoxle, before the New York State Breeders' 
Association]. 

Holatein-Friesian cattle have been pro- 
duced by an environment in which the 
peasant farmers of North Holland and 
Friesland have unconsciously taken a 
large and very essential part. These 
peasants are the descendants of the an- 
cient Friesians, of which Tacitus wrote 
nearly two thousand years ago, that they 
were peaceable cattle breeders dwelling 
on the shores of the North sea. How 
they were then protected in this peacea- 
ble occupation amid the rovine, piratical 
tribes that surrounded them is unknown. 
They claim to have never been con- 
i|uered, but admit that their ancient an- 
cestors formed an alliance with the Ro- 
man Empire, and paid to it an annual 
tribute of ox hides and horns. 

It is almost impossible for an American 
farmer to imagine the intense conserva- 
tism of these peasant farmers, especially 
those of Friesland, where the ancient 
blood is pure. Here they use the ancient 
Friesian dialect in conversing with one 
another, although educated in their very 
excellent common schools, exclusively in 
the Holland or Dutch language. They 
seldom intermarry with other races, and 
evidently cherish an abhorrence to such 
unions. They apparently have no 
ambitions beyond dwelling with and 
handling cattle Doubtless they con- 
stitute the wealthiest class of peasantry 
in Europe, yet they refuse to be regarded 
other than third class people. In North 
Holland, where there is a considerable 
admixture of Celtic blood, this conserva 
tism is not so intense, and farmers are 
sometimes called to high positions of 
state. 

The conservative spirit that I have thus 
described, together with the soil, climate 
and the influence of markets, must be 
largely credited with producing the char- 
acteristics of this breed, to which we 
American breeders have given the name 
Holstein-Friesian. 

The first thing we note is the natural 
richness of the soils. Those on which 
the cattle are bred and used in dairy hus- 
bandry generally range from light to ex- 
ceedingly heavy clays, although some 
fine herds are found on loam and peat 
soils. The larger cattle are found on the 
heavier soils. So important, in the de- 
velopment of cattle, do breeders regard 
the influence of soils, their herd books 
require that the kind of soil on which the 
animal is bred and raised shall be pub- 
lished in its entry. In their view, the 
value of a pedigree may be determined to 
some extent by the soils on which the 
animals included in it were bred. I do 
not propose to draw any inferences in 
this paper as to the value of the various 
features of the environment that I shall 
try to describe. I leave this for the dis- 
cussion that I hope will follow. 

The second thing we note is the climate 
and the provisions made against its ex- 
treme severity in winter. It is said that 
the ice freezes on the Ij, an arm of the 
/.uvder /ee, at Amsterdam, to the depth 
of three and a half feet. The region is a 
stormy one in winter, it lies so exposed to 
the sleets and blasts of the North Sea. 
Against these the cattle must be protected. 
Immense structures — call them houses or 
barns— are seen in every direction, in 
which the cattle are kept during this 
period, in close intimacy with the farmer's 
whole family. In form they resemble 
immense tents. A description of one will 
give the general type. On the ground, 80 
feet wide and 135 feet long; outside wall 
of brick, 6,'o feet high ; an inside structure 
of large poles similar to our telegraph 
poles supports a very steep roof, the ridge 
of which is forty or fifty feet from the 
.floor; in the rear is a modern structure 
about 20 wide and 25 feet long, in which 
are a narrow hall, a family sitting room 
and parlor. The kitchen is in the main 
building, a door opens from it into the 
cow stable, which is about Hi feet wide 
and runs one side of the great structure 
its full length. It accommodates 36 cows 



in stalls, two in a stall, a window in each 
stall fronting the cows. Here they are 
fed and watered during the whole winter 
without leaving their stalls. They have 
no exercise save what they get in the 
stabs. 

This stable seems to be comfortably 
warmed by the heat that emanates from 
the cows, but do they have sufficient 
change of air? About eight feet above 
the stable is a loose covering of boards on 
which there is a layer of loose straw. 
Evidently to a certain extent the heated 
air from the bodies of the cows passes up 
through this covering into the great roof 
space and thence to the outside by venti- 
lators in the ridge of the roof. FreBh air 
is supplied from the great barn space be- 
low, through doors and perhaps more or 
leBScrevices in the partition that separates 
the stable from this space. 

The third thing we note is the necessi- 
ties of these farmers. As a class they are 
tenants', and have to pay an annual rent 
to tl»«sir landlords of from $10 to $20 an 
acre on their holdings. Their cows must 
be rent payers. They cannot afford to 
keep a single cow at a loss, as our farmers 
sometimes do. In their system of man- 
agement the cows must be made profitable, 
both in the products of milk and the pro- 
ducts of flesh. When I was a young man 
I worked for a dairy farmer who held that 
some dairy cows could be profitably fatted 
for beef and others could not be thus 
profitably fatted, and tiiat the difference 
lay in the fact that the onec ass deposited 
fat largely around the kidneys and on the 
intestines, the other largely on the ribs 
and the interstices of the muscles. I do 
not know that this theory is correct, but 
I venture it as a hypothesis to explain 
the successof these Friesian dairymen. 

Lastly, a few minor features are worthy 
of note. Among these are the bull s^hows 
held in the springtime in almost every 
village and the cow markets held weekly 
or bi-weekly in the principal towns and 
villages. Roth are fostered by the local 
governments. The former are designed 
to educate the farmers in the best types 
of bulls and to enable them to select and 
purchase such as are suitable for their 
herds. There is no display about these 
shows and no holiday excitement. They 
are for business. The same may be said 
of the cow markets, yet I doubt if a finer 
display of cows has ever been seen at any 
of our World's Fairs that are shown every 
week at some of the market places. In 
order to give a correct impression of the 
influence of these markets on the develop- 
ment of the breed, I will describe the 
one at Leuwarden, the shire town or 
capital of Friesland. The market ground 
occupies from four to six acres. Here on 
every Friday may be seen from two hun- 
dred tofour hundred cows, nicely groomed 
and in fine condition, the great majority 
in milk. They are such as the farmers 
themselves in the surrounding districts 
have selected from their herds to sell. 
The probabilities are that they are not 
as great milkers as they desire to keep. 
Here are buyers from Germany, South 
Holland, Relgium and probably France. 
Every convenience for shipping is pro- 
vided Probably, the majority are sold. 
Of course some will return to their own 
pastures or stables and be brought on the 
next day. Thus a constant sifting pro- 
cess goes on. With rare exceptions they 
do not keep cows beyond six years old. 
Thus it will be seen that their herds are 
constantly renewed by the offspring of 
cows in their prime. 

Refore leaving this part of my subject, 
I hope it will not be regarded out of 
place to refer to the productiveness of 
these cattle in the province of Friesland. 
In 1874, before oleomargarine w e known, 
England imported from this province 
40,763 hundred weight of cheese and 266,- 
041 hundred weight of butter. I quote 
these figures from Chambers' Encyclo- 
pedia. The area of this province is 1,253 
square miles, about that of Herkimer 
county, in this State. In 187'.» a census of 
cows was taken and found to be 144,802. 
If there was a like number in 1874 



England's importation of butterfrom that 
province that year, averaged 204?4 pounds 
to every cow of whatever age or condi- 
tion. 



A Dairy Cow Standard. 

Some twelve years ago, when I took 
charge of the dairy department, we had 
about a dozen ordinary grade cows. 

At present we have about thirty cows 
milking and twenty younger animals 
coming on. 

We have steadily increased the produc 
tion of our herd and last year the average 
of the herd was over 8000 pounds of milk 
per cow, and over 300 pounds of butter 
per cow. 

For 1902 the record is not so large, 
owing to the fact that we have five heifers 
with first calves, which have brought 
down the average. 

However, I believe we are steadily im- 
proving our herd. 

We selected first the best grade cows 
we could get, using pure-bred sires of the 
dairy breeds always, and raising practi- 
cally ail the heifer calves; then at the end 
of the second milking period weeding out 
all that had not come up to our standard. 

Here is the first principle I would lay 
down as necessary in founding and main- 
taining a dairy herd- Have a standard, 
and if a cow does not come up to that 
standard, the wise dairyman will get rid 
of her, no matter what 6he cost. 

Our standard is 6000 pounds of milk 
and 250 pounds of butter. 

I expect we shall bring our herd up to 
10,000 pounds of milk and 400 pounds of 
butter per cow. 

That can only bo done by a process of 
breeding and selection. 

When we buy a cow we weigh her milk 
every night and morning, take a sample 
and put it into the Rabcock test and test 
it. 

Then at the end of the month we know 
the number of pounds of milk she is 
yielding and the percentage of fat. 

At the end of the year we know what 
each cow has done, and if she does not 
come up to the standard we get rid of her. 

In the case of heifers, with their first 
calvep, we give them a second trial. 

That briefly is the plan we have 
adopted— raising all our heifer calves, 
having them drop their calves at two and 
one-half or three years old, milking for 
two lactation periods, and weeding out at 
the end of the second lactation period. 

To improve the quality of the herd and 
the quantity of the milk yield, a man 
must not only breed his cows right, and 
weed them out according to standard, but 
it also involves the question of feeding. 

People say: "No wonder your cows 
milk well ; you feed them so well." 

Cows cannot be expected to mi'k well 
on a small quantity of feed. 

I have no time to discuss the question 
of feeding in detail; the main thing is to 
give the cow all the bulky food she will 
eat; but it should be of a digestible and 
palatable nature. 

In addition to this she should receive 
eight pounds of meal to every thirty 
pounds of milk produced in order that 
she may produce milk economically. — 
Prof. JET. H. Deane, Ontario College of 
Agriculture. 

When your laying birds have a warm 
place to roost and a scratching room 
where they are protected from the cold 
winds, they have all that is needed in the 
way of housing and proper feeding will 
do the rest. 

o 

The fall is always the best time to 
make a beginning in the poultry busi- 
ness and we advise starting with your 
own breeding birds and not depend 
upon somebody else to furnish your 
eggs. 



PERCHERON STALLIONS FOR SALE. 

'J-VVO SIX YEARS OLD, TWO THREE YEARS 
old and two two years old. Three blacks and 
three grays. Four of them registered. Full ped- 
igrees given. Apply to J. A. BEALL, 

Laton, Fresno Co, Cal. 



NEW MODEL 
1D08 





TOOMEY PATENT 

33 to 35 lbs. 

TRACK SULKY 

and 

ROAD CARTS 

THE BEST IN THE WORLD. 

O'BRIEN & SONS 

Cor. Golden Gate Ave. and Polk St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 




FOR SALE. 

Three Standard-Bred Trotting Stallions 

WILKES STOCK. 

One Seal Brown, 16 hands, foaled May 2 1898' 
first dam Fearless by Fallls 4781 (record 2 23) : 
seoond dam Jean Perault by Signal 83*7 

One Golden Bay. 16.1 hands, foaled March 5, 1898- 
flrst dam Signal by Del Sur 1098 (record 2:24) 
dam of Guy Line 2:29 £ ; aecond dam Lady Sig- 
nal by Signal 3327. * 8 

One Brown, white points, 16.1 hands, foaled April 
1899; full brother to the bay. 
These colts are all sired by Prince Alrlee 28045, 

son of Guy Wilkes 2807 (record 2:15w), and bred by 

Wm. Corbltt, San Mateo, Cal. They are pure 

gaited and show wonderful speed for the little 

work they have done. 
For further particulars apply to 

P. H. McEVOY, Menlo Park, Cal. 



ROSE DALE STOCK FARM 

SANTA ROSA, CAL. 
Home of Daly 8:16, Washington Mc- 
Klnneyand St. Whips 2:31, 

has for SALE some broodmares, yearlings, by 
Washington McKlnney. Good prospects for 1904 

and roadsters. 



lUilPKtS^ED Punt -bAli 

^BRICKS 
JMLk rOR ALL STOCK 
M J HEALTH FUL 
JHH^y CONVENIENT 
jai^BLW ECONOMIC A 
m Have the approve 
m of large srot .; 
owners every whe.^ 
Ash your dealer 0/ -end 
*or free boohler to 

- [MONT STARJF y n BrooKlvi 



VETERINARY. 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Turin. 

Infirmary and Residence -81 1 Howard St.: 
between Fourth and Fifth Sts., San Francisco. 
Telephone: Main 457. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage, Saddle and Roar* Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: (OS Golden Gate Avenue, Sao 
Francisco. Cal. Telephone South 851 



H>i*. Wm, F*. Sgau. 

M. R. C. V. S.. F. E. T. M. 8. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnbur* 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Co Ion lea 
at tne port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President ot 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco 
Telephone West 121. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOLSTKINS — Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st ft sd for aged cows, 
4-yr., S-yr. and 2-yr -olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhama 
competing. 5th year my Holstefns hare beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stook for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burke, 80 Montgomery St., 8. F. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTKINS AND DURH AM8. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 187«. William Nlles A Co.. Los Angeles, 
Oal. 



ATBIH1KI 



-Young Balls. Cows and Heifers 



Rsjlalsred. _From prize winning families. Brows 
A Brandon 



Pstaluma Cal. 



January 23, 1904] 



&H* gveebev cmi» &povt#max\ 



13 



Small Sheep Farming. 



A small grass farm for sheep should be 
divided into small fields of from five to 
ten acres each, according to the size of 
the farm and the number of sheep. 

The land devoted to sheep should be 
fully stocked to use the pasture to the 
best advantage and forage crops provided 
for fall feeding when pasture fails and 
the sheep need a little extra feed to put 
them in good condition for winter. 

Rape is one of the best crops for this 
purpose. It is easily grown, yields a 
large tonnage per acre, sheep like it and 
it agrees with them. 

Sheep need but little grain, except when 
giving milk. At this time, as well as for 
some weeks before weaning and after 
weaning, the ewes should receive careful 
attention. Their feed should be well 
balanced to keep them in good healthy 
condition and to supply plenty of milk 
for the lambs. 

A shed, open to the south, with a yard 
that is protected from cold wind?, is one 
of the best arrangements for sheep in 
winter. The shed should be tight t>oarded 
on three sides. If there is no wall under 
the sills, rough boards may be set along 
with the lower edge below ihe surface of 
the ground. Old rails with straw and 
earth thrown over them will answer the 
same purpose, but it is a slovenly way. 
But some means must be provided to 
prevent air currents. Plenty of fresh air 
and light is necessary, but sheep should 
be kept dry and free from draughts. 

Doors or gates are necessary to keep 
the sheep in during stormy weather, as 
thev are very foolish at such times. They 
will, if permitted, stand outside of the 
shed during winter storms until their 
wool is soaked. 

Feed well bred sheep liberally, keep 
them free from parasites and vermin, 
protect them from wind and rain and 
they will pay handsomelv — II. A. Frank- 
fin. . 

Blood meal is one of the best foods we 
have, either for egg produring or for fat- 
tening or rearing chickens, says an Ontario 
correspondent of American Cultivator. 
There is no more economical food to buy. 
It costs $3.50 per hundred, but it is almost 
all good. It is all albumen. We use one 
pound of blood to sixteen pounds of meal. 
Sometimes we use blood right from the 
■laughter house, putting it in sacks and 
boiling for a couple of hours. The blood 
it boiled in water. Put it into a bag. and 
then put the bag into a wash boiler and 
pour water over it and boil for two 
hours. It is then like bran, and you mix 
it with the meal. 

Calves up to one year old fed on alfalfa 
and corn for baby beef require only from 
one-third to one-half as much grain to 
produce 100 pounds gain as is required by 
mature steers. In this country where 
■teers can be grown to maturity very 
cheaply by ranging in summer and feed- 
ing a little alfalfa in winter and where 
grain is always high it is well to sell 
mature stock to Kansas, Nebraska and 
Missouri feeders and finish up a certain 
per cent of baby beef each winter on the 
surplus alfalfa with a little corn and con- 
siderable sugar beets, beet pulp and tops 

If a little and a little more milk is left 
in a cow's udder at each milking the 
result will be a gradual drying up. On 
the other hand if the cow is milked abso- 
lutely clean and every drop is stripped 
from the udder each time the effect will 
be to make the cow give all the milk she 
is capable of producing. Clean milking 
pays and it also pays to have one person 
milk each individual cow regularly all the 
time. 

Dehorned steers are best for feeders. 
They are more quiet, can be kept in a 
■mailer lot and more of them be fed at 
each bunker than those with horns. In 
this a laving of equipment and labor in 
feeding is effected, besides making a 
uniform gain on the same amount of feed 
because the steers do not punch each 
Other all over the whole works. 



McMURRAY 




POINTS: 

Perfect Construction, 
Light Weights, 
Great Strength, 
Easy Running, 
And LOW PRICES, 

McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CAR I S 

STANDARD THK WORLD Ot KR 

3WAddress. for printed matter and prices. 

W. J. KENNEY 

Ml Valencia St . Nan t'mnrUrn, Cal. 




FOR SALE. 

THOROUGHBRED YEARLING COLTS 

Hy^lM C AT. out of - 1 nt>i. g i. r , ,| M>rri 

I...1LW.... 

TROTTING BRED 

YOUNG STALLIONS AND FILLIES 

HOTTIII AND PACKKS. 
THE SIRES OPTIIRSB COLTS ARE DIAHt.O. 

Nutwooi Wilkes, Moohells. Cupid and Sidney 
Dillon Tbealreaof their first, second and third 
dams are Guy Wilkes. Hock Wilkes, Director. 
Harold, Electioneer, Cornelius Paul's Abdallab. 
Venture. I-odl and St Clair. All of these sires 
trace In the male line to HamhletinttD 10th ough 
bis best producing male descendant*, excepting 
tbe thoroughbred* Venture ami f.odl and the 
I pacer St. Clair. 

C. E. KARNUM, M. D. 
.16 Parrot t Building 



RACING 



KICKING, 



talking. Shying or any 
kind of a habit cured 
In a few hours by my 
system. Particulars free. 

PIUlF .1 \ llr.F.RY. Plesoaot Mill. Ohio. 




Mckinney Mare For Sale. 

^OLID BAY MAKE WITH BLACK POINTS; 
1 * years old; sired by McKlnney 3:ll<<. dam by 
Sidney, second dam a producing mare by Chief- 
tain. This mare with little training bas worked 
miles In 2-.23H. quarters In SCH and eighths In IS 
seconds. Sbe is now In foal to Monterey. James 
Berryman and Grant Lapham loth declare that 
sbe is one of the most promising prospects they 
have ever seen. Sbe li absolutely sound, kind 
and gentle, and will be driven for speed for tbe 
benefit of prospective purchasers. Entered In 
Breeders »••••• Futurity Stake for foals of 100-1. 
Address EDWARD NEWLANDS. 1878 Webster 
Street, between 23d and -Mtn streets, Oakland. 
Telephone: Cedar 701. 



Ivy] 






IB 




M 






c ATnJ 






WIRE \ IRON 



19 FREMONT. ST. SAN FRAN 




ST. LOUIS FAIR ASSOCIATION. 

STAKE EVENTS FOR 1904. 

Entries Close September 1, 1904 

73 Days Racing* from Saturday. June 11th. 
to Saturday, September 3d. 



OAKLAND TRACK 

New California Jockey Club 

RACING 

Monday. Tuesda>. Wednesday. 
Thursday. Friday and Saturday. 

RAIN OR SHINE. 

SIX OR MORE RACES DAILY 

RACKS START AT 3:18 P. M. SHARP. 

For special trains stopping at the track take 
S I* Perry, fool of Market street, at It. I.' > I. 
1:30 or 3 o'clock 

No smoking In last two cars, which are reserved 
for ladles and their escorts. 

Returning, trains leave track at 4:10 and 4:41 
and Immediately after tbe last race. 

THOMAS H WILLIAMS, Preside** 
I'KRI ^ W TltFAT. Secretary. 



FOR SALE. 



\IY KNTIRE STOCK OP 81 
■ ' Trott Ing and Pacing Hora< 



Mi!' IIHF.D 
Ingle drivers 
iroapect* for 
int. Stanford 
and Breeders Futurity stakes. Tbe great brood 
mare Daisy S. (dam of Tom Smith * l.i v General 
Vailejo 3:30s. Sweet Rose 3:33 (trial 3:31) and 
LlllleMac (3)3:37). The driving horses and colts 
can be seen at my stable In Vailejo, and tbe 
broodmares, etc . at the race track Apply to or 
address THOMAS SMITH, Vailejo, Cal. 

JOHN H. DOWNEY 
Practical Horse Trainer 

A L A M F. I> A RACK TRACK. ALAMF.Kt. 

Will take horses to break or train for road or 
track. Best of references Has had twenty. Arc 
yeara' experience Four years with DuBois Bros . 
I Colorado. One rear at Palo Alto Farm Apply 
to or address JOHN H. DOWNEY, Alameds Hare 
Track, Alameda, California 

J. W. Zibbell's Training Stables 



Corner 



i'olnt I nbos Road and 20th Avenue 
San Francisco. 



$50,000 World's Fair Handicap 

To be Run Saturday. June 25. 1904, under the Rnles 
of the Western Jockey Club. 

This Stake which closed April 1, 1003, with 04 Nominations, will be reopened 
FKHKI AKY I, 11)04. mid entries accepted upon payment of •7AO 

*»~E.N"TRANC« ril MUST ACCOMPANY NOMINATIONS 

A 8WEKPST AKK8 for three year olds and upward in 1904 (foalsof 1901 and preceding years). Tbe 
St. Louis Fair Association guarantees tbe gross value to be JAO.OOO. of which 10000 to second and 
13000 to third, and tbe fourth to save Its stake Liabilities as follows: Two-year-olds at time of 
entry, by subscription of »-> each. April 1, 1903: t-V) additional If not declared by July I, 1903: t'b 
additional If not declared by Ootober 1. 1903; 1100 additional If not declared by February 1, 1004; 
1350 additional to start. Three-year-olds and upward at time of entry, by subscription of (AO 
eacb. April I. 1903. (75 additional If not declared by Ju.'y I, 1903; 1100 additional If not declared by 
October I, 1903: 1135 additional if not declared by February I, I9IM; (350 additional to start. 
The stake to be reopened February I, 1904, and en trlea accepted on that date upon payment of 
(750; 1350 additional to start. Weights to be published March 15,1904. A winner after publication 
of weights, of (1500 twice or (3500 once, penalized « lbs.: of 33500 twice or 34000 once, 9 lbs.: of 14000 
twice or 17000 once, 13 lbs.; if handicapped at 1 13 lbs or over, these penalties shall be reduced by one- 
third; at 130 lbs. or over by two-thirds; at 130 lbs or over there shall be no penalty In tbe case of 
three year olds, penalties shall not cause the weight to exceed 115 lbs .line Mile »nd a Quarter 

THE INAIOURAL 32000 Added. Entry fee 110. A handicap for three year- 

.Io.no llth olds and upward One Mile 

THE KI N DE K<; A KTK.N" (l.VKi Added. For two-year old colls and geldings Entry 

June IHth fee 110 Five Furlongs 

CLt H MEM HERS HANDICAP (.loo Added. A handicap for three year olds and upw ttr .| 

.lone IHth. Entry fee (10 . . One Mile and a Ouiiarter 

THK INDKPKSDKNCK (3>«X) Added For three-year olds and upward. Entry 

July 4th. fee (10 On* and Three sixteenths Miles 

JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIP «.-'»»i Added For two year olds. Entry fee (10 

.Inly 9th. 81 s Furlongs 

MIDSUMMER HANDICAP 11500 Added A handicap for three year olds and upward 

July Ifltli. Entry fee IU> One Mile and 7(1 yard. 

NATIVE NURSERY II.Mn Added. For two year olds foaled In Missouri The 

July 21st. produce of sire and dam owned In Missouri at date of 

breeding Entry foe IS Five Furlong. 

COUNTRY OU It Iimxi Added A handicap for three year-olds and upward 

July SOih. Entry fee 110 ... Six Furlongs 

MISSISSIPPI VALLEY 315m Added. A selling stake for three-year olds and ii] 

August 6th. ward. Entry fee ||0 One) Mil* 

AI'UI ST BKLI.INO (i.vxi Added. For three year-olds and upward. Entry 

August l.'lth fee 110 HI v Furlong. 

WILLIAM J. LKMP STAKE (15410 Added. A handicap for twoyenrolds Entry 

August 30th fee 110 tlx Furlong. 

I nilic IWhv fnr 1005 F.NTRIF.S FREE [Now Two-year-olds). Estimated 
M. LOUIS UCYOy IUT lyUO. Value. 8l»o«n. A sweepxtakos for three -vear-olds 
(foals of 1903); 175 each, or only (15 if declared July I. 1904, or IK) If declared January I. 1906; 1135 
additional to start: 37T/JO addod. of which (isno to secon i and 3750 to third, the fourth to save Its 
stake A winner of a sweepstakes of (3.V(ilnl9i6 or one of !5mo In 1904, 3 Iba ; or one of 3,VO0or 
three of any value in 1905. 5 lbs extra. Others, if non-winners of two sweepstake* of any value In 
1905 allowed 3 lbs.; of one at any time, 4 lbs additional; maldena 5 lbs additional 

One Mile Hud I. imif 

For additional particulars and Entry Blanks address 

JOHN II ACH M EISTER, Secretary, 

Fair (.rounds, St Louis, Mo. 

Awardetllinld M • ■ i , 
At CallforiilaNiatr 
Fair IH03. 

'ry tor *.e o w r.e r wl.o 
value* his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of It oo hand. It 
Improves and keeps 
.lock In the pink of 
condition. 

Manhattan Food Co 

RED BALL BRAND, am 

Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C. P. KF.KTELL, Manager. 



HORSES TRAINED FOR TRACK OR ROAD 
and satisfaction guaranteed Terms reason- 

able Horses bought and sold 'Phone Pine its* 



ABSORBING JR 




f 

Will remove the 
soreness from a 

r^BUNION 

And gradually absorb the bunch. 
Also unequalled in removing any 
buncli or bruise. Pleasant to use, 
nicely perfumed. 
$ I .OO i : bottle, by mail. 

M ANUFAOTVREn P V 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. f 

8PKINOFIJEU>, • • MASS. 

For sale bv Mack \- Co . Lanflevj* Mlebaela Co . 
Redlneton A Co , J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco 




Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK Ifin 
I -.'ft Cutler 
tni Frttrr . 
Fine Suit, 
(rem 

HS.M up 




Onl, Ine 

fc i Self 

Employe* . 
All work 
•one en the 
prenwei 



leGeer) si s f Hoenuio io Phone Grant 158 



TALES OF THE TURF 

71M Pages of Horse. 

Two Vnlmnra of 

FACTS -FICTION -FUN 

Vol I, FASK1S Contains 17 storle. written 
by William H. Ka and a Memoir. 314 
pages. Cloth. 

Vol. t WET *M NOAYS. provides samples of 
racing from the Orand Circuit to the bashes, 
a peep at t he galloper* and quarter horses, and 
the horse trader. Illustrated by Whitney 404 



pa 



.1! 



Price of end. s ',1'in.e, •a OO, or the two In uric 
order, S3 SO, all charges prepaid. Address 

Breeder and Sportsman, 

311 Oeary St , MAN FRANCISCO, Oal. 



11 



©he gvztbsv txnb &povt&man 



[J ANTj ARY 23, 1904 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of John Parbott, Esq.) 

Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

3igh Stepping 
Hackney-Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEAL.T, Manager, 




Dictatus Medium 32499 



Will make the coming season at 



Race Track, Hoi lister. Cal. 



FOR 



Jos Sanchez In charge 

THE SEASON. 



$40 

Payable at time of service, with usual return privilege. 
Every care taken to prevent accidents, but no responsibil- 
ity should any occur Prompt and careful attention in all 
cases Pasturage furnished to mares sent from a distance 
at $2 50 a month. 

A IMCTATI S MEDIUM PI RSE OF SIOO. 
1 will give a purse of SIOO, with entrance money added 
for a race, best two in threo. open to any and all colts from 
DICTATUS MEDIUM, the result of the breeding season of 1904, either pacers or trotters Must be 
three to start and race to oome off on Hoi lister track. Fair week, 1907. (Exact date to be hereafter 
announced ) $5 entrance money, payable June 1, 1905. W> thirty days before the race. Three 
moneys: 60 per cent to Brst horse; 30 per cent to second and 10 per cent to * h '/d. F or further par- 
ticulars, address K - ™ JLATIIKOl , Holllstrr. 

DESCRIPTION. 

DICTATUS MEDIUM is 6 years old, weighs 1220 pounds. A beautiful turned bay horse with 
heavy mane and tail, kind and gentle, with a perfect disposition. Good Bat heavy bone. He has 
great power and speed. Has a record of 2:24, but has worked out In 2:12. He is a horse that will go 
out any day and do his best. His colts are models of grace and beauty. Only one so far has been 
worked This one. Al Willson's yearling LITTLE MEDIUM, paced an exhibition H mile on the 
Holllster Race Track in 36H seconds, a 2:33 gait. This colt hasgreat promise. 

DICTATUS MEDIUM Is by Dictatus 2:17 one of the best bred and fastest horses ever brought to 
California. The dam of Dictatus Medium la Belle Medium (dam of Stam B. 2:11*), by Happy 
Medium, grandslre of the dam of Lou Dillon I&8K- His second dam is Argenta by Almont Light- 
ning, sireof the dam of Zombro 2:11. There is no doubt but Dictatus Medium will prove to be a sire 
of speed as well as good size, style and disposition. 



BAYSWATER WILKES 2:251 

Sire of KELLY BRIGGS 2:10* 



Sable Wilkes 2=18 

and 

Fanny Bayswater 

Dam of S in 2:30 



WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1904 AT 



WOODLAND, CAL. 



Fee $40. 

BAYSWATER WILKES is a sire of speed, size, good looks, soundness and gameness. Every 
one of his produce that has been trained can show standard speed. His sire, Sable Wilkes, also sired 
Nushagak, sire of Aristo, winner of the Occident and Stanford stakes. His dam, Fanny Bayswater, 
is the dam of Senator L., holder of the champion four-mile trotting record of 10:12. 

Breed to BAYSWATER WILKES and you will get colts that will sell at good prices. 

For cards containing full Pedigree and all particulars address 

S. H. HOY, Winters, Cal. 



SIDNEY DILLON 23157 



Sire 



(LOU DILLON 1:58V4 (the Fastest Trotter and Greatest Record Breaker in the world) 
of i Dolly Dillon 2:06& (the fastest mare of 1901), B. S. Dillon 2:16« and Captivity 2:284. 



SANTA ROSA STOCK FARM j 

SANTA ROSA, CAL. 

SIDNEY DILLON was sired by Sidney 
2:19^: dam Venus (dam of Adonis 2: 1 1 V4 . 
Leah 2:24M. Cupid 2:18 and Juno, the dam of 
Mercury 2:21 and Ida 2:30) by Venture 2:27M, . 
■Ire of dam of Directum 2:05* SIDNEY 
DILLON is a model of symmetry and im- 
parts his grand individuality, inherentspeed 
and excellent disposition to all his progeny. 

Terms for the Season, $100, 

Only a limited number of approved mares 
taken. Usual return privilege. In case horse 
is sold service fee will be returned if mares 
have not proven in foal. Season ends July 
1, 19iM. Pasturage ti per month. Best of 
care taken of mares, but no responsibility 
assumed for accidents or escapes For par- 
ticulars regarding shipment ot mares, etc , 
address FRANK TURNER, 

Supt. Santa Rosa Stock Farm, 

Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Or IRA PIERCE, 728 Montgomery St., S. F. 




THREE-YEAR-OLD 

2:I5J 



No. 23444 

STAM B. 



FOUR-YEAR-OLD 

2:111 



A Colt Trotter Himself, and His Produce Perform Early, and the Hlood of the Two- 
Mlnnte Trotters. Futurity and Horse Show Winners can be found In his Veins. 



WILL MA 
THE SEASON 



„ E From Feb. 15 to June 1, 1904, at PLEASANTON 

AFTER THAT DATE (by request) AT SALEM, OR. 

At 840 the Season, or $60 to insure. 



For further particulars address 



SAM I EL GAMBLE, Pleasanton Cal. 
Or TUTTLE BROS., Rocklln, Cal. 



Fast Paeer For Sale. 

THE PAGING GELDING, AL SANDY 2:19'^ 
by Wayland W., dam Rapid Ann by Overland. 
Can pace three heats better than 2:17. Can brush 
very fast on the road. Excellent prospect to raoe. 
He is one of the best road horses in the city. 
Gentle and intelligent. Safe for lady to drive. 
For price and further particulars address S. 
WATSON, 235 Douglas street, San Franolsoo. 



FOR SALE. 

DLACK TROTTING MARE, RECORD S:18X; 

standard bred; sound; nearly 16 hands high; 
weighs about 1100 pounds. Gentle and a high- 
class road mare. Can be bought cheap. To see 
the mare and for particulars call or address 
Telephone: Pine 1786 J. W. ZIBBELL, 

345 Twentieth Ave., San Francisco. 



The Fastest Trotting Son of McKinney 

KINNEY LOU 2:073 

(Winner of 1)11,450 In 1903) Will Make the Season of 1904, Limited to One Dozen 

Approved Mares, at 

AGRICULTURAL PARK, SAN JOSE. Service Fee, $100. 

SEASON ENDS MAT 1, 1904. 

KINNEY LOU was one of the great raoe winners of 1903 on the Grand Circuit, and is a high class 
race horse, game as a pebble and perfectly gat ted. He is from race winning; and producing families 
on both sides, his dam. Mary Lou 2:17, being a great race mare and own sister to the well-known race 
horses Shylock 2:15V4 and Ned Winslow 2:12fc. Mary Lou is by Tom Benton out of Brown Jenny (dam 
of 3 in list) by Dave Hill Jr . next dam by Black Hawk 766 Kinney Lou's oldest colts are two-year- 
olds and all have size, good color, and are natural trotters with good dispositions. 
For further particulars and card containing tabulated pedigree address 

BUUD DDBLE, 1030 Pacllic Ave Alameda, Cal. 
or San Jose, Cal. 



NUTWOOD-DIRECTOR AND WILKES STALLION 

Reg. No. 35562. Record 2:22 1-2. 

Sire of ALONE 2:09;.{, champion 4 y. o of 1903 
(half mile :59!«), OCR LADY (trial 2:20*), 
and full brother to JOBN A. McKERRON 2:044 
(the fastest trotter of the Wilkes family). 



NEAREST 



8 ?9 s o°4 n .1 Stables of T. W. Barstow 



on the Alameda 
near Race Trac 



k San Jose, Cal. 



By NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16H, sire of John A. McKerron 2:0414. Who Is It 2:10*, 8tanton Wilkes 
2:104. Claudius 2:13m, Georgie B. 2:12*, Bob Ingersoll 2:1431. Tidal Wave 2:13;, and 21 other standard 

performers. 

Dam INGAR, the greatest producing daughter of Director (dam of John A. McKerron 2M%, 
Nearest 2:2254 and Thursday 2:24) by the old champion Director 2:1", sire of Directum 2:05*, Direct 
2:0554, Direction 2:10*. etc ; second dam Annie Titus (dam of Annie C. 2:25) by Echo 462, sire of Echora 
2:2354 (dam of Direct 2:0554) and 16 others in list; third dam Tiffany mare (dam of Gibraltar 2:2254, 
sire of Our Dick 2:10*, Homestake 2:14* and others) by Owen Dale, son of Williamson's Belmont 

NEAREST is a dark bay, IA.3 hands and weighs 1200 pounds; well formed and of kind disposi- 
tion. In his blood lines are represented the greatest strains of the American trotter. 

Tormc tin ii\r triA Cpocnn Every precaution taken to prevent accidents or escapes, 
1 erill>, lur UlC OCasuu. but no liability assumed. All bills to be settled before 

mares are removed. For further particulars address 

Telephone: Red 1431. T. W. BARSTOW, San JOSG, Cal. 



If Tour Horse Could Road 

IT WOULD PLEASE HIM 

TO SEE HIS NAME IN THE PAPER 
AT THIS TIME OF THE YEAR. 



Owners of good Mires are carefully considering the merits of the 
Stallions that are brought to their attention, and all have ideaB in 
regard to what blood will nick best to produce the result they most 
desire, and they all want Colts from well-known Sires. 

Keep Your Horse Before the Public 

No Matter How Good He Is 



PRINTER'S INK PAYS 

ADVERTISE HIM 

And Commence Early in the Season. 

We will Write Your Advertising Matter for You if you 
will give us the main points as to where he will stand, the 
price and a description of him. Get His Card In the 
paper and his Picture with a Write-up. Itwilldo him good. 



STALLION SERVICE BOOKS, $1.00 
STALLION POSTERS 

STALLION FOLDERS 

STALLION CARDS 
PEDIGREES TABULATED, ETC., ETC. 

Breeder and Sportsman 

36 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



January 23, 1904] 



Cite ^u-ccocv anb $yjovtg »wai 



IB 



Parker Automatic Ejector SMITH GUNS 



The "Old Reliable's" 




Latest 
Attachment 

8rml for I atnlogue 



WIN 

LONGEST 
STRAIGHT RUNS 



N.'u Tork Salfurouni; 
Bl Warren St. 



NEW "E. C." 

NEW "SCHULTZE" 
SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 



PARKER BROS,, Meriden. Conn. 




At 8. F. Trap Shooting 
Association 

May %%— »S— ««— 90 
VACOHN, - - 78 Straights 

riiDNKK, - oa ■ 

AUo longest straight ran 
ami lint monies Rt live tilriU 




Catalog' on 

application to 



Hunter Arms Co., Fulton, N.Y. 

PHIL. B. BEKEART CO.. San Francisco. Coast Representative 



Du Pont Gun Powder 

SMOKELESS. SHOT GUN and 

MJXITAHY POWDEB 

Black Powder for Sporting and Blasting Purpose® 
The RepnUUioti ol a Hundred Y earn ia th« Guanuitee of 



Msaufactured 



» THE AMERICAN "E. C." and "SCHULTZE" Bunpowder Co., Ltd. 

PHIL II BEKFART CO. , PaclOo Coast Representative 



BALLISTITF 
The Standard Dense Powder of the World. ■»»■■■■■■■■ 

1901— Wins Second tn Grand American Handicap at Targets 

1903— Wins First In Grand American Handicap at Targets. 

1908 — Wins during Grand American Handicap week at Kansas City. 
Kirst Amateur Average in Regular Events. Third General Average in Regular Event 

Take No One's Word. Try It for Yourself. 

i u I Mi A rn 75 CHAMBERS ST., NEW YORK CITY 

\J • II ■ LMU OC V-> V_/ • Telephone 1747 Franklin. 

Importer* and Dealers In Fire Arms, Ammunition and Fencing Goods. 

Sole Agents for BALLISTITE (Dense) and EMPIRE (Bulk; Smokeless Powders 
and the REBLE GUN. 

A postal brings catalogue and "Shooting Facts" (third edition) 

BALLISTITF 
The Standard Dense Powder of the World. ■■■■ 




Ijoadod. Ira. O. HP. w/ . Smols.oloss. 
Winning" Higfhest Averagre at All Shoots. 



IF TOD WANT THE BEST A8K FOR 



California Powder Works 

FACTORY LOADED SHELLS. 

If Yonr Dealer don't keep them write the 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS — Office 330 Market St., San Francisco 

Manufacturers or HERCULES DYNAMITE. HERCULES OELATINE, CHAMPION 
IMPROVED BLASTING, BLACK BLASTING, BLACK SPORTING 
C. P. W. SMOKELESS and MILITARY SMOKELESS. 
Also sell CAPS and FUSE. 



HARNESS and SADDLES 



HIGH-CLASS 
FINISH AND 
WORKMANSHIP 
AT 

MODERATE 
PRICES. 



THE 

BIG STOKE 

JEPSEN 

1145-47 Market St. San Francisco 



C. A tlAIOBIT, A«<M>t. 



DU PONT POWDER 

819 Mission St., Boom 311, San Franclaoa, Cat 



SPRATTS PATENT. 



DOG 



CAKES 

REMEDIES 

SOAP. 



NEWARK, N. J. Send for free eopy of "DOG CULTURE." 8T LOUIS, MO. 

Parlflr Coast Branch— 1324 Valencia Street, San Franelsco. 

Agents for " SANITAS " Disinfectant. 




HIGH-CLASS PUPPIES 

Especially some Fine YOINt. HITCHES 

By Imp LENZIE PRINCE (winner of 17 First 
Prizes), Imp. BRAEHEAD COMMANDER and 
Imp. RIPPOWAN ARCHER. 

Studs are Workers, Prlre Winners, and sire wonderful 
workers and prljre winners 

GLEN TANA FARM KENNELS , ™ B **MS!™ 

SPOKANE. WASH. 



COLLIBS. 




CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Advertisement! under thii head one cent per word 
Ver insertion. Cath to accompany order. 



"... CHAMPION HANOVER MONARCH 

(A. K. C. 8. H. 0998) by the great sire Ch. 
Ellwyn Astrologer from Ch Old Hall Moon 
Fee VIA. Pictures and Pedigree upon applica- 
tion. High-class Puppies for sale. 




AT STUD 

CUBA Or- KENWOOD 

(Qlenbeigh Jr.-Htella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II) 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

B. M. DO DO E, Manager, 
Hakersfleld, Kern Co., 
Boarding Pointer Puppies and well brokei 
Dogs for sals 



QOCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK. CHICKENS AND PKJS 

FOR SAM IS LOTS TO SUIT IT 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CQ 

SOS California Street, San Francisco, Cat, 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



-DBALBHR IS 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 

Tai.arnoKi Mils 1W 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TF.RRIERS. 

TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIER PUPPIES 
1 at 112 and IIS Sired by Champion Loyna 
Ruffian and Champion Fighting Mao. Mm, 

BRADLEY-DYNE. Saturna P O B. C. 



COLLIES. 

pOLLIE PUPS FOR SALE— BY PRIZE 
s-^ winning Imported aires and dams, (It for 
bench, ranch or farm Both sexes Prices accord- 
ing to quality. Correspondence solicited: all let- 
ters cheerfully answered THOS. S. GRIFFITH. 
Box 1007, Spokane, Wash. 



ROSE HOTEL 

PLEAS AN TON. CAL. 

Enlarged, Rebuilt Twenty live New Rooms 
Newly Furnished. Elortrle Lights, 
Running Water Up to date 
A. S. OLNKY A SON - - Proprietors 

Chronic Rronchltit and Catarrh ol (he Bladder 

Cored In 4fl Honrs. 



J 



CAPS ULES 



Superior to Copaiba, Co babe or Injeotlwa 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Ready lor framing. 
Writ* lor prleea. 

BnaaDBH a an SpoaraiiAa, a) Qoary Street, 
•an fra— U no. Oal. 



16 



(Khs ^rceDcir tint* gyoYtvmau 



[Januartt 23 i»04 




U. M. C. AT SEA GIRT, § 



i 



* 



f 




the annual military shoot, won the Wim- 
bledon Cup, Capt. Richards, Ohio, score 
91-100. 

Troop A, of New York, won the 
Revolver Team Match, using U. M. C. 
.38 S. & W. special cartridges, score 849. 

Leech Cup Match, shot at 800, 900, 
and 1000 yards, was also won with 
U. M. C. .30=40 cartridges, by C. B. Winder, 
Ohio, score 94=105. 

T he Thomas Bullet 

now used in all U. M. C. .30 Government 
cartridges was used by practically every 
rifleman in every match where Government* 
made ammunition was not required. These 
facts speak volumes for U. M. C. military 
and big game cartridges. 

U. M. C. .30-40 cartridges won the International 
J'alnia Trophy at KUlry, Knglanri, Bjrninnl th» mlliiary 
rllle teams of the world 




The Union Metallic Cartridge Company 



X Agency, 313 BROADWAY, 

NEW YORK CITY. 



Bridgeport. Conn. 



Depot, 86-88 FIRST ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

K. E. DRAKE, Mgr. 



i 
I 
i 



I 



i 

i 

l 

§ 




REPEATING SHOT GUNS 



A CHANCE FOR A DOUBLE 

A QUESTION often asked about Repeating Shotguns if, "How quick can a second shot befired with 
them?" Shooters that have used Repeaters answer with one accord: "Doubles" are just as easy to 
make with a WINCHESTER REPEATING SHOTGUN as they are with a double barreled 
gun. The third shot that a Winchester Rapeater gives often bags a badly crippled bird which otherwise 
would get away. Winchester Repeating Shotguns are made in "Take Down" styles in 12 and 16 gauge. 




Clabrough, Golcher & Go, 



RUNS 
Gun Goods 



JW3end (or Catalogue. 




FISHING 

Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



DU PONT 

M E. C." 
SOHULTZE 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 



FACTORY ... CUT! I O 
LOADED . OnLL LO 

SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BA1XISTITE 
LAFLIN Sc RAND 
' INFALLIBLE " 



What More do von Want? 



f J ANUARY 30, 1904 



KANSAS CITY JOCKEY CLUB 

AND FAIR ASSOCIATION. 
ELM RIDGE 

SPRING MEETING, 1904. 

Commencing April 30th and Closing May 2 1st, 1904. 



STAKES TO CLOSE MARCH 1, 1904. 



THE KANSAS CITY DERBY — 9)50 oo Added. A sweep- 
stakes for three-year-olds (foals of 19(11). $15 to accompany nom- 
ination and |l8t additional to start. $5000 added, of which $1(100 to 
lo second, $500 to third, and fourth to save starting fee Weights, 
eolts 1 19. geldings 116 and Allies 114. The winner of two three- 
year-old races of the value of each to the winner, to carry 5 
pounds penalty. Starters In 1904 that are non-winners of a three- 
year-old race of the value of $2000 or of two of the value of $1000 
each to the winner, allowed 5 pounds. Maidens 10 pounds One 
Mud une-<i<i«rter tulles. 

THE MISSOURI HANDICAP-SIJ500 Added. A handicap 

sweepstakes for three-year-olds (foals of 1901). $5 to accompany 
nomination and $50 additional to start $1500 added, of which $300 
to second, $1,50 to third, and fourth to save starting fee. Weights 
to be announced three days before the race. Winner of a race after 
the announcement of weights, 5 pounds extra, selling race ex- 
cepted. One mile. 

THE SWOI'K PARK STAKES - »8000 Added A sweep- 
stakes for two-year-olds (foals of 19021 $5 to accompany nomina- 
tion and $50 additional to start. $.'11110 added, of which $300 to 
second. $150 to third, and fourth to save starting fee. The winner 
of one race of the value of *•>>! or of two of the value of $1000 
each to the winner, to carry 5 pounds penalty, selling races ex- 
cepted Non-winners of one race of the value of $1000. or of two 
the value of $400 each, allowed 3 pounds Non-winners of a race 
of the value of $400 allowed 5 pounds. Maidens 10 pounds. Selling 
race exoepted Five furlongs. 

THE KANSAS CITY JOURNAL STAKES— S1200 Added. 

A sweepstakes for two-year-old colts and geldings (foals of 1902). 

II ENOUGH JUMPING HORSES 



$5 to accompany nomination and $50 additional to start. $1200 
added, of wnich $200 to seoond,$lo0 to third, and fourth to save 
starting fee. The winner of a race of the value of $1000 to carry 3 
pounds; of two or more. 5 pounds extra. Non-winner of a race of 
the value of $50u, or of two value of $400 each, allowed 3 pounds. 
Ma'dens 8 pounds. Selling race excepted. Four and one-half 
furlongs 

THE BABY STAKES— 91300 Added. A sweepstakes for 
two-year old fillies (foals of 1902). $5 to accompany nomination 
and $50 additional to start $1200 added, of which $200 to second, 
$100 to third, and fourth to save starting fee. The winner of a 
race of the value of $1000 to carry 3 pounds; of two or more. 5 
pounds extra Non-winners of a race of the value of $500 or of 
two value of $400 each, allowed 3 pounds. Maidens 8 pounds. 
Selling race excepted. Four and one-half furlongs. 

THE ELM RIBGB H ANDICA P— 98000 Added. A handi- 
cap sweepstakes for three year-olds and upwards $10 to ac- 
company nomination and $50 additional to start $35110 added, of 
which $500 to second, $250 to third, and fourth to save starting fee. 
Weights to be announced three days before the race Winner of a 
race after the announcement of weights to carry 5 pounds penalty, 
selling race excepted. One and one-eighth mile. 

THE COUNTRY CLUB HANDICAP— 8J2O0O Added A 

handicap sweepstakes for three-year olds and upward. $5 to ac- 
company nomination and $50 additional to start. $2uoo added, of 
which $400 to second, $200 to third, and fourth to save starting fee. 
Weights to be announced three days before the race. Winners of 
a race after the announcement of weights, 5 pounds extra, gelling 
race excepted. One and three-sixteenths mile 
ARE HERE, JUMPING RACKS WILL BE INTERSPE 



THE HUNT AND POLO CLUB STEEPLECHASE 
HANDIC\P-Sir,oo Added A handicap sweepstakes for 
i^ ee ;-5f.* r ' 0l( ? s and u P w » rd * 5 'o accompany nomination and 
$.>0 additional to start $1501 added, of which $300 to second $150 
to third, and fourth to save starting fee. Weight- 10 be announced 
three days before the rac- . Winners of a race after the announce- 
ment of weights, 5 pounds extra, selling race excepted Four or 
more horses of entirely different interests, or the race will be de- 
cared off. Starters to be named through the entry-box at the 
usual time of closing of this day's racing, and those so named are 
liable for the starting fee. Full course, about two and one- 
quarter miles. 

THE STAR-TIMES HANDICAP-SI 300 Added. A handi- 
cap sweepstakes for three-year-olds and upward. $5 to accompany 
nomination and $50 additional to start $1200 added, of which $200 
to second $100 to third, and fourth to save starting fee Weights 
to be announced three days before the race. Winners of a race 
afier the announcement of weights, 5 pounds extra selline race 
excepted. Six furlongs. 

THE KANSAS CITY WORLD SELLING STAKE8-S1300 
Added A selling sweepstakes for three-year olds and upward 
$5 10 accompany nomination and $5(1 additional to start $1206 
added, of which $250 to second, $100 to third, and fourth to save 
starting fee. The winner to be sold at auction for $3500 If for 
less, 3 pounds allowed for each $500 to $2000, and one pound for 
each $100 less to $500. Starters and selling price to be named 
through the entry-box the usual time of closing for this day's 
racing, and those so named are liable for the Parting fee 
Fifteen-sixteenths mile. 

RSED THROUGH EACH WEEK. 



The full value of all stakes will be paid in cash. Liberal Overnight Events with attractive conditions. No Purse less than $500. 

NOTICE TO NOMINATORS— In Selling Sweepstakes more than two can be nominated, but only two can start. 

Entranco Fees Must Accompany Nominations. 

SPECIAL NOTICE — No entry will be received for any of these stakes except upon this condition: That all disputes, claims and objections arising out of the 
racing, or with respect to the interpretation of the conditions of any race, shall be decided by a majority of the Executive Committee present, or those B whom thev 
miy appoint, and their decisions upon all points shall be final. 

The Club also reserves the right to refuse the entries of any person, or the transfer of any entry, and without notice. 

Address all communications to the Secretary 

KANSAS CITY JOCKEY CLUB AND FAIR ASSOCIATION, 
664 Gibraltar Bnilding, Kansas City, Mo. 



ST. LOUIS FAIR ASSOCIATION, 

STAKE EVENTS FOR 1904. 

Entries Close September 1, 1904. 

73 Days Racine: from Saturday, June 11th, 
to Saturday, September 3d. 



$50,000 World's Fair Handicap 

To be Run Saturday. June 25, 1904, under the Rules 
of the Western Jockey Club. 

This Stake which closed April 1, 10f!3, with 1)4 Nominations, will be reopened 
FEBRUARY 1, I 'mi I. and entries accepted upon payment of S7oO. 

•S-ENTRA.NCE FEB MUST ACCOMPANY NOMINATIONS. "CO. 

A SWEEPSTAKES for three-year-olds and upward in 1904 (foals of 1901 and preceding years). The 
St. Louis Fair Association guarantees the gross value to be $50,000. of which $6000 to second and 
$2000 to third, and the fourth to save its stake. Liabilities as follows: Two-year-olds at time of 
entry, by subscription of $25 each. April 1, 1903: $50 additional if not declared by July 1, 1903: $75 
additional If not declared by October I, 1903; 1100 additional if not declared by February 1, 1904; 
$250 additional to start. Three-yuar-olds and upward at time of entry, by subscription of $50 
each. April 1. 1903. $75 additional if not declared by July 1, 1903; $100 additional if not declared by 
October 1, 1903; $125 additional if not declared by February 1, 1904; MO additional to start. 
The stake to be reopened February 1, 1904, and entries accepted on that date upon payment of 
$750; $250 additional to start. Weights to be published March 15, 1904. A winner after publication 
of weights, of $1500 twice or $1500 once, penalized 6 lbs.: of $2500 twice or $4000 once, 9 lbs.: of $4000 
twice or $7000 once, 12 lbs.; if handicapped at 112 lbs. or over, these penalties shall be reduced by one- 
third; at 120 lbs. or over by two-thirds; at 130 lbs or over there shall be no penalty In the case of 
three-year-olds, penalties shall not cause the weight to exceed 115 lbs ...One Mile and a Quarter 
THE INADGDBAL $2000 Added. Entry fee $10. A handicap for three-year- 
Jane 11th olds and upward One Mile 

THE KISDEROARTEN $1500 Added. For two-year-old colts and geldings Entry 

June 16th fee$IO Five Furlongs 

CLCB MEM HERS H ANDICAP $3000 Added. A handicap for three-year olds and upward. 

June 18th. Entry fee$l0 One Mile and a Ouuarter 

THE INDEPENDENCE $2000 Added. For three-year-olds and upward. Entry 

July 4th. fee $10 One and Three-sixteenths Miles 

JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIP $2000 Added For two-year-olds. Entryfee$10 

July 9th. 8Ix Furlongs 

MIDSUMMER HANDICAP $1500 Added. A handicap for three-year-olds and upward. 

July 16th. Entry fee $10 -..One Mile and TO yards 

NATIVE NURSERY $1500 Added. For two-year-olds foaled in Missouri. The 

July 8 1st. produce of sire and dam owned in Missouri at date of 

breeding Entry fee $5 Five Furlongs 

COUNTRY CLUB $l5oo Added A handicap for three-year-olds and upward. 

July soih. Entry fee $10 Six Furlongs 

MISSISSIPPI VALLEY $1500 Added. A selling stake for three-year-olds and up- 
August 8th. ward. Entry fee $10 One Mile 

AUGU8T SELLING $1500 Added. For three-year-olds and upward. Entry 

August 13th fee $10 Six Furlongs 

Will [AM. I LEMP STAKE .$1500 Added. A handicap for two-year-olds Entrv 

August 20th fee $10 Six Furlong 

<st I rtllic fWhv for lQfl^ ENTRIES FREE (Now Two-year olds). Estimated 
pi. l.wui . L»CI U} IUI iyvo. Value. S16.UOO. A sweepstakos for three-vear -olds 
(foals of 19;>2); $75 each, or only $15 if declared July I, 1904, or $10 It declared January 1. 1905; $125 
additional to start; $7530 added, of which $1500 to secon 1 and $750 to third, the fourth to save its 
■take A winner of a sweepstakes of $3500 In 1905 or one of $5000 In 1904, 3 lbs ; or one of $5000 or 
three of any value In 1905, 5 lbs. extra. Others, if non-winners ..f two sweepstakes of any value In 
1905 allowed 3 lbs.; of one at any time, 4 lbs additional; maidens 5 lbs additional. 

One Mile and a Half 

For additional particulars and Entry Blanks address 

JOHN HACHMEISTER, Secretary, 

Fair Grounds, St. Louis, Mo. 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY 



BEST REMEDY 



EVER USED ON HORSES' FEET. 

IT PENETRATES and DRIES IN quickly and DOES 
NOT GUM and FILL UP THE PORE8 like tar and oil 
compounds. It is the GREATEST REMEDY ever used to 
remove SORENESS and FEVER from the foot, and makes it 
possible to get good services out of a horse working on hard 
and hot pavements 

It gives natural nourishment to the foot and incites a 
rapid, healthy growth— ALL DRYNESS AND BRITTLE- 
NESS quieklv disappears. 

QUARTER CRACKS and SAND CRACKS are rapidly 
grown out when directions given in our booklet are followed. 

It is a SURE CURE for CORNS, CONTRACTED FEET 
and NAIL WOUNDS if directions are followed 

It PRESENTS SOUND FEET FROM HECOMING UN- 
SOUND and GROWS a TOUGH. STRONG. ELASTIC WALL 
and HEALTHY FROG— A FOOT WHICH WILL STAND 
WORK on race courses. 

Many of the best owners and trainers state that for track 
work nothing equals It. In many cases horses have reduced 
their records several seconds, due lo Its use. 

It Is a CER'J AIN CURE for THRUSH and SCRATCHES 
We Guarantee That It Will Do What We Claim 
and Will Refund Money If It Falls. 

PRICES:-Quarts. $100; Half-Gallon, $1.75; Gallon, $3 00; 
•2H-Gallon, $5.50; Five-Gallon, $10.00. 
Books giving full directions for Its use and much valuable information as to shoeing are supplied 

!. 

Don't fail to read "ad." giving information concerning Campbell's Iodoform Gall Cure in next 
Issue of this paper. It is the best and because of its merits is rapidly displacing all others. 

JAS. B. CAnPBELL&CO . Manufacturers. 4 1 2 W.nadison St., CHICAdO, ILL 

Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask them to write any Jobber for it 




free. 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-five years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished In Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 




PERGHERON AND BELGIAN STALLIONS 

"".E"2S2.'#ffif" Cedar Rapids (Iowa) Jack Farm 

Three importations this season of prize-winning Percherons, Belgians 
and German Coachers and Catalan Spanish and Majorca Jacks. I have 
the largest Draft and Coach Horses in America, and will sell more quality 
for the money than yeu can find anywhere 

Remembor, the largest sale of Imported and High-Bred Jacks ever 
held in America will take place at the Cedar Rapids Jack Farm some 
time duriag the first half of April, 1904. Watch for date. 

W. L. DE CLOW. 



January 30, 1U04J 



C?hc gu-ecfcev mitt &v &v t &mat\ 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

r. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority ot the Pacific Coast, 

— omci— 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
Tki.sphoni: Black B86. 



Terms— One Year S3. Six Month* »1.7R. Three Moiithn <i I 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money anould be seat by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kb.lit, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
tddress. not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 30, 1004. 



Stallions Advertised. 

TROTTIMi BJUD. 

ARNER 31300 C. A. Branln. San Lorenzo 

BAYSWATER WILKES 2:2SJ< S H. Hoy, Winters 

BONNIE DIRECT fc05>« C. L. Griffith. Pleasanton 

BONNIE STEINWAY C. L. Griffllh. Pleasanton 

DICTATCS MEDIUM 324W R. P Lathrop, Hoi lister 

KINNEY LOD *0TJi Budd DoMe, San Jose 

LECCO 2:09* Ed Mills. Pleasanton 

MONTEREY £09J< P. J. Williams, San Loren?o 

NEAREST i:23V4 T. W. Haretow, San Jose 

NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16* Martin Carter, Irvlngton 

SEARCHLIGHT 2:03!< Ed Mills, Pleasanlcn 

SIDNEY DILLON 18157 Frank Turner, Santa Rosa 

STAM B. 2:IIM Samuel Gamble, Pleasanlcn 



THE REQUEST OF THE AMATEURS to be per- 
mitted to charge gate receipts to their meetirgs, 
and at the same time have no records given the 
horses that win amateur events, was denied by the 
Advisory Board and the question will probably not 
come up before the Board of Reviews when it meets 
in New York next month. This questicn of records 
has bothered the amateurs for a long time and they 
think it unjust that some p an cannot be devised by 
which they can race their horses among themselves 
without incurring the penalties of records. How- 
ever the Ad visory Board acted right in the matter 
and will be upheld in the decision by horsemen gener- 
ally. The trouble with nearly all amateurs is that 
they want to eat their cake and have it too. Nine 
out of ten of them want all the glory they can possi- 
bly get out of driving a horse a fast mile, 
yet they desire to escape the penalties that 
naturally follow. It would be a rank injustice to 
horse breeders and trainers if the wealthy amateurs 
were permitted to give their horses all the experience 
of actual racing that the matinee plan undoubtedly 
furnishes, and after demonstrating to a certainty 
that they were capable of trotting or pacing three 
successive heats in company in 2:15 or better, and 
then enter them in the green or slow classes on the 
regular circuit where stakes and purses are offered. 
The plea that the amateur owner is only racing for 
glory does not seem to be an honest one when he de- 
sires to enter a horse in the M. <fc M. $10,000 stake for 
2:23 class trotters after he has won several amateur 
races where the heats were all trotted [a better than 
2:15. If an amateur is a true sportsman he will be 
perfectly willing to enter his horse only in the classes 
to which he is eligible by the amateur as well as the 
professional records. The trotting turf could Dot 
ha ve a more serious blow struck it than to permit 
amateurs to charge admission fees to their meetings 
and at the same time avoid records made by their 
horses. 

ALFONSO 2:293, son of the great stallion Baron 
Wilkes and of the still greater mare Alma 
Mater, was sold at auction in Chicago last week for 
9750. Alfonso was foaled in 1886, being therefore 
eighteen years old. Grandly bred as he is, his success 
in the stud has not beet such as would cause him to 
take high rank among the sires of to-day. He is the 
aire of but eighteen performers, the fattest being 
the trotting mare Alfonso Maid 2: 1 2 j that took her 
record this year. She is his only 2:15 performer, the 
next fastest being Marie C. 2:16J. But three have 
records better than 2:20. These few facts will show 
why a stallion by Baron Wilkes out of Alma Mater, 
probably the greatest of broodmares, brought only 
$750 at auction. 



THE DROUTH in the southern part of Californi 
has assumed a most serious aspect and unless 
rain falls there within the next two weeks thousands 
of cattle and sheep will doubtless perish in the dis- 
trict south of Bakersfield. On the coast from Mon- 
terey louth there is also a great need of rain and 
efforts are being made by owners of cattle to have 



the quarantine raised that thoy may ship their cattle 
north. That section has been aflllcted with Texas 
fover and a quarantine established against it by the 
authorities. Cattle can now be removed If they are 
inspected officially and found clean, but alter January 
31st this privilege expires. There are between 400,- 
000 and 500,000 head of cattle in the drouth stricken 
distrii-t and unless rain comes within two weeks they 
will have to be moved or die. 



Answers to Correspondents. 

L. C. G., Modesto — I would like for you to get me 
the name and the breeding of a thoroughbred horse 
that made the season at Davton, Nevada, In the year 
1877. 

Answer — We have no record of horses standing In 
Nevada that long ago. Perhaps some of our readers 
may bo able to give this information. Probably the 
best way to get the facts would be to consult the files 
of tho Dayton papers if any were published in that 
year. 

J. O'Grady, Seattle — Please give the pedigree of 
Deborah by Sable Wilkes through your columns? 

Answer— Deborah 2:21 J, bay mare, foaled 1890, star, 
black points. Sire Sable Wilkes, dam Sproule by Lo 
G ran 3e 2868, second dam May Sproule (dam of Mar- 
garet 2:28) by The Moor 870, third dam the Belmont 
mare, said to be by Williamson's Belmont. Deborah 
is standard and registered. 



Lou Dillon's Future Trials. 

It is unofficially stated that Mr. Billings intends 
starting the trotting queen to the Maud S. sulky, 
which Mr. Robert ES. Bonner tendered him recently, 
and over the Cleveland track with exactly the sane 
pace used back in 1885. This would mean that tie 
pacemaker mustdraw a high-wheel sulky orcart. 

It is also stated that the Chicago gentleman intends 
to start the mare with pace at the side, rather than 
preceding her at the pole. He may or may not do this. 
Those who stop a moment and consider that he 
brought Lou Dillon to New York, used her over a 
crowded roadway like our Speedwav, and to a frail 
wagon, will recognize the fact that when he assumes 
control of any horse he does not keep it under glass 
or give hothouse care. He is a horseman par excel- 
lence, fearing absolutely nothing, and those who 
know Lou Dillon recall her fractious days when the 
close observers considered her worthless to race, as 
she would not be rated at the score. 

We may soe Lou Dillon at the pole, too, if the owner 
so elects, although r o one could select a trotter capa- 
ble of keeping the clip she would set. All this may 
be on the tapis, yet till Mr. Billings gets ready to plan 
Lou Dillon's schedule for 1904, nothing official will be 
given out. It is useless prophesying as to her 
eventual record, as none know how fast she can trot. 
Charlie Tanner said that he had timed a trotter a 
quarter in 26) seconds, and what other could it have 
been? — Trotter and Pacer. 



Not Hambletonian's Son. 

It having been stated that the stallion Orange 
Blossom 2:26}, now 37 years old, is a son of Hamble- 
tonlan 10 the Richmond iHxpatck makes this cor- 
rection:. 

"An erroneous item is now going the rounds of the 
turf press to the effect that Orange Blossom 2:26J, 
owned by Hon. H. B. Holton, of Powhatan, Md., is by 
Hambletonian 10, some of them giving him as the 
oldest living son of that famous progenitor, when the 
fact is, he was sired by Middlotown, son of Hamble- 
tonian 10; dam Nelly Post by American Star 14. The 
bay stallion was foaled in 1867, is still alive and ap- 
parently in good health, although he has reached the 
ad vanced ago of 37 years. 1 1 



Tho introduction of fifty-pound wagons for speed- 
way work has revolutionized the mounted policeman's 
art of stopping runaways on the road. To snatch a 
horse by the head and bring him up with a sharp 
turn, like a cowboy roping a steer, Is nowadays moro 
dangerous to the occupant of one of these feather- 
weight pneumatics than to let tho horse run, ns the 
wagon is instantly overturned and the driver pitched 
out. The clever men of the speedway squad have 
learned to slow tho runaway horse down gradually, 
after nabbing him, and always keep him going 
straight if possible until brought to a standstill, In 
order to avoid overturning the wagon. 



In spite of the dullness of the export market in 
pedigree trotters, the National Trotting Association 
issued 89 certificates last jear. Of course there were 
a large number of trotting bred roadsters and car- 
riage horses exported for which no certificates were 
taken, as they were not intended for racing or breed- 
ing purposes. 

Jackson's Napa Soda It sold in every oltjr, town 
and hamlet in the State. 



One of the Sidney Family. 

Stallions carrying the blocd of Sidney will receive 
an increased patronage this year. The wonderful 
flights of speed shown by Lou Dillon have furnished 
the evidence that the ad mirers of the Sidney family 
have been looking for to prove their theory that Sid- 
ney is one of the greatest sires that ever lived and for 
his opportunities the greatest of the Strathmore 
family. Now that a son of Sidney has sired the 
fastest trotter in the world, other sons of Sidney will 
doubtless be patronized by breeders who have rather 
given them tho go-by in the past. For several years 
tho Rhkeiikh and Sportsman has advised breeders 
to not overlook Monterey 2:09J, son of Sidney ard 
the great mare Battle (dam also of Montana 2:16) by 
Commodoro Belmont. Monterey is a large, handsome 
horse with that magnificent high action that the 
majority of intelligent breeders now consider neces- 
sary In a great sire. And then Monterey is a race 
horse. He has demonstrated that he can trot heat 
after heat and not get "that tired feeling" which so 
many alleged race horses experience after a fast mile 
or two. Mr. P. J. Williams, his owner, is confident 
that, in shape, Monterey can closely press Cresceus' 
great two-mile record of 4:17. Monterey Jr., a very 
handsome three year old owned in Humboldt county, 
got a race record last year of 2:24 J and a three; ear 
old colt called Irish by Monterey, showed a trial in 
2:15 last year on one of the eastern training tracks, 
and will be raced this year. 

We advise breeders to write to Mr. Williams for a 
tabulated pedigreeof Monterey and arrange for book- 
ing some of their mares. He is the fastest bod o' Sid. 
ney and his son is a great broodmare. 



Los Angeles Matinee. 

Good racing and a large attendance made the 
matinee of the Los Angeles Driving Club last Satur 
day a complete success. The program was one of 



the best given by the club for some time. The sum- 
maries are as follows: 
First race — 

Mr. Mott's Zealous I s i 

Mr. Adoock's Neerblrd 8 1 3 

Mr. Snowden's Nell 2 3 2 

Tlme-2:3H, 2:37. 2:34. 

Second race — 

Dr. Hryson's George B | l 

Mr. Snowden's Rondow S 3 

Mr. Needham's Cblcora (ilrl I 2 

Time— 2:22'i, 2:23tf. 

Third race- 
Mr. Block's Maud ; I 1 

Mr. Smith's Dlrectus , 2 3 

Mr. Budlnger's Glen 3 2 

Time-2:23!i, 2:23V4- 

Fourth race. Free for all pace- 
Mr. Cocke's Billy K I I I 

Mr. Cunningham's L. W 3 1 I 

Mr. Heller's Eleotra 2 3 2 

Mr. Spooner's Wood B 4 4 4 

Tlme-J:18',i, 2:17, 2:22. 

Fifth race- 
Mr. Canfleld's Chlno 1 I 

Mr. Myer's Roan Dlak 2 2 

Mr. Spooner's Grry Bess 3 3 

Tlm«-2:32, 2:3ltf. 



Bonnie Direct 2:05 1-4. 

This superb stallion will be in the stud at Pleasan- 
ton again this year to a limited number of approved 
mares at $100 the season. Bonnie Direct, as all horse- 
men know, is not only one of tho fastest pacers of tho 
Direct family, but he is probably the most perfectly 
formed horseever sired by the great Direct. His dam 
Bon Bon 2:26 by Simmons was also the dam of that 
handsome mare Bonsilene 2:14), and came from a 
family that was endowed with good looks for genera- 
tions. The oldest of Bonnie Direct's get are two- 
yoar-olds, of which thoro are three now at Pleasan- 
ton, as well as three yearlings. They aro all from 
differently bred dams, and show that Bonnie Direct 
getshandsomo foals from all kinds of mares. They 
have more finish than the got of any of tho Director 
family we have yet Been, and are large, handsorr.o 
and with great natural speed. 

Mr. Griffith has also in the stud at Pleasanton the 
young stallion Bonnie Steinway, a four-year-old by 
Steinway out of Bon Bon, dam of Bonnie Direct. 
This stallion will stand at a fee of 925, a very low 
figure when his individuality and breeding are taken 
into consideration. 

Mr. Griffith has issued a very neat pamphlet giving 
the tabulated breeding of those horses, together with 
a lot of interesting facts about the records of their 
ancestors, which will bo sent on application. See the 
advertisement in this issue. 



Thoroughbreds have curious histories sometimes. 
Hands Across was one of the best looking and best 
bred sons of Hanover ever sold at auction in this 
country. He was bought for $14,000 when two years 
old, but ho fell sick soon after and never won a dollar 
until a week or so ago when he took down first money 
In a purse at New Orloans. 



1 



[January 30, 1804 



JOTTINGS. |Jj 



THE SECRETARY of each district fair association 
in California should make an effort to get his 
board of directors together at an early dale and de- 
cide whether or not the association will givea harness 
race meeting this year. There is a condition existing 
at the present time in regard to a circuit that associ- 
ations must take into consideration and act upon 
without further delay, or they will be left "off the 
map" and not be able to get enough entries to make 
a meeting profitable. Three good meetings are cer- 
tain. They will be the Pleasanton meeting, the 
Breeders meeting and the State Fair. Pleasanton 
will give the first meeting on the circuit. This has 
been fully decided upon by the now association formed 
there and it is only delaying the announcement of its 
date to give other places an opportunity to get in 
line. The Breeders, on account of its four colt stakes, 
desires to make its date as late as possible and yet 
precede the State Fair, and if no other associations 
claim dates, these meetings will be held in August, to 
be followed by the State Fair at Sacramento and then 
all the leading stables of horses will be shipped North 
fo race for the big purses and stakes that will be hung 
up by the Oregon State Fair at its meeting at Salem. 
It is learned from Mr. Thos. Smith that Vallejo will 
give a meeting this «year with two or three stakes of 
$1000 each and a good program of $500 purses, but its 
date has not yet been claimed, nor its meeting author- 
itatively announced. Napa is inclined to give a meet- 
ing but it is in the same shape as Vallejo so far as 
official announcement is concerned. Woodland has 
made no announcement at all, but the horsemen living 
there say that a meeting will probably be held on the 
usual dato, which is the week before the State Fair. 
Now, if these associations would only get a move on, 
claim dates and announce that meetings will be held, 
the Pleasanton association and the Breeders will 
arrange their dates in accordance with a plan that 
will make the circuit most convenient for horsemen. 



If Woodland will claim the week prior to the State 
Fair and officially announce the fact, the Breeders 
will take the week preceding Woodland ; Napa and 
Vallejo and Petaluma can come in before the Breeders 
meeting, and Pleasanton open the circuit sometime 
in July. This will give a circuit about as follows: 

Pleasanton, week ending July 23. 

Pdtalumi, week ending July 30. 

Napa, week ending August 6. 

Vallejo, week ending August 13. 

Breeders, week ending August 20. 

Woodland, week ending August 27. 

State Fair, two weeks ending September 10. 



This will give eight weeks of racing before the 
Oregon State Fair opens and give all the best Cali- 
fornia and Oregon strings achanceto race here befoie 
going North. 

Now, uiless tb.3 California associations that desire 
to get into the circuit this year select dates and an- 
nounce tlie fact before the Pleasanton and Breeders 
associations close their stakes on March let, then 
those two associations will in defense of their best in- 
terests be compelled to select the last two weeks in 
August as the dates for their meetings, and other 
associations will have to take dates prior to that 
time if they desire to secure the leading stables for 
their meetings. 

It will not cost a cod for an association to claim a 
date and say that it will give a meetinr;. The 
Breedkr and Sportsman and every other news- 
paper in the State that prints any harness horse 
news will be glad to publish the item. There are 
more horses in training in California at the present 
time than there have been for years. Forty trainers 
are working trotters and pacers at Pleasanton. A 
dozen trainers will be at work at San Jose within 
another week, some seven or eight being there now. 
Los Angeles track is stabling over 175 horses that are 
being trained for the harness events this year. Santa 
Rosa, Petaluma, Ukiah, Eureka, Sacramento, Fresno, 
Salinas, Hollister, Alameda, Bakersfield, Hanford, 
San Bernardino and many other places have from a 
dozen to fifty horses at work on their tracks. 



The North Pacific Circuit was a great success last 
year and the California horsemen want to go there 
again. They would rather race at home, however, 
during the early part of the season and strike the 
northern circuit at Salem, which opens the week 
after the California State Fair will close. Then, 
again, there are quite a number of Oregon and Wash- 
ington horsemen who would like to come to Califor- 
nia to train during April, May and June, and race at 
a few meetings here before returning home. So the 



chances for big- entry lists are good in California this 
year wherever there are good purses hung up and 
the dates are convenient. But dates must be an- 
nounced in February or there will be many places left 
out in the cold. 

Just why the district associations bang back until 
Mayor June to announce their meetings is one of 
those things hard to understand. If the Pleasanton 
association and the Breeders claim the two weeks 
just preceding the State Fair for their meetings, there 
will probably be objections raised by the Woodland 
and one or two other associations that have hereto- 
fore held those dates; but they will be compelled to 
take this course unless Woodland and the other 
places announce their intention of holding meetings. 
The horsemen who want to race in California this 
year will not start their horses in July, or the first 
week in August, and then be compelled to lay up three 
or four weeks without any racing until the State 
Fair. When the circuit starts there must be con- 
tinuous racing in California for several weeks, or the 
horses will be taken north or somewhere they can 
race continuously. It costs money to keep a string 
of horses in racing shape, and owners do not care to 
pay racing expenses for horses that are not racing. 
California should have a good circuit of eight or ten 
meetings every year, but such a circuit cannot be 
organized if associations persist in holding back their 
announcements until after other circuits are formed. 
It is to be hoped that by next week's issue of this 
journal that Petaluma, Napa, Woodland and 
others of the leading towns will know whether they 
will have a meeting or not and be able to announce 
the fact. If these announcements are not made, and 
the derelict associations find later, when they want 
dates, that they have already been taken, they will 
have only themselves to blame. 



Sired the Fastest Wilkes Trotter. 



Since the above was written the following has been 
received from Thos. Smith, manager of the Vallejo 
race track : 

Vallejo, Cal., Jan. 27, 1904. 
Editor Breeder and Sportsman— You can an- 
nounce that it is my intention to give three or feur 
days the second week in August, but I will not close 
them before April or May. Will give three $1000 
stakes and the balance from $300 to $500, or perhaps 
more if the entries will warrant it. Yours truly, 

Thomas Smith. 

The Grand Circuit Stewards Meet. 



The Stewards of the Crand Circuit were convened 
in executive session at the Hollenden Hotel, Cleve- 
land, Ohio, Wednesday, Jan. 20th at 11 o'clock. 
Among the tracks represented were Detroit, D. J. 
Campau; Cleveland, Geo. A. Dietrich; Buffalo, C. R. 
Bently; Empire City, James Butler: Brighton Beach, 
C. A. McCully; Readville, C. M. Jewett; Providence, 
A. H. Moone; Hartford and Cincinnati. A. J. Welch; 
Columbus, H. D. Shephard ; Memphis, Murray Howe, 
and Syracuse, A. E. Pcrrin. The first business con- 
sidered was the dates. This brought out a sharp 
contest and finally resulted in the followirg dates 
being selected : 

Detroit— July 18-23. 

Cleveland— July 25-30. 

Buffalo — August 1-6. 

Empire City — August 8-13. 

Brighton Beach — August 15-20. 

Readville— August 22-27. 

Providence — August 29-September 3. 

Hartford— September 5-10. 

Syracuse — Sept. 12-17. 

Columbus— Sept. 19-24. 

Cincinnati— Sept. 26-Oct. 1. 

Memphis— Oct. 17-27. 

1 he Cleveland Driving Club tendered the stewards 
and newspaper men a banquet at the Hollenden, 
where an elaborate luncheon was served. Toasts 
were responded to by H. K. Devereux, D. J. Campau, 
W. G. Pollock, Andy Welch, Judge Babcock and 
others. 

Steps were taken towards a closer and more per- 
manent organization of the members comprising the 
Grand Circuit, and a committee composed of the 
following gentlemen were appointed: D. J. Campau, 
H. K. Devereux, A. H. Moone, H. D. Shephard, C. 
A. McCully and C. M. Jewett. — American Sportsman. 



An Australian paper speaks of the once famous 
Yankee trotter Commodore trotting a race when he 
was 30 years old. The meeting was at Breakfast 
Creek, Queensland. Commodore was entered under 
the modest name of Jack. His appearance was not 
such as to encourage betting on him. His knees 
showed signs of frequent prayers and his haggard 
and broken appearance generally prompted a funny 
man in the crowd to admonish thestarter to get them 
off before Jack fell down. But Jack showed them 
something they had never seen before. He rattled 
his old bones and the sulky to the wire a long way 
ahead of the field. Commodore had a record in this 
country of 2:23. When sold to Australia he brought 
500 guineas. 



The tribe of Geo. Wilkes has been the great money 
winning branch of the Hambletonian family siEce it 
was founded by that great stallion whose gameness 
and endurance made him the most talked of horse in 
America. For years past the largest portion of the 
money hung up on the Grand Circuit and at the trot- 
ting tracks all over the United States has gone to 
horses that descended in the male line from the son 
of Hambletonian 10 and old Dolly Spanker. For a 
stallion to have the honor of siring the fastest trotter 
of all the Wilkes tribe is therefore quite a distinction 
and it belongs to Nutwood Wilkes 2:10$, owned by 
Mr. Martin Carter, proprietor of the Nutwood Stock 
Farm, Irvington, California. He is the sire of John 
A. McKerron 2:04J, a stallion that has reduced his 
record from year to year and is expected to yaftrot 
close to the two-minute mark, perhaps come within 
that time. 

Few stallions have ever stood for public service in 
California that sire a more uniform lot of colts than 
Nutwood Wilkes, and they not only bave a very 
high rate of speed at early colthood and improve with 
age, but they have that finish that denotes high 
breeding and stamps them as something above the 
ordinary. When booking mares to a 6tallion it is 
very important that this quality of finish be con- 
sidered. Horse breeding must be progressive to be 
successful. If there cannot be improvement in looks 
and style as well as speed, then the American trot- 
ting horse is not advancing as he should. But this 
improvement is very evident in many families that 
have descended from William Rysdyck's old horse 
and in none more than the family founded by Nut- 
wood Wilkes 2:16i. Good looks, size and style are all 
found in his get. Then they have the racing instinct— 
that desire to keep in the lead of other horses which 
is absolutely necessary to making a racing family. 
Their speed comes early.it is of the extreme kind 
and it breeds on through successive generations. 
Nutwood Wilkes has sired John A. McKerron 2:04J, 
Who Is It 2:10$, Claudius 2:13} and Bob Ingersoll 
2:14?, all trotters. 

C f the fast pacers sired by him are Stanton Wilkes 
2:10i, Georgie B. 2:12} and the three year old Tidal 
Wave 2:13}. He has twenty more in the list, the 
majority of them trotters. The daughters of Nut- 
wood Wilkes are destined to be great producers. 
There is no doubt of this. They seem to nick with 
all classes of stallions. Nutwood, the sire of Lid a W. 
dam of this horse, is by far the greatest broodmare 
sire yet produced. There are 214 of his daughters 
that have produced standard speed and the daughtets 
of Nutwood Wilkes seem to have the same power to 
reproduce. Very few of them have foals old enough 
to be trained. Not over a half dozen of these foals 
have over been started in a race, but among them aie 
Caroline L , a high-class trotting mare that took a 
record of 2:13} in the east last year; Iloilo, one of the 
handsomest trotting horses ever seen in California 
that earned a race record of 2:15 last season; Miss 
Georgie, a pacing mare that took a record of 2:25 as a 
three year old and was one of the fastest pacers out 
in 1903. She was second to Ben F. 2:10 in his best 
races, and was separately timed in a race in 2:09. 
Caroline L. is by Simmocolon, Iloilo by Welcome, and 
Miss Georgie by McKinney. Sam Hoy has a trotter 
by Demonio out of a Nutwood Wilkes mare that has 
shown a mile in 2:17. Nearest, a son of Nutwood 
Wilkes, is the sire of the fast mare Alone 2:09} that 
paced a half mile at Petaluma last season in 59} 
seconds. It will thus be seen that Nutwood Wilkes 
is not only a producer but his sons and daughters aie 
producers. The breeding on quality is inherent in 
the family. 

Although there has been an increasing demand for 
the services of Nutwood Wilkes during the past two 
year?, Mr. Carter has decided not to raise the service 
fee which will remain at $50 for the season. This for 
a horse that has sired the fastest trotter of the 
Wilkes tribe is, indeed, a low figure. 



North Pacific Circuit Dates. 



The North Pacific Fair Association met at Port- 
land last week and selected the following dates for 
its circuit of 1904: 

Seattle, August 22-27; Everett, August 29-Septem- 
ber 3; Whatcom, September 5-10; Salem, September 
12-17; Portland, September 19-24; North Yakima, 
September 25-October 1; Spokane, October 3-8; 
Walla Walla, October 10-15; Boise, October 17-22. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing 
year: President, W. H. Wehrung, Hillsboro, Oregon; 
Vice-President, A. J. Splawo, North Yakima, Wash.; 
Secretary, Robert Leighton, Vancouver, B. C; 
Treasurer, Dan Currie, Everett, Wash.; Board of 
Appeals, A. T. Van DeVanter, M. D. Wisdom, R. 
B. Caswell, Dan Currie, J. E. Shannon. 



Jaxuaby 30, 1901] 



Pleasanton Program. 

Secretary Fred Adams of the newly organized 
Pleasanton Racing Association announces the follow- 
ing program of the harness meeting to be given at 
Pleasanton and which will open the California circuit. 
The date of the meeting is not yet fixed, but will be 
before the first of March when the entries to the 
stakes will close. The Pleasanton and the Breeders 
associations are only waiting for a few of the other 
associations to announce that they will give meetings, 
and they will then be ready to fix dates that will be 
agreeable to all concerned. If other associations do 
not announce their intentions before the middle of 
February, they may find there will be no dates for 
them that will be convenient for bortemt n as a large 
number will probably go to Oregon immediately after 
the California State Fair. The Oregon State Fair 
will not open until after the Sacramen:o fair and 
horses campaigned in California will thus be enabled 
to race on both circuits, as there will be racing at 
Portland, North Yakima, Spckane, Walla Walla ar.d 
Boise City after the Oregon fair closes. The official 
advertisement of the Pleasanton program will be 
printed next week. The following are the classes and 
amounts provided for: 



KIRST DAY — WEDNESDAY. 

Citizens Stake. Pacing. 2;20 class. f 1000 

Trotting, 2:3) class, purse 500 

Local race, horses owned In Pleasanton and Murray town- 
ships, purse 100 

SECOND DAY — THURSDAY. 

Llvermore Valley Stake. Pacing, 2:13 class 1500 

Trotting. 2: l« class, purse 500 

Local race for horses owned In Washington and Eden town- 
ships 100 

THIRD DAY— FRIDAY. 

Pleasanton Stake. Trotting, three-year-olds ffloo 

Trotting, 2:14 class, purse. 600 

Race for horses owned In Contra Costa county, purse 100 

FOURTH DAY— SATURDAY. 

Pacing. 2:25 class, purse * 500 

Stake, trolling, 2:24 class 1000 

Pacing, 2:10 class, purse 800 



The officers of the Pleasanton Racing Association 
who will have charge of the arrangements for the 
meeting are as follows: 

President, C. L. Crellin; Vice-president, N. Hansen: 
Secretary, F. E. Adams; Treasurer, Bank of Pleasan- 
ton. Executive Committee, Geo. A. Davie, A. F. 
Schweer, A. S. Olney, Geo. A. Kelly, James Suther- 
land, C. L. Crellin, W. H. Donahue, F. E. Adams, 
Secretary. 

Stakes of Kansas City Jockey Club. 

In another column will be found the advertisement 
of the Kansas City Jockey Club. This, the first meet- 
ing of this new and enterprising club, surely deserves 
the support of all the horsemen, as it9 stake offerings 
aro most liberal, and as there will be no purse offered 
of less value tnan 9500 added, its daily average dis- 
tribution should be as large, if not greater, than any 
other club during the time of their meeting in the 
west. 

They offerthree stakes for two year olds, thelargest 
of which is $2000 added, the smallest $1200 added. 
For three year olds they offer the Kansas City Derby, 
one and one-quarter miles, with 35000 added, and the 
Missouri Handicap, one mile, with 81500 added. For 
three year old9 and upwards they offer five stakes, 
one of these being a steeplechase, called the Hunt 
and Polo Steeplechase. This has 81500 added. The 
Elm Ridge Handicap, one and one-eighth miles, has 
83500 added, and is one of the richest handicaps 
offered in the we9t; and the Country Club Handicap, 
one and three-sixteenths miles, has 82000 added, and 
this handicap to be run the latter part of themeoting. 

They also offer a 9take for sprinters, six furloDgs, 
called Star-Times Handicap, with 31200 added, and a 
Selling Stake, fifteen-sixteenths of a mile, called the 
Kansas City World Stakes, with 81200 added. 

Horsemen should notice that the entrance feo is 
very light, as in the majority of stakes it is only $5 to 
enter. This stake offering will compare with any 
stake offering in the west. 

The Kansas City Derby is conditioned so that it 
will not penalty the winner of a single Derby; a horse 
to get a penalty must win two derbies, yet non- winners 
of $2000 will have an allowance, giving them a chance 
to even defeat a Derby winner; As to the two year 
old stakes, there Is a stake for fillies and a stake for 
colts and geldings, the distance of each being four 
and one half furlongs, each of these baviDg 31200 
added, and the Swope Park Stakes for two year olds, 
with $2000 added, distance five furlongs. 

This meeting will open April 30th, and continue 
nineteen days, closing May 21st. The stakes will 
close March 1st. 



The Detroit News-Tribune says that the only way 
to stop the practice of laying up heats and to compel 
the drivers to drive r or each heat is to place the dis- 
tance flag about 25 yards from the finish, then get a 
cold-blooded, merciless individual, who hasn't a 
friend on earth and do9en't want one, to handle the 
flag.' 



Sacramento Driving Club Matinee. 

[Sacramento I'nlon, Jan. 2.S. ] 

There was a fine crowd at Agricultural Park Sunday 
afternoon to witness the harness events given at the 
initiatory matinee of the Sacramento Driving Club 
with owners as drivers Tho members of the club 
were glad of this manifestation of appreciation on the 
part of tho public. The members of the club say 
they are simply endeavoring to afford some clean 
sport for the people, and they are phased to know 
that they have not failed to arouse Interest In these 
events, which are free to the general public. 

In the first race (mile dash) Dr. McCollum's Jennie 
H. took first prize by a half length, with Albert 
Elk us' Rosa Gold second and C. W. Paine's Colonel 
third. This tss a pretfry exhibition and tha specta- 
tors responded with enthusiastic applause. Time, 
2: 6. 

J. L. Richards failed to show up with Mollie Nourse 
in time for the second race, and F. E. Wright sent his 
black mare Margaretta for an exhibition half in 1:03}, 
paced by a running mate. 

F. J. Ruhstaller, Jr., with his Hans clearly out- 
classed, Albert Eikus' Fritz, in the second race (mile 
dash), the official time being recorded at 2:54. Mr. 
Elkus asked for another trial, which was good natur- 
edly accorded, but the result was equally disastrous 
to Fritz. Time, 2:48. 

The fourth race (mile dash) brought out three nags, 
Bobby Dobbs, driven by J. Wheeler; Harry R., 
driven by Chae. Rust; Queen S., driven by Captain 
Charles Silva. Bobby Dobbs swerved toward the 
gate just after the start, and was so badly disap- 
pointed in not being allowed to leave the track that 
he went in the air, and came in third. Harry R. won, 
with Queen S. second. Time, 2:31 f. Mr. Rust was 
congratulated on his victory. 

Captain Silva's Duke Cameo was scratched in the 
fifth race, leaving F E. Wright's Royal Dame and 
John Norton's Light Bird to start. Royal Dame won. 
Time, 2:32. 

"Events like this are good for the town, '' said ex- 
Mayor Clark at the close of the races. "They ought 
to be encouraged by business men. There is no 
better sport for the people, as will be seen by the 
crowd here today. There is a bigger crowd than is 
often to be seen at State Fair races. These events 
ought to take place at least twice a month." 

Dr. Weldon said that the club's plans provide for 
such meetings every three weeks during the spring 
and summer. 

Judges (who also served as timers) were George H. 
Clark, William Lamport and Dr. E. J. Weldon. 
Walter Tryon served as Marshal. 

It was estimated that there were at least 2500 people 
in the grand stand and quarter stretch. The infield 
contained a great many carriages filled with in- 
terested spectators. 

Saddle Horse Paces Fast. 

The Kentucky Stork Farm is responsible for the 
following bit of news: In May, 1902, Walter H. 
Williams, of Detroit, Mich., bought from a firm at 
Versailles, Ky., a gelding named Judge Denny for a 
saddle horse. As a saddle horse he was one of tho 
showiest ever seen in Detroit's parks, beiDg able to 
walk, trot, fox-trot, running-walk, single-foot and 
canter: All that summer and fall his owner rode him, 
and about the middle of Septembor had him harness 
broken. Up to that time Judge Denny had never 
worn a harness, and it was after about a month that 
the trainer discovered that' he had any speed, and 
since then It has come to blm very fast. Last winter 
Mr. Williams drove him on the snow and he paced 
him along so smoothly that Mr. Williams decided to 
have him trained and worked through the summer. 
He was given slow work all summer, and not until 
late was he asked to show what he could do. One 
day in October, when the Grosse Polnte track was 
muddy and in bad condition, Judge Denny paced a 
mile In 2:12}, the last half In 1:03, and the last quarter 
in 20} seconds, causing the watch holders to open 
their eyes In wonder. Judge Denny went into winter 
quarters In perfect condition, and tho trainer, Sam 
Kerr, thinks he will be good enough for any of tho 
stake engagements next season. He Is a big, power- 
ful fellow, has lots of endurance, and the mile never 
seems too long for him, as his best flight of speed is 
at the end. Judgo Denny Is very well bred, being by 
Time Medium 2:20} (son of Happy Medium), out of 
Nottie Vance by Sherman's Ilambletonian. He Is 
seven years old. 

Among tho best record horses that died during 1903 
were: Arch W. 2:11}; Beuzetta 2:0fij; Blonda Red- 
wood 2:08}; Birch wood 2:15; Bell Bird 2:22; Courier 
2-15; Edna Cook 2:12; Hal Pointer 2:04<; King Charles 
2-0H}; Lou Vaughn 2:091; Pixley2:08}: Hllma 2:09}; 
Seneca See 2:11}; Tho Merchant, 2:13}; The Swift 
2:09}, and Vendor 2:11}. 



Proposed Change in the Rules. 

Some forty changes in the rules of the National 
Trotting Association will be submitted to thecongress 
of members, that is to meet In New York February 
10th. Some of these changes proposeel aro not ma- 
terial, others are Important. Besides these It is pro- 
posed to strike out Rule 7, Sec. 1; Rule 20, Sec. 2; 
Rule 21, Sec. 1; Rule 22, Sec. 1, and Rule 68. The 
rules struck out are rendered obsolete or useless by 
proposed amendments to other rules. An Important 
amendment Is in Rule 7, Sec. 1, regulating the entry 
of horses to race meetings as follows: 

The entry shall give the name and address of the 
owner, and If signvd by an agi-nt, the name and ad- 
dress of said agent, also, the name and color of the 
horse, whether a stallion, gelding or mare the name 
of the sire and the name of the dam, If known; If un- 
known, It shall be so stated In the entry. If any of 
these requirements aro not complied with, the offend- 
ing party shall be fined not less than $5 or more than 
$50 for each offense, and if the facts are falsely stated 
for the purpose of deception, the guilty party shall 
be fined, suspended or expelled. 

This rule will require drivers and owners enterirg 
horses to study pedigrees, and will make entries by 
wire rather expensive. 

The change proposed in Rule 5, Sec. 2, is as follows: 

A horse shall not be eligible if the time specified 
has bnen obtained by him at a greater distance; that 
Is, a horse having maae two miles In five minutes shall 
take a record of 2:30 and be eligible for a 2:30 race, 
but not for a race limited to horses of a slower class 
than that. 

Rule 11, Sec. 7, has been changed materially. The 
proposed amendment is as follows: 

All engagements, including obligations for entrance 
fees, shall be void upon the decease of either party or 
horse, prior to the starting of the race, so far as they 
shall affect the deceased party or horse; except where 
the proprietorship Is in more than one person, and 
any survive, the survivor and horse shall be held; 
but forfeits, also matches made "play or pay," sbaM 
not be affected by the death of the horse. 

It is proposed to add a new section to Rule 15, 
which is quite strenuous. It is also an all-embracing . 
rule, a 9ort of drag-net-rule. It reads thus: 

If any person be guilty of, or shall conspire with 
any other person for the commission of, or shall con- 
nive at any other person being guilty of any corrupt 
or fraudulent practice in relation to racing in this or 
any other country ; or who shall have administered a 
drug or stimulant internally or by hypodermic 
method prior to or during the progress of a race, or 
who shall have used appliances electrical or mechani- 
cal other than the ordinary whip and spur shall be 
fined, suspended or expelled according to the gravity 
of the offense. 

Rule 28 will be improved with a new section to 
which the alert attention of all race drivers is here- 
with called. It read;i as follows: 

After each heat the drivers or riders shall c me to 
the judges' stand and not dismount or leave their 
vehicles without permission of the judges, and no 
d river or rider shall be changed after starting except 
by order of the judges. 

This rule is not very important so far as changing 
drivers is concerned, as the judges would hardly ea- 
danger the chances of a horse winning a heat by an 
attempt to change drivers after starting, which 
means, of course, after the starting judge gives the 
word "go." 

Beforo the rulo is finally adopted by the congress it 
should be made more specific 

There is an important change proposed in Rule 35, 
Section 2, that is vital, as follows: 

The judges shall not declare the deciding beat of a 
race void, unless the winning horse was guilty of im- 
proper conduct in that heat, or h ! s winning was the 
result of collusion or other fraudulent conduct on the 
part of other contestants in the race. 

A very important rule is proposed, to be known as 
Section 3, Rule 59, the violation of which involves 
expulsion with no provision for milder treatment by 
the judges. It reads as follows: 

No horse sold or bargained for, conditionally or 
otherwise, after 7 p. M. of the day preceding an en- 
gagement Is eligible tocompete. Any person violating 
this rule shall be expelled. 

None of the other amondments and changes pro- 
posed are Important. Raco horsemen and drivers 
snould study these proposod amendments carefully 
and if they disapprove of any of the changes forward 
your opinion to Secretary Wm. II. Gochor, Hartford, 
Conn. He will submit your views to the Rule Com- 
mittee of the Twenty-second Congress. The Rule 
Committee will meet in New York, February 8th — 
American Sportsman. 

The Kennoy Manufacturing Company, 531 Valencia 
street, San Francisco, has a second-hand Toomey 
cart with wood wheels, extra heavy carrlago tie, 
cushion, etc., that Is as good as now, having been 
used but little, which will be sold for $90, regular 
price $135. Harness, blankets, etc., goes with it. 
They also havo a fine surrey for sale cheap and manu- 
facture sulky wheels and attachments to order. 
Pneumatic tires, solid cushions put on all kinds of 
vehicles. * 



For all kinds of weather there Is no drink like 
Jackson's Napa Soda — plain or In a lemonade. 



[January 30, 1W4 



Notes and News, m 

Pleasanton's program is out. 




Vallejo claims second week in August. 



What association will make the next announcement. 



Kinney Lou 2:07ij will be shipped from Alameda to 
San Jose on Monday next. 



Fred E. Ward, of Los Angeles, has a good green 
trotting mare by James Madison for sale. See ad- 
vertisement. 

The California pacer, Clipper 2:06, is said to be 
king of the snow path in Chicago. He is owned by 
Morris Vehon. 

Trilby Direct 2:08], will be raced over half-mile 
tracks this year by Tom Murphy, one of James But- 
ler's ti ainers. 

Budd Doble and Homer Saxe have sold the Diablo 
colt Diogenes, and he has been shipped to Mexico 
where he will be placed in the stud. 



Citizens of Syracuse will guarantee a $10,000 early 
closing stake for trotting horses to be made the 
feature of the Grand Circuit meeting there. 



A fine surrey, one of the best made, and handsomely 
finished is for sale at about half its value by the 
Kenney Manufacturing Company, 531 Valencia street, 
San Francisco. # 

The special edition issued by the North Pacific 
Rural Spirit during the session of the National Live 
Stock Convention at Portland, was a splendid paper 
tilled with many interesting and instructive articles. 



The Green Meadow Farm at Santa Clara is offered 
for sale. This is one of the most beautiful and 
thoroughly equipped stock farms in California and 
the price asked font is very reasonable. See adver- 
tisement. 

Stam B. 2:11*, had a larger season in 1903 than he 
did in 1902. The breeders of California are just be- 
ginning to realize that he is one of the highest class 
horses in America, and he will have a heavy season 
this year. 

Lecco 2:09j, the handsome stallion owned by Ed 
Mills of Pleasanton, has the distinction of being a son 
of the only mare that has ever produced two 2:10 
trotters. That's the sort to breed to. It can't help 
but pay with ordinary luck. 



Blackbird, a mare owned by Grant Stringer, of 
Bouckville, New York, is known to be 38 years old. 
She raised a colt in 1903 and is certainly with foal 
again. It is safe to say there is no parallel case to 
this in the annals of horse breeding. 



Thos. Smith, lessee of the Vallejo track, will give a 
harness meeting during the second week in August. 
Three stakes of $1000 each will be hung up. The 
circuit is beginning to assume shape, and four meet- 
ings are certain: Pleasanton, Breeders, Vallejo and 
the State Fair. 

Henry Dunlap of Pleasanton came down to the city 
this week and purchased from the Kenney Manu- 
facturing Company one of those handsome McMurray 
sulkies finished in white enamel and trimmed in gilt. 
It is a beauty and Mr. Dunlap says it is one of the 
best running sulkies he ever sat in. 



The wideawake horse owners of Pleasanton are 
Btrongly agitating the formation of a gentlemen's 
driving club. The Pleasanton Racing Association 
has already been organized and will give one or more 
regular meetings eaih year. A gentlemen's driving 
club would be a powerful adjunct to the sport at the 
horse centre and its matinees would draw big crowds. 



There will be a hundred horses in training at San 
Jose before the first of March. The strings of trainers 
C. A. Durfee, J.W.Gordon, W. H.Williams, John 
Phippen, T. W. Barstow and others are already there, 
and Joe Cuicello, Hans Frellson, J. W. Zibble will 
move to the track in a few weeks. The San Jose 
track is one of the bast training tracks in California. 



W. L. Sp°ars recently sold his half interest in the 
trotting stallion Jay McGregor 2:08 to bis partner, 
J. L McLain, for $12,500. McLain paid $7,500 for the 
other half interest, and so now.ownes the fast son of 
Jay Hawker at an outlay of $20,000 He intends to 
keep Jay McGregor in the Jstud for a season before 
turning him over to Scott Hudson, who will again 
take him down the Grand Circuit. 



Mr. Paul R. Isenberg, of the Wailae Ranch, 
Hawaiian Territory, now owns the pacing mare Ruby 
M. 2:12* by Almont Patchen. Ruby M. is due to foal 
in a few days to a grandson of old Marin 19940, sire 
of the gray whirlwind trotter Marin Jr. 2:13, that 
Pat Farrel developed and rated so successfully on 
the California circuit nine or ten years ago. " Mr. 
Isenberg is also the owner of a handsome young Ptal- 
lion coming three years old that is by Boodle 2:121, 
dam by Sable Wilkes, second dam by Haopy Medium. 
This young stallion and several others belongine r to 
Mr. Isenberg are being developed at Honolulu by Will 
Morris. 



" It is (-aid that dash racing may be given a thorough 
trial at next summer's Grand Circuit meeting at 
Brighton Beach. 

Tom James left for his old home in Des Moines. 
Iowa, last week, taking his stall'on Barondale 2.14} 
with him. We believe every mare Barondale was 
bred to last year is reported in foal. 



If Woodland willclaimits usual date which is the 
week before the California State Fair, the Breeders 
will take the week before Woodland, and Pleasanton 
the week before Vallejo, thus opening the circuit the 
first week in August, and insuring six weeks of good 
racing. 

Searchlight 2:03} never looked better than he does 
this spring. His percentage of foals from the mares 
served last year will be very large. As he had a large 
number of high class mares, the foals of this year will 
doubtle36 be winning stakes in their two and three 
year old form, adding a value to the foals f-f next 
year. Those who send their mares to him this season 
will be wise. 

Robert Leighton, secretary of the North Pacific 
Racing Circuit, and who was presiding judge and 
starter at several of the meetings held in Washing- 
ton and Oregon last season, has been offered and has 
accepted the position of general manager and clerk of 
the course for race meetings of the California Polo 
Pony Racing Association, which will hold its first 
meeting at Del Monte, February 18th to 22d, inclu 
sive. 

New York will have its annual parade of light-har- 
ness horses thU year, the Road Drivers Association 
again having decided to promote the event that has 
always aroused so much intorest among followers of 
the trotter. The date will be May 7, when the asso- 
ciation expects to have an affair of even greater im- 
portance than the parades of the past. Last year the 
plan was abandoned for speedway brushing, but this 
spring there will be brushing in addition to the par- 
ade. 

Millard Sanders, trainer and driver of Lou Dillon, 
the queen of the turf, has written to Superintendent 
Frank A. Turner, of the Santa Rosa Stock Farm, 
where the great mare was bred, regarding the coming 
season with that animal. Sanders complains of the 
cold weather in which he is spending the winter. 
Heretofore he has wintered in California. He de- 
clares his belief that with perfect handling Lou Dillon 
can step a mile in 1:54 or 1:66 and this is the only 
thing that could possibly cause him to remain in the 
Eastern climate for the rest of the winter. 



Gentry Stock Farm, Bloomington, Ind., has issued 
a neat catalogue, and we are under obligations to the 
ownei for a copy. Mr. Gentry has already received 
in service fees nearly the entire sum of the $25,000 
he paid for McKinney and has been offered $40 000 
for him, which offer was declined. The Gentry farm 
contains 400 acres of choice blue grass land, "the kind 
that made Kentucky famous, " and a band of very 
choice broodmares, several of them California bred, 
has been collected. McKinney is to be limited to 35 
outside mares this year at $200 and next year will be 
a private stallion. 

It is announced that C. K. G. Billings has expressed 
a determination to procure, if possible, the identical 
sulky that Maud S. pulled when she lowered the 
world's champion trotting record to 2:08ij, and let the 
public know how fast a mile Lou Dillon 1:58$ can trot 
hitched to that vehicle. It is to be hoped that the 
sulky will be loaned and that it will be in as good con- 
dition as on the day Maud S. pulled it in 2:08j and 
that if the California mare pulls it in 2:00 there will 
be no protest made on the ground that her driver 
wore a necktie of a lighter color than the one worn 
by W. W. Bair at Cleveland, July 30, 1885. 



The following telegram from Salem, Oregon, was 
printed in the Ch ron icle of this city last Wednesday: 
"Charged with stealing Diablo, a pacing stallion 
valued at $5000, C. D. Crook ham, a prominent San 
Francisco horseman, was arrested in this city to-day. 
Diablo is held under lease by Sam Casto, a well-known 
Oregon horseman. The owner of the pacer is Mrs. 
William Murray of Woodland Crook ham arrived 
in Salem to-day and demanded possession of the 
horse. This was refused, whereupon he repaired to 
the State Fair grounds, broke open the stable and 
took the animal. Casto promptly caused his arrest. 
He was released on his own recognizance and will be 
given a hearing to-day. Both sides have employed 
tbe best of legal talent and a battle royal is expected. 
The whole question apparently binges upon the 
right of Casto to hold the horse under his lease. A 
large number of owners of brood mares who have con- 
tracts on Diablo's services are greatly interested in 
the outcome." 

In an interview in Chicago C. W. Marks, speaking 
for Mr. Billings, says: "As long as there is any 
question over the validity of the record made by Lou 
Dillon to a high-wheeled sulky, braaking the record 
made by Maud S., Mr. Billings does not want the 
record I have heard Mr. Billings talk many times 
of record-smashing, and I know his sentiments, and I 
think T know the man well enough to say that, if 
there is any question of a record held by his mare, he 
is willing to try over Bgain and get the record only 
through the most perfect condition." This is cor- 
rect. With the same sulky that Maud S was har- 
nessed to and under the same conditions, every horse- 
man in the country who has seen Lou Dillon step 
knows that she can beat 2:08} at least three seconds, 
but according to the peculiar decision Lou Dillon 
must draw this same sulky in 1 :58} or better or it is 
not a record. She must beat her own best record or 
she can not get a mark. The absurdity of the ruling 
is beccotning more ridiculous every day. 



Mr. A. C. Dietz has re-purchased the pacer Alfred 
D. 2:12} by his good stallion Longworth 2:19 son of 
Sidney. Mr Dietz bred and raised Alfred D. and sold 
him for $150 as a two year-old. His record was made 
as a three-year old. Alfred D. 'sdam is Ferndale Belle 
by Judge Salisbury, he by Nutwood; second dam 
Satinella by Winthrop, third dam Fanny Norris, a 
thoroughbred mare from Kentucky, said to be by 
Printer. In her day she was the fastest mare in the 
State for a half mile. Alfred D. is 16 J hands high, 
bright bay, and of such a disposition that a child can 
drive him. The former owner says he can drive him 
in two minutes. Alfred D. is undoubtedly one of the 
grandest looking horses in California or the United 
States. 

On the front page of the Breeder and Sports- 
man this week is an engraving from a picture taken 
recently of the stallion Director 2:17, founder of a 
great family. Director is now 27 years old, but is 
strong and vigorous and will doubtless live for several 
years yet and be a useful horse in tbe stud. He is 
owned by the Locust Grove Stock Farm, at New 
Castle, Pennsylvania. He is now tbe fire of 58 
standard performers including Directum 2:05}, Direct 
2:05*, Nathan Straus 2:05}. Direction 2:08* and twenty 
more with records below 2:20. Over 30 of his sons 
have sired fast performers, and fifty standard trot- 
ters and pacers have been produced by his daughters. 
In his great campaign on the Grand Circuit in 1883, 
he won ten races including one purse of $10,000, two 
of $5000 each, one of $3000 and one of $2500. 



Mr. Ed. Mills, who recently purchased of the Oak- 
wood Park Stock Farm the five-year-old chestnut 
mare Derbertha, bas since sold her to Mr. Robert 
Niles, at present a resident of Pleasanton but formerly 
of Humboldt Co., for the sum of $1500 This mare is 
a grand individual as well as a great bred one being 
by the great sire Cbas. Derby 2:20, dam the wonder- 
ful broodmare Bertha by Alcantara 2:23, the greatest 
eon of George wilkes. She is, therefore, full sister to 
the great race horse and sire Diablo 2:09}, Don Derby 



uy aieiuway anu uwyuu yp) uy uwynee. 

Derbertha is a beautifully gaited pacer and as a three 
year-old worked a mile over the Oak wood Farm track 
in 2:10*. She has had no work but will now be 
trained at Pleasanton by the former Humboldt Co. 
trainer, Matt Zahner. Mr. Niles is to be congratulated 
on securing this grand young mare for what seems to 
be such a low price for one of her kind. 

Budd Doble, who will take his siallion Kinney Lou 
2:07} to San Jose on the 1st of February, will begin 
giving him slow work and not move him up very fast 
until after tbeclose of his season, May 1st. Mr. Doble 
brought with him from the East last fall a sulky new 
to this Coast, called the Decker. It is a very band- 
some vehicle, and Doble claims bas many advantages 
over other sulkies. The horse can be hitched closer 
than in any other sulky by reason of the bars or 
rather curved axles, of which there are three instead 
of the usual two, all being plaoed flat against the 
lower side of the sulky seat, so there is no extension 
below the seat. By thii plan a gain of three or four 
inches is made in the space under the seat, and conse- 
quently the seat can be that much lower — a great ad- 
vantage. The tubings are all filled with wood which 
prevents the steel from crystalizing or breaking 
through jarring. In both shafts half tubes are set in 
the wood, which makes them lighter and at the same 
more rigid. 

A newcomer- to the list of fast trotters during 1903, 
was the mare Caroline L. 2:13}, whose dam is a 
daughter of the California stallion Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16*. Caroline L. was bred at the Ypsilanti Stock 
Farm in Michigan and is by Simmocolon. Her dam 
is the mare Edna Nutwood by Nutwood Wilkes, sec- 
ond dam Sedina 2:28* by Sidney, third dam Star, 
(dam of Hailstorm 2:30) by Geo. M. Patchen Jr. 31, 
fourth dam Lady Primusby PrimuB, fifth dam Fanny 
McCourtnie. Nutwood Wilkes is rapidly coming to 
the front as a sire of producing mares. Two of bis 
daughters have produced Caroline L. 2:13} and Uoilo 
2:15, both trotters, while another daughter is thedam 
of the pacer Miss Georgie 2:25, that was second to Ben 
F. 2:10 in his races last year and was timed separately 
in 2:09 in a race. His son Nearest 2:22 is the sire of 
the champion four-year-old pacing mare of 1902, Alone 
2:09*. Aa item worthy of note in the pedigree of 
Caroline L. is that her third dam is an own sister to 
the second dam of the champion four-year-old trotter 
of 1903, the bay gelding Judge Green 2:10} by 
Directum. 

Judge Dougherty of Santa Rosa has sent to Ed 
Mills to be traineu his very promising young trotting 
mare Sonoma Girl by Linwood Wilkes 2:20*, dam 
Maud Fowler 2:21*. by Anteeo2:16}; second dam the 
great broodmare Evelyn, dam of Roblet 2:12. Tie 
tain 2:19 and others, by the great Nutwood 2:183. 
This mare is very fast, good gaited and good beaded, 
has been handled and developed by Dick Abies at 
Santa Rosa, and is considered by him as one of the 
greatest prospects be bas ever bandied. It will be 
seen that she is one of the best bred ones in America. 
Her sire, Linwood Wilkes, was raced by the late John 
Goldsmith as a two-year-old and obtained his record 
of 2:20* that year. Mr. Goldsmith regarded him as 
the greatest trotter ever 6ired by the great Guy 
Wilkes 2:15}, and offered Mr. Wm. Corbett, his 
breeder and owner at that time, a very large price 
for him, which was promptly refused. He unfortu- 
nately met with an accident which prevented his 
further development and cut his racirg career short. 
His dam was by Sultan Jr 12771, son of finltan. 
Sonoma Girl's dam is a daughter of Anteeo 2:16}. one 
of Electioneer^ best sons, next dam a great brood- 
mare by Nutwood, so as will be seen she carries tbe 
blood of three of the greatest trotting families, com- 
ing through the best representatives of each family. 



January 30, 1904 j 



©he a3vcci>er ant} Opovteman 



1 



The Trotter's Wind Shield. 

The advent of the two-minute trotter and the fastt r 
pacer was received during the past season with muih 
jubilation by horsemen all over the land. Many an 
old-timer'* prediction was fulfilled, and many there 
were who acknowledged the error of their judgment 
as to the impossibility of the feat, but a calmer con- 
sideration of these sensational records has resulted in 
discrediting or throwing out the same by harness 
horse authorities, and the decision thus rendered has 
started a bitter controversy on all sides among horse- 
men. Let us throw aside all sentiment in the matter 
and attempt a mathematical solution of the problem 
as to the benefit rendered a performing horse by the 
wind or dirt shield pacemaker. 

On a perfectly still day a horse going around two 
minutes is breasting a wind of 30 mile* an hour 
created by his motion. Overcome this force which 
is opposing his speed, either completely or even 
partially, and you will materially accelerate his 
motion by preventing a distressing waste of energy 
to the performer. We will now find what the 
pressure of the air amounts to when no shield is em- 
ployed. For several centuries machines have been 
invented to determine the pressure of wind of various 
velocities. The sails of a vessel under a breeze of 30 
miles an hour stand a pressure of over six pounds per 
square foot. Windmill experiments show 4} pounds 
pressure per square foot for a 30-mile an hour wind, 
while perhaps the most reliable instrument, the an- 
emometer of Dr. Lind, gives 5 pounds per square foot 
for a 30-mile wind. This we will abide by as a con- 
servative figure. The United States Weather Bureau 
uses Smeaton's rule, which gives 4} pounds pressure 
per square foot on a flat surface. Observations in 
England showed 14 pounds per square foot for a 38- 
mile wind and 42 pounds pressure for a 70-mile wind, 
or about twice as great a9 Smeaton's rule would give. 

Now the surface presented by a harness horse when 
rushing through the atmosphere, is made up by the 
front part of the horse, his legs, part of the driver, 
part of the sulky, and the fore part of the wheels, all 
of which, measured on a present time champion, 
amount to about twelve square feet; however, the 
surfaces whose section is twelve square feet, are not 
flat, but rather spherical or cylindrical; hence the 
pressure on such surfaces is different from that on 
flat surfaces, or is equal to one-half, according to 
Troutwlneand other experimenters. Thus the two- 
minute horse op a dead calm day, facing a thirty-mile 
wind created by himself, meets an opposing force of 
one-half of five pounds per square foot, or two and 
one-half pounds; and the section of the cylindrical 
surfaces in this case being twelve square feet, we find 
by multiplying twelve by two and a half, a pressure 
of thirty pounds against the unshielded trotter. 

Behind the shield, the horse benefits most when 
cloae up, but benefits some if within any reasonable 
distance. The partial vacuum and suction, so called, 
behind the pacemaker certainly withdraw a large 
part of the thirty pounds pressure that would other- 
wise oppose the horse. The dirt shield pacemaker 
shields the horse behind in the same way that the 
Reliance in the windward position effectually 
blanketed the Shamrock, though the two were more 
than twenty lengths apart, and yet some horsemen 
claim that only when the pace follower is less than 
one length behind is he assisted to any extent. 

When the champions of the past year go their 
miles unshielded this coming season we will better 
appreciate the damaging effect of atmospheric press- 
ure on their wonderful records. — H'k/Ii E. McLnuyhlin 
in Xew York Sun. 

Cup Awards at Denver. 

Historian J. R. Stevens presented his report to the 
Denver Gentlemen's Driving and Riding Club at the 
meeting held January 2d. The club held twenty-seven 
matinees in 1903, in which ninety-one trotters and 
pacers competed, and thirty-Eeven heavy harness 
horses competed for ribbons. 

June24th the state track record for road wagon was 
lowered to 2:12J by Martha B., owned and driven by 
J.W.Miller. August 1 st the mile racing City Park 
track record was lowered to 2:14} by Miss Williams, 
owned and driven by George E. Ady. August 29th 
the pole team track half-mile record was lowered to 
1 :07 J by Daisy Field and Primrose, owned and driven 
by J. Fred Roberts. October 10th the pacing track 
record, half-mile, was lowered to 1:03J by Primrose, 
owned and driven by J. Fred Roborts. October 21th 
the trotting track record, half-mile, was lowered to 
l:06JbyJim Ferry, owned by Wright & Stoddard, 
driven by E. J. Stoddard. 

The following are the five highest making entries 
in light harness events: J. Fred Roberts, 2!) races; 
George E. Ady, 20; George M. Black, 18; J. K. Stuart, 
17; Ed Matthews, 15. 

The following are the five highest winners in light 



harness events: Daisy Field, 13 races; Primrose, 7; 
Little Fellow, 6; Little Ruby.C; Daniel J., 5. Cup is 
awarded for most races in light harness events to J 
Fred Roberts, account Daisy Field. 

Daisy Field and 1 rimrose being a tie for fastest beat 
in a race, both having won the heat in 1 :04, the cupls 
awarded to J. Fred Roberts, account of them jointly. 

Heretofore not more than one cup has been won in 
one season by any member and Mr. Roberts was 
heartily congratulated upon breaking the prize-win- 
ning record. 

One cup was awarded Mr. Roborts lor the fastest 
heat, one for the most entries In races and the third 
for winning the most races. A cup was awarded to 
D. Hogan for winning the most events in the saddle 
horse class and one to N. Fitzell for making the most 
entries in saddle horse classes. 

The officers for ISM are: J.A.Burnett, President: 
C. H. Reynolds, Vice-President; J. K. Stuart, Secre- 
taay and Treasurer: E. D. Davis, Historian. Board 
of Directors — J. Fred Roberts, J. A Osner, M. J. 
Dunleavy. A. S. Donaldson, H. Randolph Guggen- 
heimer and F. C. Came. All the officers wero elected 
unanimously. 

A Good Story of "Uncle" George Fuller. 

"Uncle" George Fuller, known from one end of the 
United States to the other and in "furrin parts" as 
well, 's dead. He had been practically confined to his 
room for many weeks prior to his demise, which 
occurred at Hermitage, Tenn., on January 7th. Few 
men had more individuality than George Fuller, and 
there was never a season, during his long career on 
the harness turf, that he did not do something to add 
to the history of harness racing. He grew up in the 
"old" school, which developed the "generals" who 
made the killings. About ten years, or less, ago he 
was racing something along "for educational pur- 
poses" and got into a race in Ohio, which the judges 
thought he could win, if he tried. They called him 
into the stand in the course of the race to give him a 
lecture. As he climbed into the sacred enclosure the 
chief judge said to him: "Mr. Fuller, the people over 
there (waving his hand in the direction of the grand- 
stand) do not think you are trying to win this race." 
Quick as a flash Fuller retorted: "Gentlemen, I don't 
care a cuss what the people over there thin k . 1 want 
to know what you think. " The kinks were all taken 
out of the men in authority; they gave Uncle George 
a mild reproof and that ended the incident. The 
editor of the Kentucky Stock Farm is in better position 
to recount the good ones Fuller developed and raced, 
and a list of them would prove highly interesting. 
The writer, joining with a host of friends, wishes the 
veteran reinsman peace and happiness beyond the 
grave, and regre'.sthat hecould not have been spared 
to enjoy his old age in quiet in his Tennessee home. — 

KintuHty stork- Farm. 

Some Pertinent Suggestions. 

R. I. Lee, former owner of Robert McGregor, has 
some very pertinent suggestions to offer for the bene- 
fit of our turf law makers: He says: 

"The fairest method of betting on harness races is 
through the French mutual system. Here the bettors 
themselves make the odds. Let the associations own 
and operate the mutual machines, and have a suffi- 
cient nupiber to accommodate largeand small bettors 
The French mutual system can just as well be applied 
to the result of the race as to the result of a heat, 
and i would have machines operated both ways, 
which would give all manner.of bettors an opportun- 
ity of laying their money as they thought best. At 
all Western meetings may be found scores of men who 
care to bet only a small amount at one time, and pre- 
fer playing heats to results of races. These men fre- 
quently care to bet no moro than 82, and, if afforded 
an opportunity of betting by the bookmakers, find 
themselves squarely against a one-sided game, ar.d 
have but little chance of winning. Frequenters of 
race meetings will wager more or loss money. It is 
practically impossible to conduct a harness met ting 
without some form of betting. This being an assured 
fact, why not give bettors some show in the game/. 

"I have also advocated for many years tnat no 
moro horses should be started in a race than can 
score in one tier, selecting the first two or three 
horses in the finish of the first heats for the finals, as 
they do in athletic contests. For instance, supr osirg 
that fifteen horses answered the call for a 2:30 trot. 
Divide this number into three fieldp, and after each 
field had trotted one heat let the horses finishing 
first in the trial heats trot another mile for the first, 
second and third moneys. This method would make 
each race of the kind referred to a four-heat event, 
bui only three horses would bo compelled to trot 
more than one mile. By this method trotters and 
pacora could oasily go two or three races in a week. 
In order to still further make it possible to race a 



horse more than once a week, I would have all entries 
to purse races close the night before the race, with a 
straight 5 per cent entrance fee, and nothing addi- 
tional from money winners. This would enable a 
man to start a horse two or three times a week and 
avoid getting him in company each time that was too 
fast for him. With an over-night entrance owners 
should be compelled to pay the 5 per cent fee when 
they made the entry, and this would do away with so 
many suspensions for non-pay ment of entrance money 
and place associations in shape to race off their pro- 
grams. 

"Aoothor matter that I have had under consldera. 
tion for many years Is a supreme court for all cases 
coming before tho board of appeals, wherein parties 
feeling themselves aggrieved at the decisions of the 
turf courts may have an opportunity of carryirg the 
matter to a higher tribunal. This supreme couit 
could try appeals from both associations, and sboull 
be supported by the American and Vatlonal Trotllrg 
Associations. I understand that quite large silking 
funds are being held in trust (for whom It is not 
known) by each association, and the cost of a supreme 
court would not cause a deficit in the treasury of 
either. Let some such eminent jurist as General 
Tracy bo named as one of the judges of this court, 
and with such a choice place other men equally well 
versed in the law and matters pertaining to harness 
racing, pay the judges a salary that would enable 
them to devote six months of tho year to the business 
referred to, and let the court hold annual sessions at 
various points throughout the United States, thus 
making it convonien'. for those having cases before 
the court to attend." 

Emperor William's Saddle Horse. 

Following up his delicate and diplomatic compli- 
ment to Yankee yacht builders in ordering the Meteor 
here, Emperor William of Germany has paid a grace- 
ful tribute to American saddle horse breeders by 
placing an order for the finest animal of this type 
obtainable in the United States. 

Th rough Lord Lonsdale of England, who is a per- 
sonal friend of the Kaiser and also of W. D. Grand, 
the latter has been commissioned carte blanche to 
purchase a horse good enough for tho Emperor to 
ride at the bead of the German army. 

Appreciating the responsibility, as well as the con- 
fidence reposed in him, Mr. Grand is determined to 
send the Kaiser an ideal saddle horse or none at all. 
And he does not hesitate to say heis somewhat doubt- 
ful about obtaining one that can meet all the require- 
ments demanded. 

The animal must be of the color and somewhat of 
the stamp of Napoleon's famous white horse, as de. 
picted by Meis6onier, De Neuvilleand Detaille, and he 
must be not under 1">.1 hand* and not exceed 15.2 
hands in height, with conformation, quality aLd man- 
ners as nearly perfect as possible. 

Mi. Grand hopes to obtain a Kentucky saddle horse 
that will fill the bill. They are conceded to be the 
finest riding horses in the world . One difficul y is in 
the way, however. Very few of them are white or 
gray, the prevailing colors being bay, brown and 
chestnut. In speaking of the type of horse required, 
Mr. Grand said that a crossbred Kentucicy-Aiabian 
animal might be of the right stamp. Nearly all 
Arabians seen in this country are gray or white and 
very bloodlike and beautiful. It is Mr. Grand s idea 
that Arabians crossed with tho Kentucky siddle 
bred horse would approach perfection for tie pur- 
poses of an Emperor's charger. — Chicmjn Horseman. 



Combault's 

Caustic 
Balsam 




for ailments of 

HORSES and CATTLE. 



A. * III MAN ai HI.KT l-r Khrii- 
n. .i ..... Hpriilna, Hiiri- Thrtuit. "l . It 

la Invaluatdp. 

> ... ' « ..,.«!. It in told I. 

Warranted loglx aailafactlon. hi.< ttl.M 
per hottlr. Bold l»y dmirirl.ta, or p«»nr by r i- 
nrran. "-hanfe. i ». I with full dlnvtl'm* for Ha 
u.e. Send for llaWI |Q-II I i circular*, lenllmo- 
nlala.atr. A.ldrr.. 

TBI LI TKIICI-WILLUIS C0IP.IT, CltMlasd, Ohio. 



8 



[January 30, 1W04 





ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. Ue WITT. 



San Francisco Kennel Club. 



W. K. C. Show. 



The club me mbers and officials are actively engaged 
in the preliminary work for the \pril show in this 
city. Indications point to a large entry ; the fact that 
premium lists and entry blanks are already in demand 
by a number of fanciers who will make their initial 
eutry is an encouraging sign. The list and blanks 
will be issued early and forwarded to every possible 
add ress obtainable; individual requests for the same 
will be answered promptly. 

The office work will be conducted by experienced 
attaches and in a manner that will be satisfactory to 
all concerned. 

Rumor has it that Mr. James Mortimer will be in- 
vited to judge. Mr. Mortimer was herein 1896 and 
1900. he will also be remembered by veteran fanciers 
as the judge of several earlier shows. Mr. Mortimer's 
engagements have always been satisfactory here. He 
has been identified in doggy affairs for a quarter of a 
century and is recogni/ed as one of the best posted 
bench show officials and all round judges in the United 
Slates. He is a writer of authority as well. Our 
premise in the selection, however, is founded on cur- 
rent rumor; we will add that it is the opinion of con- 
servative and leading fanciers thatthe selection could 
hardly be a better one. 

Referring again to current lumor, we will state 
authoritatively that statements going the rounds to 
the effect that the club has arranged with Messrs. 
Frank Dole, Ben Lewis and George Thomas to each 
bring out a string of Eastern dogs is entirely without 
foundation. If such action had ever been contem- 
plated by one or more of the club officials the matter 
has been passed in a possitively negative manner. 

Again listening to the chirrup of the song sparrow, 
the story has been circulated that the three high 
lights of the fancy mentioned were coming out here 
this spring. We have tried to trace the story down, 
but cannot get any corroboration. At all events the 
vUit will not receive official encouragemont in the 
substantia' or discriminating manner intimated. 

Fanciers who might feel a bit discouraged at pro- 
sp ictive Eastern competition may now rest easy on 
that score. 

Reliable information received during the week is to 
the effect positively that there will be a big A K. C. 
show In this city annually henceforth, and that each 
succeeding show will be better than its predecessor, 
If anplioation, enthusiasm and efforts for the general 
interest of dogdom will cut any figure in reachingsuch 
a result. 

P. K. L. Meeting in Seattle. 

At a conference of Pacific Kennel League delegates, 
held in Seattle, Wash., January 24th, and partici- 
pated in by representatives of every show-giviDg P. 
K L. club on the Pacific Coast, the American Kennel 
Club, from which the league seceded seven years ago, 
was extended a final opportunity to grant self-govern- 
ment to Western clubs as a condition precedent to 
their return to that organization. Delegates repre- 
senting the Victoria, Vancouver, Seattle, Tacoma, 
Portland, California Collie, Old English Sheep Dog, 
Pacific Collie and Santa Clara County Kennel Clubs 
were present. 

The demands of the league formulated at the meet- 
ing, in substance contemplate self-government in all 
essential particulars, through the medium of a 
Pacific Advisory Board, which the American Kennel 
Club now maintains on this Coast, but which, it was 
claimed, is a mere figurehead, with no authority to 
modify existing rules to conform to Pacific Coast con- 
ditions. The delegates expressed slight hope that 
the New York club will grant the concessions de- 
manded. It was determined that, in the event of 
the American Kennel Club rejecting the demands 
made upon it, all Northwestern clubs combine to aid 
the California members of the league, both with en- 
tries and, if need be, with money, to tbe end <,hat it 
may successfully combat with the American Kennel 
Club in that State. 

The matter of the e tablishment of a studbook for 
the registration of Pacific Coast dog9 was discussed, 
but action was deferred in deference to the wishes of 
the California clubs who desire to investigate the 
advisability of this step before casting their votes in 
favor of the move. 

The Birmingham dog show, the oldest in the world, 
has passed and gone, and was a successful fixture. 
Instituted in 1859, when a small show of sporting dogs 
was organized, it has been held continuously ever 
since, and has maintained its sportiner dog feature to 
this day. Its first president was Viscount Curzon, 
and either a duke or an earl has been its figurehead 
each year since the society's foundation. The show 
is run by a syndicate who own the locale, the Curzon 
Hill (so named in honor of the society's first presi- 
dent), which has become quite inadequate to contain 
the quantity of dogs now benched annually at the 
show. The entries this year reached the record of 
1731, the quality being quite up to the average. 



About $10,000 in cash prizes in addition to many 
valuable cups and other trophies offered by clubs and 
individuals comprise the premium list of the twenty- 
eighth annual show of the Westminster Kennel Club, 
which will be held at Madison Square Garden from 
February 10 to 13, inclusive. The premiums will be 
distributed among 427 classes, and the prizes will be 
awarded on the basis of $15 to the winning dog, $10 to 
the second, and $5 to the tbi-d. In winners' classes 
rosettes will be given as first prize, while puppies and 
novices will receive a silver medal. 

In the list of special prizes offered by members of 
the Westminster Kennel Club, W. K. Vanderbilt, Jr., 
gives a silver cup for the best Old English Sheep Dog. 
A cup from Harry Payne Whitney will go to the best 
Beagle. George De Forest Grant offers a cup for tbe 
best Pointer. Andrew Miller, a cup for tbe best 
Clumber Spaniel; and James McGovern, a cup for the 
best Irish Terrier. A number of medals are offered 
by the St. Petersburg Dog Society for Bloodhounds, 
Deerhounds, Greyhounds, Foxhounds, Pointers, and 
Setters and the Westminster Kennel Club offers $150 
or plate for the best pack of Foxhounds, the property 
of a recognized hunt club, and shown by the M. F. H. 
in hunting costume, and $150 plate for the best pack 
of Beagles. 

St. Bernards will have the Ruppert, Waters, and 
Gould Challenge Cups to contest for, and the Great 
Dane Club of America oilers the Presidents' Cup, 
presented by J. Blackburn Miller for the best Ameri- 
can Great Dane under fifteen months old, and the 
Grand Challenge Trophy for the best team of four 
Great Danes. 

Collies are well provided for, the Collie Club of 
America Trophy, valued at $300, going to the best 
American-bred Collie, and the Van Schaick Cup, 
valued at $300, to the best Collie at the show. Be- 
sides the many specials to be given by the Bulldog 
Club of America, the Bulldog Club of Canada and 
the Long Island Kennel Club have offered cups or 
medals in the various classes. 

In the class for Toy Spaniels She Champion Hollo 
Challenge Cup, presented by Mrs. A. M. Raymond 
Mallock, will bo given to the best American-bred 
orange and white English Toy Spaniel, but it must 
be captured five times before becoming the permanent 
property of the owner of the winning Spaniel. The 
Crestwood Challenge Cup, presented by Mrs. F. J. 
Sternberg, will be awarded to the best Japanese 
Spaniel, and the Breeders' Cup to the beat Toy 
Spaniel. 

The Ladies' Kennel Club of Massachusetts will be 
prominent in the distribution of special prizes, which 
includes the Grand Challenge Trophy, presented 
by Mrs. J. W. M. Cardeza, for the best Great Dane 
under fifteen months old; the Mis9es M. L. Harris 
Trophy, for the best Boston Terrier under fifteen 
pounds, and the Officers' Puppy Bowl, for the best 
puppy of any breed bred and owned by a member. 

Premium lists and entry forms can be obtained of 
Jam -9 Mortimer, Secretary and Superintendent, 
Townsend Building, 1123 Broadway, New York. 



On a hot day drink Jackson's Napa Soda lemonade 
and be refreshed. 



J. W. R. Dickson. 

[By One Who Knew Him.] 

On the 19th inst., the coursing world of the Pacific 
Coast lost one of its best authorities and most ener- 
getic enthusiasts in the person of John W. Ronayne- 
Dickson, who passed away at St. Joseph's Hospital, 
in this city, after a lingering illness. 

Born In Ireland in February, 1830, ho was brought, 
when about six months old, by his mother to join his 
father at Newburyport, Mass. At the age of twelve 
years he was sent to learn the printing trade. After 
two years of hard struggle with the art that makes 
the world, he bade it farewell, and took a berth 
aboard the United States sbip-of-war Brandy wiDe as 
mebs boy to some of tbe officers. 

For several years he continued with the Brandy- 
wine, visiting many of the Atlantic and Gulf ports of 
the United States as well as Central and South 
America. 

After being paid off from the Brandywine, he re- 
turned to Newburyport and entered the printing 
business to finish the trade. 

His voyage in the Brandywine had, however, made 
him discontented with the humdrum village life of 
Newburyport, so when he was about twenty-two 
years of age and the whole world was excited over the 
fabulous gold discoveries oi California and Australia, 
the young man, with nearly three-quarters of the 
men of Newburyport, caught the intoxicating gold 
fover, and determined to be one of its patients. 

At Boston two American vessels were fitting out 
for the Eldorado — one for Melbourne, Australia, and 
the other for California. Unable to decide in which 
place to cast his lot, young Dickson tossed a coin, 
heads being for the Antipodes, and tails for California. 



Heads won, and a few days later the youDg seeker 
after wealth, with several companions, were sailing 
to the Southern Hemisphere. 

His adventures in the gold fields of Australia were 
exciting enough to satisfy the most adventurous of 
spirit. Three times he held faoulously rich claims, 
and three times threw them up to chase "rainbows," 
for as he did not immediately strike rich color he 
believed the claims were "duffers." But those who 
came after and got down to the bed-rock reaped 
riches unthought of. 

Becoming dissatisfied with digging for "rainbows'' 
he tried his hand at cattle and sheep raising, and it 
was on the cattle and sheep farms of Victoria he got 
his first and thorough experience of coursing, or 
rather hunting, the kangaroo with hounds especially 
bred and trained for the sport of all sports. 

It was on the immense plains that he learned to be 
a thorough crosscountry rider, as only a youDg 
Australian ''back-blocks" rider can be, for in hunting 
tbe kangaroo unless a man is a superb horseman aud 
has finest of nerve, the keenest of eyes, coolest brain 
and quick, good judgment, then look for disaster. 
After co<ning many a "cropper," young Dickson 
learned that there was no finer sport in the world 
than kangaroo coursing. 

It was while rounding up cattle and sheep that be 
learned of the new Eldorado of New ZealaDd, and 
although offered a quarter share in what has since 
become one of the finest sheep and cattle farms in the 
world, Mr. Dickson would not remain, the gold fever 
being too strong on him, and had to run its course. 

On the voyage to New Zealand he becameacquainted 
with the lady who afterwards became his wife, who 
with her parents and rest of the family were going to 
try their fortunes in the "land of all climates." 

Hissuccessin New Zealand was not much bet'er 
than in Australia, and as the newspapers of that 
colony were offering premiums for printers, Dickson 
again laid down the pick and shovel and handled tbe 
type once more. For several years be continued 
steady at the business, and marrying settled down as 
a man of affairs. He soon accumulated wealth, and 
founded several newspapers in the colony, all of which 
are prominent'and thriving at this day. 

In the great depression of the seventies, which 
taxed the strength of the richest corporations in the 
colonies, he lost all of his wealth. With but a few 
pounds saved out of the wreck of his great fortuce 
he came to California in the early eighties. 

For years in New Zealand he was a prominent 
patron of all sport, but coursing was his greatest de- 
light. He owned several very fine and well known 
Greyhounds, which all earned substantial prizes. 

Here in San Francisco be was about the first to 
ad vocate and introduce enclosed coursing, and when 
about eight years ago he purchased the California 
Turf and devoted a portion of its columns to tbe 
sport, the coursing fraternity was backed up to the 
upper notch. So hard and well and long did he labor 
for his favorite pastime that he lived to see it become 
the leading sport it is at present in California. 

For years he contributed articles on coursing in Cal- 
ifornia to local and Eastern newspapers under the 
nom de plume of 'Gazehound"; and those articles were 
quoted in sporting new spapers throughout the world. 
Many of the opinions he promulgated in tbeee articles 
to-day stand as authority, showing that his judgment 
did not err. Within tbe last few years, however, be 
was wont to allow the more youthful and energetic 
scribes to exercise their ideas and opinions, and then 
would commend, or pleasantly show the errors in 
their remarks. Although he could at times be an ex- 
tremely bitter writer, yet very, very seldom did be 
permit his cool judgment to be overcome by the heat 
of the argument. 

He was an extremely pleasant man to talk to, with 
always a kind, sympathetic word for everyone. 
Thousands have received fiom him money which be 
could not in the least afford. The writer recalls 
walking with him along Montgomery street one even- 
ing when one of that thoroughfare's numerous "pan- 
handlers" stopped him for alms. Tbe old man looked 
at the fellow for a moment, put his fingers :n his right 
vest pocket and immediately withdrawing it, handed 
a coin to the man, saying: "There, may it do you 
good ! " As we passed on, I asked: "What have you 
left yourself? " "Ob, that does rot matter; I'll see 
David, " referring to his son. David bappene d to be 
in the country, but the "good Lord did provide." 

The late Mr. Dickson was a great reader, and with 
his extensive travels, was a very entertaining conr- 
panion. He bad a great many sterling friends in San 
Francisco, and was always wont to speak and write of 
them in the highest terms. For the last two years 
his mind was failing rapidly, and at times he could 
not remembar the simplest incident. He was remark- 
ably fond of flowers and the beauties of nature. His 
favorite walk was generally through Golden Gate 
Park, which he considered to be the most beautiful 
of the many parks he bad visited. 

In New Zealand a widow and grown family mourn 
his death, while in San Francisco his son David lives 
an invalid. In one of his notebooks are these fare- 
well lines: 

. . . Songs have power to quiet 

Tbe restless pulse of care. 
And come like benediction 

That follows after prayer. 

Mr. Lew Pierce, of this city, has recently received 
from the East a Boston Terrier dog and a French 
Bull bitch. Coquette is a handsome brindle and won 
3d novice of the L. K. A . show last fall in New York — 
a good win in warm company. The Boston is a Ch. 
Remlik Bonnie young dog. 19 months old and it is 
claimed was among the ribbons at tbe Ladies' and 
also the Boston Terrier show at Boston. Both dogs 
will be entered at our spring show. 



Matt. Coffey, the popular secretary of the Sacra- 
mento Kennel Club, has been appointed Chief of 
Police of the capital city. We wish him success in 
his new vocation. Chief Coffey's fancy runs to Col- 
lies; he had a kennel of four on the bench at the 
December show. 



January 30, 1904, 



cThc gvccbcv an^ £■ ports man 



9 



Origin of Some Names of Dogs. 

The Setter originally was a dog used by game hunt- 
ers who captured the birds with a net. The dog 
would locate the birds; the netters would then spread 
their net over the ground where the birds wore. The 
dog was trained to set on its haunches while the net 
was being laid. 

The Spaniel Is so called because the original breed 
of this beautiful and intelligent typecamo from Spain, 
and tha Brat arrivals in England were called Spanish 
dogs. 1 

The Spitz dog got its name from its sharp pointed 
nose. "Spitz" means "sharp point" in German, and 
the Spitz was a favorite German breed before he be- 
came known in England and America. The Spitz is 
known also as Dalmatian dog, because his native 
home is Ualmatia. 

The Dachshund is another German breed, and his 
funny name — almost as long and funny as the dog 
himself — is a German name, meaning "badger dog." 
The original Dachshund was used for drawing 
badgers, and thedogt still are great favorites among 
German hunters, although the breed has now become 
a little too delicate for righting such a gray old war- 
rior as the badger. 

The Fox Terrier earned his name, not from any 
fancied resemblance to the fox, but because long ago, 
in the daysof "merrie Kngland," these terriers, much 
larger and stronger then, were used everywhere by 
sportsmen for drawing and killing the fox, they being 
sent down into his burrow. It is said that no good 
Fox Terrier ever backed out of a burrow without his 
fox. If he came out he had the dead fox gripped. If 
be didn't get the fox he didn't come out, but died 
there. 

The Bulldog used to drive cattle, and as he was 
trained to meet the rushes of the bull by seizing him 
by his most sensitive point — the nose — the sturdy, 
brave dog came to be known in time as Bulldog. In 
some countries he is known as bull biter. 

The beautiful Blenheim Spaniel is named after 
Blenheim Castle, wtere this dog first was made fash- 
ionable in the time of the great Marlborough. The 
King Charles Spaniel owes its name to the merry 
monarch. 

The various breeds of hounds to-Jay are called 
hounds beciuse they are the present survivors of the 
time when all hunting dogs were used to hound game. 
In the early hunting days of England every dog that 
was used to accompany the hunt was selected mainly 
for his speed and endurance. There were hounds 
that were supposed to follow the game by scent, and 
others who were supposed to sight it a long way off, 
but all were expected to be able to run the game 
down. Consequently, while the name of hound, or 
"bund" in tae ancient Saxon, was first U9ed for all 
kinds of dogs, it finally came to denote huntingdogs 
only; that is why we call our running dogs hounds 
to-day, such as Greyhounds, Rabbitbounds, Blood- 
hounds, .Wolfhounds, Boarhounds, Deerhounds, etc. 



Frank F. Dole states that four of his dogs died at 
his kennel9 in New Haven from distemper during- the 
last month, at a loss of over $1000. The dogs lost 
included three not9d prize winners, the Boston Terrier 
Edgewood White: Bull Terrier Gold Dollar II; and 
the Bull Terrier Edgewood Justine. 



The Late M. C. Allen. 



Merton C. Allen, for many years a well known 
newspaper man of this city, and more recently a 
deputy in the office of the City and County Treasurer, 
passed away Sunday morning at the Lane Hospital. 
He had been ailing the past four months from tuber- 
culous peritonitis. Two weeks ago bis condition 
became so serious that he was compelled to take to 
his bed. He *as subsequently removed to the 
hospital, where an operation was performed last 
Friday morning. 

He was several years ago an enthusiastic devotee 
of trap shooting, and was a promiuent member of the 
Olympic Gun Club and of the California Inanimate 
Trap Shooting Association. 



Egg Diet for Sportmen. 



The streams of California are to be enriched by a 
wealth of fish unprecedented in the history of the 
State. Many thousands of these small fry will be sent 
to the different counties for planting in the local 
streams. The California Fish Commission has up- 
ward of 30,000,000 salmon eggs in process of hatching 
at the Sisson hatchery, and 0,000,000 at the Eel river 
station. Over 28,000,000 young salmon have been lib- 
erated In the headwaters of the Sacramento river 
within the past two months, making a total of over 
60,000,000 salmon eggs which are handled jointly by 
the United States and California Fish Commissions. 
The largest number ever handled before in this State, 
in 1897-98, was 48,000,000, a gain of 12,000,000 eggs for 
the year, and represents the largest number of salmon 
eggs ever handled in any State in one season. They 
were collected by the United States Fish Commission 
at Baird, on the McCloud river, and on Battle and 
Mill creeks. The United States Fish Commission is 
making a shipment of 500,000 eggs to New Zealand. 
With the exception of about 2,000,000 eggs hatched 
at Biird, the remainder is being handled by the Cali- 
fornia Fi-.li Commission. 



Strike!— If they don't give you Jackson's Napa 
So'da when you ask for it. 



Wild Game Reservations. 



An important meeting was neld in Fresno, says the 
Republican of the 24lb insl., with reference to the 
eslallishment of game refuges in the forest reserve. 
President H. T. Payne of the California Fi»h and 
Game Protective association was here and with htm 
were the members of the special eommmltleu for the 
Sierra reserve appointed by hlni, consisting ol George 
\V. Stewart aim J. Sub Johnson of Viaalla ana S>. Oi 
St. John aim Andrew L). Ferguson of this county. 
Joseph Harcrolt, ol Madera, w ho Is the fifth member 
of the committee, was unable to be present. 

"There is a bill ponding In l'ongre»s," said Presi- 
dent Payne last night, In explaining the objects ol the 
meeting and what has been done, "authorizing the 
Department of the Interior to set apart certain dis- 
tricts of the forest reserves as game breeding refuges, 
where there shall never be any shooting and no game 
shall ever be killed. At the last meeting ol our asso- 
ciation, la discussing the matter, it was pointed out 
the Department ol the Interior could by no possi- 
bility possess any agent so familiar with the localities 
as to by able to make 1 nlelligen t selections of land for 
such refuges. So 1 was instructed to appoint a com- 
mittee in each of the districts that would be affected 
to be composed of men thoroughly acquainted with 
the country, who would select the favored ground 
and recommend such selections to the department. 
The meeting today was the second that has been 
held, the first having been held at Santa Barbara last 
week, when two locations were selected, one of three 
townships and the other of about two in the Pine 
Mountain and Zaca lake reserve. 

"The committee to-day wont into the subject very 
thoroughly and while the recommendations are in a 
measure in abeyance awaiting the submission of the 
suggestions to Mr. Barerofl for his approval, it was 
agreed that there should be three locations recom- 
mended to be set apart for game refuges — one of five 
townships in Tulare county, one of six or seven town- 
ships in this county and the other in Madera county . 

"These refuges will be shut to the hunter for all 
time and the game will resort to them to livo there. 
In the winter, as the cold forces them into the lower 
country, they will be protected by the State law. In 
the meantime the refuges will be breeding grounds, 
and as the game of all kinds shall multiply, the in- 
crease will find the way to the outside and the shoot- 
ing will be better for all the people of the country. 
It is the one way to save wild game from annihila- 
tion." 

Colonel Payne will go to Del Key to-day to visit 
friends there and will go home to San Francisco to- 
morrow." 

It is getting along to the end of the month and sal- 
ary day is nigh, for Colonel Payne, as he is known in 
some places, is by vocation a paid State deputy fish 
commissioner. 

Game refuges are without doubt a very good thing 
and will do much to save "a valuable food supply for 
the people." In the sending bill there is surely some 
provision for the selection of the game refuges and 
any contingent expense necessary. The Department 
of the Interior could possibly make a good selection 
also. 

Just why the California Fish and Game Protective 
Association can have this work done at the expense 
of the State is a puzzle that many sportsmen would 
like to have solved. Particularly so, as one of the 
principal reasons urged for inability to patrol fishing 
waters and hunting districts, it has been claimed, is 
theinadequateannual appropriations and correspond- 
ingly small force of field deputies. "We can't be 
everywhere you know, and we do the best we can on a 
small appropriation." Possibly the "Colonel" was 
on a vacation and the work was performed gratui- 
tously, for the "Colonel" is a presistent and enthusi- 
astic worker and has the courage of bis convictions. 

Several years ago, he deemed it his special province 
to purge local and Coast dogdom of n^any, to him, 
objectionable features that did not meet the approval 
of his critical eye. He wrought vigorously end kept 
at It until he was disqualified by the American Kennel 
Club; dogdom was in the throes of dissolution and 
the Pacific Kennel League was hatched, phoenix like, 
In the a«hes of the weekly conflagration attributed to 
the Colonel's fiery pen. 

Now he has gore to the othor extreme, for after 
nearly killing off the dogs, 'he now wants to savo all 
of the game and fish; every continental fin, fur and 
feather. If he keepB on it may, in the near future, 
be a crime to kill a duck. He has succeeded in making 
It a crime to sell a quail, but, we will stay with blm 
on that proposition, that has accomplished some 
good — but It was bad for the Crows. 

Deputy Fish Commissioner Payne is an adept in 
getting notices from the interior press. The question 
arises with sportsmen and taxpayers as well, why is 
it that he is Invariably mentioned as President 
Payne of the California Fish and Game Protective 
Association, or as Colonel Payne, never as a paid 
state deputy fish commissioner. 

If we are not decidedly mistaken the State pays 
his traveling expenses and salary — In fact we once 
heard the Colonel state at a meeting of the associa- 
tion in this city, that he would do the necessary 
proselyting work free of expense to the association, 
which was a very magnanimous offer. 

Why is the state board continually sidetracked and 
placed' in the undignified position of footing the bills 
and allowing the credit to go to an association that 
could not muster a larger attend an oe than «na present 
at the last annual meeting of the much vaunted state 
association of sportsmen at Paso Bobles. As a rep- 
resentative organization the attendance of sportsmen 
was sadly lacking. 

We have heard the Colonel described as a "cuckoo, " 
but of course, in a »pirit of jocular admiration for his 
great executive and argumentative abilities The 
steering committee of tho "apostle* of game protec- 
tion" seems to bo hatching eggs right along In the 
state Incubator. 



Why Game Birds are so High. 

"Game dealers and shippers have found a new 
enemy who is robbing them," says the Kansas City 
Timts. "Not only are they harassed by the game 
wardens of the differ, tit localities, out of which they 
attempt to ship game birds, unlawfully, but many 
packages aro being tampered with by railroad and 
express company employes while en route to their 
destination. It is said on good authority that two 
express messengers running between Texas and 
Kansax points, make a prae.it I robbing the hunt- 
ers who ship game north, surreptitiously. They 
have boxes of their own and when they take on 
parcels which contain game they take out as many 
birds as they can without Implicating themselvts. 
These they consign to game dealers in New York 
and Chicago. The birds sell for nigh prices. yuBll 
sell for $4 and $5 a dozen and prairie chicken for f 10 
and 912 a dozen. One messenger is known to have 
taken 371 quail and 92 prairie chickens from a parcel 
received in Oklahoma. Another package shipped 
from South Canadian, Ok., was short BO prairie 
chickens and 280 quail when it reached its destination. 

It is unlawful lor the railroad and express com- 
panies to carry game illegally killed or bought. 
Dealers and shippers resort to many schemes for 
shipping birds. They place them in all sorts of 
packages and disguise shipments as much as pos- 
sible. Trunks are frequently used. At Weather- 
ford, Texas, the dealers attempted to ship birds in 
coffin boxes. They had difficulty in securing the 
necessary death certificates and were obliged to use 
other means. 

The hunters and shippers who forward game to 

market do so at their own risk. The combination of 
watch ful wardens and pilfering messengers has dis- 
couraged many old-time hunters. Indirectly, It has 
made prices for quail and prairie chicken almost pro- 
hibitive." 

When an individual is engaged, profitably, is an 
illegal business, there can always be found hungry 
cormorants who are watching for the chance to get a 
rake-off, no matter by what means, for the "quiet 
license" collector knows his victim dare not "squeal." 
Of the two the fellow who does the skinning Is the 
worst. 

Kansas City can not be the only place in the United" 
States where game and fish are for sale illegally. For 
the little bird says again tbat quail have been openly 
sold In our local markets recently and that the stalls 
in the fish markets have had, scarcely hidden from 
ordinary observation, boxes of underweight striped 
bass. We don't believe it, however, for the Fish 
Commission has made a spurt or two recently and 
several arrests, convictions and fines followed. 

Chief Deputy Vogelsang and Deputy A. F. Lee re- 
cently made a trip to Trinity county and were suc- 
cessful in arresting and subsequently convicting four 
men for killing does. This conviction was made after 
1900 miles of traveling by rail and stage, back and 
forth in gathering evidence and trailing the suspects. 
The arrested were F. and H. Chad bourne, G. Nelson 
and F. Rathbone of Suisun. They were taken before 
a Weaverville justice, two trips being necessary, it 
seems, to make tho arrests. The Chad bournes were 
fined $50 each and the other two $25 each. 

Brav o! a 19(H) mile trip is a task that not every 
officer would have the temeritv to tackle when there 
is a possible chance of rounding up "big fish" in this 
city. 

In the arrest and conviction of Mr. and Mrs. Crow 
a fortnight or so ago, "it is believed that the mystery 
of the arrival of quail in the local market, to the con- 
sternation of the deputy game commissioners, has 
been solved. For a long time the deputies have been 
baffled in their attempts to learn who it was that was 
bringing quail and selling the birds to commission 
merchants contrary to the law which prohibits satis 
being made," said a morning contemporary in pub- 
lishing the usual game violation guff. 

Mrs. Crow was arrested at a commission bouse 
while in the act of selling a basket full of game. 
Deputy J.C. Ingalls made the arrest and ho says be 
saw the negotiations for the sale being conduced . 
He took charge of the woman and booked bet at the 
City Prison on a charge of violating the game law. 

He tracked Mrs. Crow from the ferry building to 
the commission house. Ingalls says tbat with her 
husband and, he thinks, another couple, Mrs. Crow 
lives in camps which are moved about In Alameda 
county to meet tho exigencies of the occasion. The 
men make a business of huntirg and Mrs. Crow brings 
the birds across the bay, concealing tbem in a basket 
which would not arouse any suspicions." 

The Crows were fined $25 apiece for cause. 
Nevermore will the woi.drou* basket bring enough 
quail to market to supply the hotels, clubs, restau- 
rants and retail dealers with the quantity necessary 
to fill the loc'l demand for tho toothsome quail. The 
Crows' goose Is cooked. 

From tho reports, which we now believe wore un- 
reliable, It was thought that there must have been 
man v hunters epgaged in many districts in the Illegal 
traffic. Thlsldea grew out of an old story resurrected 
from the past, when It was legitimate to sell quail in 
market, that the commission dealers would dally or 
twice a week sond out a circular of prices for game, 
or that they would send special requests for so many 
dozen to boused In filling particular ordors, etc. But 
all this must be ovor now and naught is left of the 
practice save a memory. 



Salmon fishing in Montorey bay was, early this 
week, first class, there being an immense run of fish 
on. Several largo salmon were taken, one fish weighed 
over 40 pounds. 



Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feat 



10 



[January 30, 1984 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



The open season for quail in San Mateo county will 
close on February loth. The season has not been 
favorable to good sport. Limit bags have been the 
exception. The scarcity of water and feed has kept 
the birds generally in the most inaccessible regions. 
The hatching of young birds, too, was far below the 
average. . 

Two sportsmen (?) of Redlands, San Bernardino 
county, recently killed 150 quail in a day's hunt. So 
proud were they of the exploit that they had the 
bunch of birds photographed. A copy fell into the 
hands of the Fish Commission, and as a result, each 
hunter was arrested for exceeding the limit, and paid 
a fine of $25. 

Los Angeles sportsmen have had generally a good 
duck shooting season. Last Sunday excellent bags 
were the rule on the marshe9, and the shooters re- 
turned at night satisfied with the day's sport. John 
Hauerwaas, Gen. C. F. A. Last and a party of local 
sportsmen shot over the Green Wing marshes and 
were fairly successful. Limits were brought in from 
one of the Ballonm grounds, the killing being mostly 
sprig and widgeon. 

The Canadian blue ribbon trap shoot, the Grand 
Canadian Handicap, live birds, came off at Hamilton, 
Can., on the 14th inst. The principal event, 20 birds, 
27 to 32 yards rise was participated in by 43 shooters. 
In this race, eight high guns served 19 birds each, 
there was an exceedingly lively lot of pigeons trapped 
thi9 year. Each of the eight shooters used a Parker 
gun (the "Old Reliable"). In the shoot-off H. M. 
Mayhew was first and Harry Kirkover was second. 

The target events took place on the 12th and 13th 
insts. J. R. Graham (one of the live bird high guns) 
was second high gun at the inanimate target traps. 
The meeting was the 14th annual tournament of the 
Hamilton Gun Club. 

Duck shooting, according to the Solano Republican, 
had improved on the marshes near Solano county 
recently. A fortnight ago the storms of the previous 
week had the effect of driving ducks from the bay to 
the marshes, and most hunters who were out on the 
17th inst. secured good bags. 

A hunting party consisting of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis 
Pierce of Suisun, Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Ford of San 
Francisco and Mr. Gus Bloom of Chicago, enjoyed a 
good day's shoot at Mr. Pierce's Boynton ponds. 
Over 80 ducks were bagged. 

Mayor W. H. Bryan and District Attorney T. T. C. 
Gregory killed over twenty ducks each at one of the 
Stewart ponds. 

There was a full attendanceat the Suisun Gun Club, 
ten hunters killing over 250 ducks. Those who en- 
joyed the shooting were: J. C. Klein, editor of the 
Oakland Herald, Wickham and Harrold Havens, J. 
R. Burnham, Walter Woods and C. H. Wethprby of 
Oakland, Joseph Peltier, Attorney Allen L.Chlcker- 
ing, Doctor Proctor and Arthur Goodfellow of San 
Francisco. Mr. Wetherby remained at the club 
house until Thursday morning. 

The following bags were made on the "Bunco" 
ponds a week ago: Meyer Dinkelspiel 25, Milton 
Emigh 14, Ben Reams 20. 

Dr. A. G. Bailey and Geo. C. Gordon bagged 26 
ducks on the "Bunco" ponds. 

Otto Feudner, Walter Cooper and two friends of the 
former bagged 160 ducks on the Stewart ponds. 

H. Coffin, of the firm of Baker & Hamilton, 3an 
Francisco, was the guest of Clare Morrill on a hunt. 
They killed 40 canvasbacks and mallards. 

Attorney Louis Titus and J. Juster of Berkeley had 
a successful shoot on Joyce Island, Sunday, the for- 
mer securing 35 and the latter 16. 

On Monday of last week Geo. K. Harding and L. H. 
Pimentel bagged 60 ducks on the slough 

Supervisor D. M. Fleming and Dr. C. E. Turner, of 
Vallejo, accompanied by Sheriff James A. Keys and 
J. A. Wilson, spent two days of last week in a hunt 
on the Abe Crump place on the Sacramento river 
near Rio Vista and succeeded in bagging 135 ducks, 
108 of which were mallards. 

J. A. Wilson and J. W. Harper killed 26 snipe on 
the ground between Union avenue and the railroad 
in the northern suburbs of Suisun last Friday 
evening. 

Rev. James Hall and J. C. Musser bagged a good 
s tring of ducks on the slough last Saturday. 

James W. Boa, the Winchester representative, won 
high average on targets at the Hamilton Gun Club 
tournament on the 12th and 13th insts. 



Harvey McMurchy, the genial representative of the 
Hunter Arms Company, is due in the city about the 
end of February. "Prince Mac" will get hero just 
too late for duck shooting, a sport he used to enjoy 
immensely on the ponds near Alvarado. 

A great many San Jose sportsmen are taking ad- 
vantage of the few remaining days of the open season 
for the killing of ducks and quail. There has been a 
great exodus of hunters to the marshes and mount- 
ains during the week and all report excellent sport, 
so states the .Utvury. ' 

Duck hunters have especially been well rewarded 
for their efforts. The birds are now more plentiful 
on the local marshes than they have been at any time 
during the open season. There are thousands of teal 
and canvasbacks with a good sprinkling of several 
other varieties, especially widgeon and mallard. 

The late storm has had a tendency to drive the 
bird9 from the open waters of the bay, and they have 
sought shelter in the inland sloughs where they fall 
an easy prey to the skillful hunter. Duck hunting 
will now continue good, it is olaimed, until the end of 
the season, in fact canvasbacks will continue to bo- 
come more plentiful as they are still arriving in largo 
numbers from the north, they being the last birds to 
seek shelter in the warm waters of the south. 



Robin and quail hunters have found good sport 
throughout the county during the week, and several 
have secured large bags of the birds. Numerous Hocks 
of pigeons have been driven from the high mountains 
by the cold weather and they are to be found in the 
hills back of Los Gatos and back of Evergreen. 

Frank Coy kendall left last week for the San Joaquin 
country in his yacht on a duck hunting expedition. 
He did not find very good shooting until he came to 
"Old River, " situated between Stockton and Tracy, 
where he states that there are thousands of ducks 
and that he had- the best shooting he had had in 
years. Mallard predominate, and it was an easy 
matter for him to secure the bag limit every day 
without any great effort. Hi9 brother, Rache Coy- 
kendall, left on Thursday to join in the sport. 

Ed Draper and Tom Taggert of San Jose recently 
returned from a two weeks' duck hunt near Pesca- 
dero. They report that the tide water at the mouth 
of Pescadero Creek was closed and that a big lagoon 
had formed and the water was backing up very 
rapidly, and if the bar formed is not soon opened the 
water threatens to Hood the town of Pescadero. On 
this lagoon were thousands of ducks and shooting was 
at its best. Sportsmen from Santa Cruz and other 
neighboring towns went there and a great amount of 
game is being killed. Any hunter can easily secure 
the bag limit of fifty birds in a day. Hunters who 
cannot gratify their wishes at other places will surely 
be ablo to meet with success in that locality. Besides 
being an excellent spot for duck shooting, there is 
also excellent quail and wild pigeon shooting back in 
the hills. 

Willis Laine and Loui6 Wanderer of Santa Clara 
went to Murphyson Wednesday where a large flock 
of pigeons had made their appearance. They suc- 
ceeded in bagging all they could carry. 

John Decost bagged a long string of ducks and 
snipe in the fields north of Milpitas during the week. 

B. F. Van Horn of Santa Clara returned from a 
week's quail hunt in the Bayou country back of 
Mount Hamilton. He says there was plenty of snow 
and that it was an easy matter to bag game. He 
killed many quail, two large wild cats and a beau- 
tiful red fox. 

Emile Houssoy was one of the successful duck 
hunters at Alviso the past week. He returned to San 
Jose with a bag of 33 "cans" and teal. 

Van L. Suggs bagged 25 quail last Sunday between 
the Guadalupe and Los Gatos. The birds are quite 
tame since the storm. 

Thos. S. Burnight is about again after a severe ill- 
ness and has gone to Carmel in Monterey county for 
an extended quail hunt. He will hunt on the ranch 
of Joseph Stewart, which is one of the best quail 
grounds in Monterey county. 

George Keesling found excellent shooting on the 
Alviso marshes Friday. He reports ducks plentiful 
since the rain and that shooting will now improve 
until the end of the season. 

Dr. W. E. Wadams of Santa Clara continues to 
make his weekly pilgrimages to his favorite hunting 
grounds at Alviso. His last string secured consisted 
of 46 fat birds. Dr. Wadams is one of the best shots 
in the county and is always sure of a good string of 
game if there is any to be had. 

Louis Maggini bagged a number of "cans" at Warm 
Springs the other day. 

Manfred Quimby, the crack shot of Agnews, bagged 
a number of teal along the ditches near the asylum 
the other day. Snipe are also very plentiful in that 
vicinity. 

H. M. Jamison, J. S. Parker and R. L. Jamison 
have returned from the San Joaquin, where they 
hunted ducks and geese for a week. They came home 
by way of Pacheco Pass. Duck shooting at Los 
Banos was a disappointment, although they managed 
to kill a few birds. 

Otto Feudner with C. G. H. Macbride and Dan 
Flannery of San Jose shot a combined bag of over 100 
mallard^ teal and sprig on the Stewart ponds last 
Sunday. 

L. H. Kimmel, one of the coming shots of the West, 
broke 124 out of 125 clay birds at Bosco, 111., on Jan. 
( .Hh. This is remarkable shooting on the part of an 
amateur; it was done with U. M. C. factory loaded 
shells. The Sunny South Handicap held at Brenham, 
Texas, January 18th to 23d, was won with U. M. C. 
shot shells. Turner E. Hubby, Waco, Texas, won 
the live bird event with a straight score for three 
days. W. H. Heer, Concordia, Kan.-., took the handi- 
cap for targets. Perfect scores show the quality of 
U. M. C. ammunition. 

The U. M. C. party of shooters is organizing gun 
clubs throughout the South, which in a very short 
time will be organized into state leagues. The shoot- 
ing interests of the South have in a large measure 
been neglected, and the party isondeavoring to revive 
the interest. Mayor Tom Marshall reports that it is 
quite a popular fad to organize ladies' clubs. What- 
ever Tom says goes among the ladies. 



Members of a recent hunting party who were on 
the Osage reservation, Indian Territory, state they 
saw wild pigeons in flights in the hills north of the 
Arkansas river. 

The disappearance of the wild pigeon from the 
United States, where once it abounded in vast num- 
bers, was a remarkable event, and the sportsmen 
have never been able to learn the cause. The persons 
who saw wild pigeons in the Osage country were fa- 
maliar with their appearance years ago, and are posi- 
tive that the birds are pigeons. The pigeons wore 
se«n at different places. One hunter saw a single 
pigeon in full flight southward and two other hunters 
saw two pigeons, also flying south. It is alleged that 
a few wild pigeons have been seen this fall in the 
Illinois marsh land east of St Louis. 

Western sportsmen are interested in knowing 
whether the pigeons in the Osage country were 
natives that have remained undisturbed in the remote 
hills since early days, or whether they are strays 



from South America, where the pigeons are supposed 
popularly to have gone. One of the largest roosts in 
the United States was in the Cherokee nation, south- 
east of Tahlequah. 



Salt water fishing in the southern Coast waters has 
been excellent recently. Last Sunday there was an- 
other big run of pompano and king fish at San Pedro 
and East San Pedro. From early morning until dark- 
ness came the wharf on the Terminal Island side was 
crowded with fishermen, and in front of the wharf 
small boats were packed in until it was almost impos- 
sible to move. And everybody got fish. Up to 11 
o'clock in the morning the pompano were in evidence 
all along the wharves. The school appeared to leave 
about that time, but they returned at 4 o'clock, and 
after that the anglers had great sport. The schools 
offish remained right around the East San Pedro 
wharves, and it was a poor fisherman who did not 
pull up at lea9t three fist at one haul several times 
during the day. It was no uncommon sight to see 
a fisherman have four or five fish on his hooks at one 
haul, and this was repeated every few mil u!es. 

This fish is not the pompano of the Gulf waters and 
is generally known as the butter-fish, being a native 
of Japanese waters. 

Any number of hooks may be employed in catching 
the kingfisb. Half a dozen is not an uncommon num- 
ber, and to have the majority of them filled when 
the line is pulled up is not considered much of a feat 
in angling. The kingfish is despised when other kinds 
are plentiful, but are excellent eating during the win- 
ter, as their flesh is hard and of a fairly good flavor 
then. 



Carl Schmidt of the firm of Graef & Schmidt, 107 
Chambers street, New York, importers of fine cutlery 
and American representatives of J. A. Henckels, died 
Sunday nignt, January 17th, at a private sanitarium in 
New York, where he had been undergoing treatment 
for an abscess since January 6th. Mr. Schmidt gave 
his attention only to the large trade between Chic tgo 
and the Pacific Coast, coming to the New York house 
usually twice a year to overhaul his samples, bis wife, 
son and stepdaughter living in Pasadena, California. 

Mr. Schmidt was born in Berlin. Germany, in 
December, 1843, coming to the United States as a boy 
and working his way unassisted to an honorable and 
influential place in the trade solely by his own un- 
assisted efforts. He was of a genial and 6unny dis- 
position and it is said of him that his customers were 
also warm friends. The firm of which he was a part- 
ner was established by Wm. R. Graef and himself in 
January, 1884. The funeral services were held at the 
Stephen Merritt Chapel, New York, and the remains 
cremated at Fresh Pond, Long Island. The business 
will be continued along the same linee as hereto- 
fore. — Iron Age. 



Save the Birds. 



The Audubon Societies, through their organ, Iiird- 
Jjore makes an urgent appeal to the women of 
America to abstain from using aigrettes. It is claimed 
that the herons from which theBe aigrette plumes are 
taken are rapidly approaching extinction. The 
dealers' offer of $32 per ounce for raw plumes tempts 
hunters to defy the law, and It i6 believed that if 
woman does not abandon the use of aigrettes the 
white herons throughout the world will be extermi- 
nated. 

lliid-Lore publishes a detailed statement of the 
facts in the case by William Dutcher, which can be 
obtained in leaflet form from the National Committee 
of Audubon Societies, 525 Manhattan avenue, New 
York city. 



Coming Events. 



Kod. 

April 1-Sept. 10. Oct. 16-Feb. 1— Open season tor taking steel- 
nead in tidewater. 

Nov. 1-Aprll I— Trout season closed. 

July 1-Jan. 1— Open season for black bass. 

Aug. 15-April 1— Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Sept. 1-May 1— Open season for shrimp. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Close season in tidewater for steelhead. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Gun 

July 1-Feb. 15 — Dove season open. 
Nov. 1-July 15— Deer season closed. 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 
sage hen. 

Oct. 15-Feb. 15— Open season ."or quail, ducks, etc 
Bench Shows. 

Jan. 20, 23— Toledo Fanciers' Association. Toledo, O. A. W. 
Lee, Secretary, Toledo, O. 
Jan. 27, 30— National Fanciers' and Breeders' Association. 

Chicago. 

Feb. 2, 7— Ohio State Poultry Association. Columbus, O. W. 
A. Lott, Secretary, Wooster, O. 

Feb. 9, 12— Fanciers' Association of Indiana. Indianapolii, ltd 
C R. Mllhou8, Secretary 

Feb. 10, 13— Westminster Kennel Club, Madison Square Uarden, 
New York. James Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Feb. 18 20— Johnstown Poultry and Kennel Club, Johnstown, Fa 
J. R. Flinn, Superintendent. 

Feb. 22, 25— New England Kennel Club. Boston, Mass. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. 

March 1, 2— Merrimack Valley Kennel Club. Lawrence, Mass. 
Albert Mitchell, Secretary. 

March 2, 5— Duquesne Kennel Club of Western IPennsyKania 
Pittsburg, Pa. Fred S. Stedman, Secretary. 

March 9, 12— Rochester Kennel Club. Roohester, N. Y. H. H. 
Kingston, Secretary: 

March 10, 12— Chicago Kennel Club Chicago, 111. H.J. Cassady 
Secretary. 

March 22, 25— Buffalo Kennel Club. Buffalo, N. Y. E. P Sharp, 

Secretary. 

March 28. 30— Brantford Kennel Club. Brantford, Can. Ttos 
H. Terry. Secretary. 

March 30, April 2— Atlantic City Kennel Club. Atlantic City, 
N. J. Thomas H. Terry. Secretary. 

April 7, 9— Victoria Kennel Club Victoria, B. C. Thos. H 
Torry, Secretary, Victoria, B. C. 



January 30, 1904 : 



(The $veebev hud gftyo xr tg mati 



11 



THE FARM. 



Baby Mutton. 

Baby mutton is a production rai»ed by 
farmers and stock growers which, if put 
upon the market at the earliest, would 
give quick returns and higher prices to 
the owner. Tha majority of marketers 
prefer to buy yearling lambs, rather 
than run the risk of encountering the 
flesh of a wool-bearing sheep, which is 
never fit for food, writes O. Irwin in 
Epitomist. Southdown, Leicester and 
Cotswold are the best breeds raised for 
their flesh especially, as they yield a 
tender, juicy, highly flavored mutton 
which is entirely different from the flee h 
of a wool grower. 

The fat of baby mutton is clear, hard 
and white, while the lean is firm, juicy, 
finely grained and a darkish red in color. 
Baby mutton can be marketed when the 
lambs are ten aDd sixteen weeks old, ar.d 
some as young as eight weeks. Their 
weight at these ages should be forty-five 
pounds. The condition of weight is de- 
termined somewhat accurately by feel- 
ing the brisket and the tail near the 
body. 

A high degrea of fatness is more im- 
portant than weight, as they sell by the 
carcass rather than by weight. The 
weight of two lambs being the same the 
younger one will bring the highest price. 
The evidence of age is the fleece and the 
degree of ossification oil in the bones. 
Growers of mutton who wish to market 
their lambs for baby mutton should feed 
early and push the lambs, as the first 100 
pounds cost much less and bring more 
than the second 100 pounds By selling 
at the earliest and at the highest prices 
the owner can save enough in time and 
feed in the first ten or twelve weeks to 
more than pay for the price he will re- 
ceive when a year old. 

It is not always the weight of stock 
that brings the largest profit to the 
owner when sold, but it is the quickest 
time in which he secures the most for 
his stock at the least cost for feed. This 
is a question that should be studied more 
by shesp growers, the same as the ques- 
tion of "baby beef,'' about which much 
has been said in the farm papers. 



Green Bone. 



My experience with cut bone as a food 
(or fowls extends over two yearB only with 
a flock of 100 liens, writes W. F Adams in 
Farmer's Voice. Prior to that time I had 
not used cut bone. 

I get a soup bone of the butcher, shave 
off the meat (a little meat won't hurt if 
you intend feeding as soon as cut; and I 
feed the same day it is cut. 

Some people make the mistake of using 
bones that have been boiled or lain out 
sun bleached. Some of the most essential 
feeding value of the bone has thus been 
lost, especially as feed for growing chicks. 

For growing chickens, alter two weeks 
old, I mix the bone meal with corn chops 
dampened with curd milk (water will do), 
so that each bird gets from a half to one 
teaspoonful of the bone meal, according 
to age. 

Extra large and quick growth bone in 
fowls means more meat, and more meat 
means 7 to 10 cents per pound. 

For laying hens I feed as above, only 
that each hen gets one tableapoonful 
twice or three times a week, according as 
I think she may need an extra allowance. 
Hens need more when they are laying or 
molting. 

Taking every advantage gained by feed- 
ing bone— i.e., general health of flock, 
quirk growth of broilers, increase in 
amount cf eggs, etc., over the two years 
bone was not fed — I figure it (and I keep 
close account) that the profit derived is 15 
per cent over the profits of the two pre- 
ceding years. This 15 percent is attrib 
uted t ) the bone feed, and the other in- 
crease in profits was credited to the source 
from which they came. 

Now, don't feed any overdose at first, 
or , at any time for that matter ; feed 
regularly. 



Correcting a Setting Hen. 

Agnew, Cal., Jan. 25, 1904. 
Editor Breeder and Sportsman: 
I naturally read with interest anything 
pertaining to poultry, and when I see 
what I think a better way for doing a 
thing I like to present my plans for 
comparison. In the Hueedek asm 
Sportsman for December 19th I saw a 
plan for correcting broody hens by con- 
finement in coop. With us we simply 
turn the hen into another yard among a 
lot of hens she it not acquainted with, 
and her desire to get back again so occu- 
pies her she forgets to hvnt a nest, and 
in throe days regains her composure, so 
to speak. If any of your readers have 
these conditions to contend with they 
should try my scheme. It is a good one 
and sure. Very truly yours, 

W. S. Sullivan, 
Garden Valley Poultry Yards. 

o 

The Tulare HcqxMcr is enthusiastic over 
alfalia. Its says: "The more you cut 
alfalfa the more it thrives. One twenty- 
live acre lield in this State in one year 
yielded * 1*000 worth of hay. It will hunt 
its own water from below if you will give 
it a start. Its roots go down far and rap- 
idly into the earth. A mining tunnel was 
excavated in Nevada ISO feet below an 
alfalfa field and roots of alfalfa were in 
the roof of the tunnel. It has been 
known to grow for twenty-live years, but 
generally needs plowing up a* ten years.'' 



FOR SALE. 

The Green Meadow Farm 

/ 'ONSISTING OF FIFTY ACRES OF THE 
v most productive land Id Santa Clara County, 
located within one-half mile of the Santa Clara 
railroad depot and 100 yardsof the city limits. 
Handsome modern i' room house, commodious sta- 
bles. 50 box stalls, barns, granaries and every 
improvement that goes to make a first class breed- 
ing farm Fine artesian well and abundance of 
water piped to all parts of the place Sewer con- 
nections, gas. electricity, etc : fruit, gardens, big 
alfalfa fields. In avcry respect an Ideal place, 
and one that will increa e in value with each 
year until it becomes bigh-prlced city property 
Will be sold at a bargain if sold without delay. 

Hamiii.btosian Wii.kks (sire of 9 with records 
from 2:0sm to 2:13) and several high class colts 
and road horses for sale. 

Call or address for particulars 

R. I. MOORHEAD. Santa Cla-a.Cal. 



HOW TO KEEP A CAREFUL RECORD 

( »F STALLION SERVICE: BOY MY SERV" 
v Ice Book. It will bring success to you this 
season, making all outstanding accounts collect- 
able and bankable It records all the facts you 
want and Done that you don't want, and each 
service Is secured by bankable note Price of 
book only 50c. My horse bills and stationery are 
best and cheapest. Send to day for free advertis- 
ing offer and sample pages. Address F H. ENO, 
5(0 Mulberry St.. Des Moines. Ia 

GOOD GREEN TROTTER 

tfOB SALE— MARE BY JAMES MADISON 
1 (sire of Addison 2:1 1M. Ella Madison (4) 2:I2!<. 
etc), dam by Nephew (sire of the dam of Bleat a 
%ngH, etc ); weighs IIOO lbs., handsome. go< d 
beaded and square galled Has worked miles li 
2:19 with but little training. A great prospect 
Write for further particulars. FRED E WARD 
1408 Vermont Ave . Los Angeles, Cal. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCK tT 8IZK; 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Ikx k 
of the kind published. 

IIRKKDKK \M> SI'IIRTNMAV, 
:t(t tieary St . s,!,, I ranrlsro 



Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK ICV1 
F»aa1 Csritr 
—4 f itl«r . 
Fuk Sub 

lf.HH 

>U.O0 up 




tfnrt ItM 
B.I rlfla 
I irpl«,»«d 
Al kott 



3«0<jryK.S.F RowmW-20 PS«wUjMISS 




Neglect of a Cough or Sort 
Throat may result In an lnc«f» 
able Throat or Lung Trouhte. 
For relief use BROWNS 
BRONCHIAL TROCHES. 



Soli In Boxei only, jrf J /? 
Avoid Imitation: «JHtl 




$5000 

Reward 

to any jhtsoii who will 
prove any letter <>t 
endorsement we nub 
lisb to be fratulul' nt. 

Tuttle's Elixir 

is of such well known and high quality 
that it does not need to bring am thing 
but honest statements to its defense. 
Indispentible for all veterinary uses. 

Tuttle's Family Elixir £ ^ mSui 



[>lo fico fur 6c in 

Send at one* for oar 100-pace book "Veter- 
inary Experience," which we mail free. 
Tottk'ftElUlrC«.,4J70'Farrcll l. .Sin F rancltcn.i il 



• |Vw&r*> I f ■ 



•>*<M> c* tttt -r t tit 



,f 1 



NEW MODEL 
1903 




BEST ROAD CART MADE, 

O'BRIEN & SONS 

Cor. Golden (late Ave. and Folk St. 
BAM VH v MtilSCO, cal 




Ask your 
Dealer 




lake your 
horses happy by pro 
viding them with 

Pure-Salt Bricks? 

Warranted to contain 
nothing but refined dairy 
salt. A great modern conve 
niencc at a cost of about 5 cents 

per horse per ) 

•TV 



Belmont 
Stable Supply CI 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 



PERCHERON STALLIONS FOR SALE. 

■j'WOSIX YEARS OLD, TWO THREE YEARS 
old and two two years old Three blacks and 
three grays. Four of them registered. Full ped 
gre-.,given. Apply to .'. A. BIAXL, 

Laton. Fresno Co, Cal. 



A. H. ANDERSON 

Live Stock Auctioneer 

and General Auollon Business, Real Estate, eto 
Half, Meld In Any P» rt of the State. 

Correspondence solicited. 

19 Turk St., San Francisco. m , ;!;;t;,.. 

■ lirancb — 1 101 J Street. Sacramento 



CALIhOKNIA 



Photo Engraving Company 



*Oil 

No racing stable should he 
without the greatest of all horse 
liniments. Cures Rheumatism. 
Sprains, Cuts, Bruisej, Cramps. 
Colic Stiffness, Soreness, Aches 
and Pains. A single trial will 
prove all we could say. 



All Druggists and Harness 
Dealers or Vita Oil Co., 
1533 Buchanan St 
San Francisco, Cal. 

J. A. McKerron and J. O'Kane. Agts. 

R A cTn G 

safe 



Mil. II ( I \ss ART 

IK 



Half 



Tones and Une Rmjraving 

Artlsllo Designing. 
1«>H Mission St .. cot. flm . Hun rrtnrlirn 



Every Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE. 

New California Jockey Club 
INGLESIDE TRACK 

SIX OR MORE RACES DAILY 

RACES START AT % V. M. SHARP. 

Reached by street cars from any part of the 
elty. 

Train leaves Third and Townsend at MS P m . 
and leaves the track Immediately after the laat 

race. 

THOMAS H WILLIAMS, Trepidant. 
mOI W. TK EAT, Secretary. 

FOR SALE. 

Three Standard-Bred Trotting Stallions 

WII.KFS STOCK 

One Seal Brown, lfl bands, fcaled May 1 189S; 

first dam Fearless by Fallls 4781 (record 2:33); 

second dam Jean Perault hv Signal .WT 
One Golden Itay, is | hands, foaled March 5, 1898; 

first dam Signal by Del Sur WW (reeord fcM), 

dam of Ouy Line 2:2WV second dam Lady Sin 

nal by Signal 3327. 
One llrown, white points, IS I bands, foaled April 

1808: full brother to the bay. 
These colt* are all sired by Prince Alrlec rsms, 
son of Ouy Wilkes 2807 (record <:ISu >, and bred by 
Wm. Corbltt, gan Mateo, Cal They are pure 
galled and show wonderful speed for the little 
work they have done. 
For further particulars apply to 

r H McFVOl . Menlo Park, Cad. 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Irancisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
•nerclal school oa the Pacific Coast 2O.000 gradu 
»te* 30 leaobera: 70 typewii tera: over SOD students 
annually plaoed la positions Rend for catalogue. 

«. P. IIFALO. ITMiMont. 



CURfsS, SPLINTS, SPAVINS, WIN DPI ITS, 

—and nil rnlarK'' T| " 'ill nb«olulrly rnnorfd l v — 

quiimin's 
Ointment. 

It hat Ihr u*inuntiflrtt rndortrmrnt nf our lead? 
ing httrxrmcn and vrtrrintiriant. 

Mr. <"*. K. Hi* r tt « nT, 0ttk$m Rt**» Bnnk, 
H\myV*n t Minn , n*j*: 
**On« botfl I" OWN ft w «*ry t>*rl chmm of blnod npftvln 
on * m»f* for which I hftvo ftinc*» hmm on>r*>'1 BM. 
I woold not h* wiMiont it If It cottt $/> fji • ,Kittl«.' r 
M> har* h t'tr*rt» nf »ur n testimonial*. 

ftl.OO prr pnrUiir. A«k roar UrnggM for It. If 
e»*»« oat k«tp It, mm w\l\m*nii ttrnpfti'l OH r.T#-Ji>t of pru *\ 

. - • i . k\ ii t inn a hi , whlul S ^ 

1 h^^^^T^r^s^V^i^^rv^r^r^ 




12 



3£ft£ $r££t»cr nub Qporizman 



[January 30, 1*4 



Horse Feeding. 



By Dr. H. A. Spencer of San Jose at the Unlver" 
slty Farmers' Institute at Pasadena. 
1 have selected for my theme "Feeding 
and Care of Stock," meaning to discuss 
the most advantageous methods of feeding 
and caring for stock, both from an eco- 
nomic and sanitary point of view, and my 
remarks will more particularly apply to 
horses. 

In no branch of veterinary science is it 
more important to possess an accurate 
knowledge of the conditions which are 
present in a state of health, as well as 
disease, than in the care and treatment of 
the teeth. It is always by a thorough 
knowledge of the appearance of an organ 
during health that we are enabled to dis- 
tinguish any deviation from that condition. 

The Horse's Teeth— Horses of all ages 
suffer more or less from long, sharp and 
projecting points which are found on the 
molar teeth. They are located on the in- 
side of lower and outside of the upper 
grinders, and occasionally also on the in- 
side of the upper ones; they vary in size 
and shape, some being small and blunt, 
while others are long, thin and very sharp. 
The injuries they inflict are lacerations of 
the cheeks and tongue, and a limitation 
of the lateral motion of the jaws, unless 
this motion is extensive enough to permit 
the whole crown of the tooth to come in 
contact with the food to be ground, much 
of it will not be reduced to a proper con- 
sistency. Other difficulties also arise, 
such as decay, ulceration and malforma- 
tion. 

Having thus briefly accounted some of 
the difficulties to be overcome before we 
can reasonably expect food to be of the 
most benefit, it would seem superfluous to 
caution you as to who should be employed 
to rectify the defects. Doubtless many of 
your number are painlully reminded that 
the country is overrun with a class of 
people who designate themselves veter- 
inary dentists. l'038iblv, however, you 
are not aware of the fact that there is not 
in the world a place of instruction where 
veterinary dentistry is taught, if we ex- 
cept the veterinary colleges, where it 
forms a part of the curriculum, and is 
never given as a sole study. 

As well set a hod carrier to mend a 
piano or a typewriter as to expect a per- 
son unfamiliar with anatomy and physi- 
ology to correct the irregularities of so 
delicate a structure as the mouth. 

A horse should be fed with reference to 
what he is to do. The horse doing slow 
but hard and exhausting labor, should be 
generously fed on grain three times a day, 
with as much clean, sweet hay at night as 
he will entirely consume, bearing in mind 
that the hay in this country, unlike the 
grass product of the prairie states, is rich 
in grain, therefore much more nutritious, 
and a less quantity is requisite to satisfy 
a natural appetite. There is an inclina- 
tion on the part of most horse owners and 
hired help to feed vastly more hay than 
is required, under the mistaken idea that 
they are being generous to the stock ; but 
horses, if they are permitted to do so, will 
develop abnormal appetites, besides often 
wasting more than they will consume. 
We have Been that the stomach of that 
animal is relatively smaller than that of 
most other aniinalB. This being the case, 
it is obvious that if permitted the horse 
will, even after filling it to repletion, and 
distending it to an extent that materially 
limits muscular contraction, continue to 
force more into it, thus compelling the 
pyloric orifice to open for the passage of 
aliment only partially prepared for future 
adaptation and final assimilation. In 
addition to this, the distention of the 
stomach limits by pressure the action of 
the- lungs, thereby curtailing a proper 
amount of oxygen being absorbed for the 
clarification of the blood, besideB causing 
a retention of poisonous carbonic acid gas 
in the system. Neither should a horse 
be permitted to drink immediately after 
feeding, as by this course the stomach is 
filled with a fluid that dilutes the saliva, 
gastric and other digestive fluids, and 



washes the contents of the stomach into 
the intestines, producing looseness and 
scouring; while on the contrary if com- 
pelled to take of water I efore feeding, he 
has no abnormal thirst, and takes only 
such quantities as is necessary to give 
proper fluidity to the t'.ssues of the body. 

Under the subject of hay we have in 
this country four principal varieties, viz: 
Wheat, barley, oat and alfalfa. Of these 
I am constrained to believe that the for- 
mer, if well cured and clean, is by far the 
most suitable for horses used exclusively 
for draft purposes. It is rich in fat-pro- 
ducing qualities, and while succulent and 
wholesome, if cured careful'y, and not too 
green, seems to assimilate nicely, but the 
consumption of it by driving horses does 
not seem fruitful of a condition of fitness 
for road purposes, as does that of either 
oat or barley hay. Oat hay of a good 
character appears to te the most satis- 
factory provender we possess for road 
horses; the chief objections to barley hay 
is the annoyance that the beards produce 
in making the mouth sore, and that it is 
so rich in fibrin-producing elements, that 
some individuals become afflicted with 
skin affections which prove very refrac- 
tory and troublesome. Alfalfa hay, I 
think, is of more value for broodmares, 
colts and unused horses than for other 
purposes. It has good milk and fat- 
producing qualities. 

How to Save — Economy sometimes 
dictates a carefulness akin to stinginess 
in feeding. In cases where one's finances 
compelextreniecaution.it were best to 
expend what money we have to spare for 
the best products we can procure, and 
then cut and moisten the hay, which, by 
the addition of a little bran and middlings 
well stirred, makes a cheap, effective 
food, a measurably small quantity of 
which, fed fresh and unfermented, makes 
strength and satisfies the appetite; but 
some uncut hay should be used in con- 
junction, however, very materially less 
than if the cut mass had not been 
administered. By this mode of procedure, 
from one-third to one-fourth of the 
ordinary expenses of the "keep'' of the 
animals may be saved, and their health 
remain unimpaired. 

Of grain 1 should say that for driving 
horses, oats are by far the most satis- 
factory. They seem to have the needed 
material for bone and muscle building i 
and do not produce excessive fat, which, 
in a gentleman's driver, renders him 
loggy, disspirited and easy to fatigue. 

Barley is admissible in the winter 
months where fat and its consequent 
warmth is desirable, but under any cir 
cumstances during enforced idleness and 
over Sunday, both hay and grain Bhould 
be materially reduced. In fact, it were 
better if the latter were taken away en- 
tirely, and a well made mash of bran 
substituted. 

By observing these last instructions 
you will undoubtedly save your horses 
many an attact of colic, azoturia, lym- 
phangitis and other complaints that are 
frequently fatal and always call for the 
expense attending the visit of a veter- 
inarian, to say nothing of the drugs and 
nostrums you may administer. 

It becomes more manifest to me every 
year that we feed our stock more hay 
than they require to keep them in a con- 
dition of health and fettle commensurate 
with their comfort and our requirements, 
and while it is impossible to lay down 
any rule that will apply collectively to 
the horse family, I am led to believe that 
the ordinary horse that consumes more 
than fifteen pounds of hay, at either one 
or two meals in twenty four hours, is eat- 
ing and destroying more than is good for 
either him or his owner. 



WALDi 



AMrlrh, Mo., Dee., 12,1002. 
Dr. B. J. KrD'Ult Co., 

Owilm ,,. i h» T<1 rprVn hipMj- of 
your ncllrit** In thi* ncl c hborhood. I 
think you, Kendall'* Sr*Tln Cure It «i 
eelUnL 1 highli/ rtcommtn-l it whir- 
•vir 1(10. I -■ 1 I : I % two 

0«nt itfttnp f..r wMeh plrwn arm] re* 
Jour honk "A Trr*ttie no th* fWie and 
fall DtwuM." Yaui-I trulv. 

C. H. JOHNSON. 



CURE 



' Dulwlek mil. Pt-W.N. 8. W., auarrtlt*. 
132 New C»ot«rhiirj L a i. Oct. 2f "~" 
Dr. 0. J. I - . ■ r ■ i 1 

Oentlomen: — Will you kindly lend me DM 
of your ••Tr*»ti»e nn the fWe tort hit !>!•• 
m - -' ' 1 hm*« uied your KrndftU'i > i mrin 
Cure, itid I can tafely nty It 1 1 the b»t that 
I b»va ever h*d, ami I n ■ . . - 1 : Ittoothar 
bone trtlncra. V«ry truly youn. 

HARRY SMITO 



Is Known the World Over 

ns being th(>oli]pst ami only really reliable cure for Spavins, Ringbone, Splints, Curbs 

and all other forms of Lameness. It has met with the unqualified endorsement of 
horsemen everywhere, in all localities and under all conditions. It never fails, but cures 
quickly and permanently. 

In addition to being the best stable remedy known, it is unequalled as a liniment for 
household and family use. Sold generally bv all druggists. Price ?1; six bottles for $5. 
We send valuable book, "A Treatise on (be Horse," profusely illustrated, free upon request. 



Winner .i 



DR. B. J. KENDALL CO., 

Enosburg Falls, Vermont. 



V KKNW tX^\^ 



Speed, Breeding and Individuality 



In England a man by the name of Tis- 
dall bought twelve of the best heifers that 
he could get and continued to breed from 
the best for twenty years. The average 
yield of milk the first year was 8648 
pounds, and the tenth year it was 4800, 
and the twentieth year it was 6944 pounds. 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



RITA H. 2:11 1-4 

Pacing Mare by McKinney 2:11 1-4 

ELECTRO McKINNEY 

Brown Colt, Four-Year-Old Trotter by McKinney 2:11 1-4 

RITA H. is a dark brown mare who stands nearly 16 hands high, and will weigh In raolng trim 
about I05<i lbs This mare has had this year a very remarkable record. She started In the North- 
western Circuit in the States of Oregon and Washington, and out of eight starts won her first seven 
races and only lost four heats during the entire circuit, and has a pacing record of 3:11 H- The mare 
is five years old and Is excellent on the road She does not pull or lug, and a lady can drive her 
anywhere. Last spring she trotted a workout mile in and repeated in 3:Ki : i after only seven 

weeks' work. Her owner has driven her in 2:124 In the Los Angeles Driving Club races, she having 
won all of them in which she started. This mare can step two heats below 8:10. 

ELECTRO McKINNEY Is a brown stallion foaled in 1900, and stands IS bands 1 inch in height. 
He trotted a full mile as a two-year-old in 2:31^, last quarter in 35 seconds, and when a three-year- 
old a full mile in 2:21 (4, last quarter in 32 seconds. He is perfectly galted and a grand individual in 
every respect. Weighs about 950 lbs. ELECTRO McKINNEY is bred in the purple, and Is one of 
the best sons of MoKtnney alive to day McKinney is undoubtedly the greatest sire for his age, 
living or dead. ELECTRO McKINNEY was not raced last year, being only a three-year-old and 
not entered In any stakes it was decided to hold him over. 

These horses are all r ! ght and there is not a thing the matter with them, but my business 
demands are suoh that I cannot aSord to devote any time to racing them. For prices and further 
particulars address 

BYRON ERKEN BRECH ER, 

301 CI RRIER BUILDING, LOS ANGELES, CAL, 
Or Inquire at Office of BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



M ty* Registered Trade Mark W 

^ SPAVIN CURE x 



I. W B0 DSL VALK, lM.R\S\NrM%* 
PLEASANTUX HOI* COMPANY " 
RANCno DE LOMA, I.IVKKMnRE 
VINA I>E LOMITAf*. I.I V Kit Molt K 

U. A. D.W'ls. Manager 

PLEASANTON. 



Telephone Rlaek 76. 



LILIENTHAL Sc CO, 

He ale and Mission Sts. 
San FranHsen, Cal. 



Troy Chnniinl Co.. Tn>y. N. Y. Plensanton, Cal.. Oft. 20. 1W3. 

In rcjrard to "Savf-thc-Horsf*' I have uwtl it with much success. The running horse •■Oil. Kosf-vrlt" that 
bad broken down in t mini lip for two or three years finst is now in (rood shape anil will certainly lie able to 
nice as well as ever In* tore. Have also usc«i ' Save-thc IIorse" mi the horse "( Jreyfeld'* with satisfactory re- 
sults. Will also add that I luivcseen "Save-the Horse" remove a deep sealed rinpbone from a Director trotting 
horse in Monroe Salisbury's Stable. I am pleaded to he able to recommend "Save tlie-IIoi-sc" from actual 
experience. Yours truly 

GEO. A. DAVIS. 



ShelbyviMe. Tenn.. Jan. 2. 1001 
I enclose P. O. Order for live Dollaix, for which send 
me bOttle of "Save-the-Horse". The Anl bottfe has 
saved me the worth of at lea-st one hOfMi 

J. A. HA Kit KIT. 



Columbus Orove. Ohio. Dec. 21. IMS. 
One-third of a bottle of ' Save I ln-1 Ioinc" cured my 
bone "f a spavin that had been tired and blistered 
several times in the post two years. 

M. M. OSROItX. 



On broken down, weak and injured tendons, ruptui 
permanently cures all broken down conditions of the ankle 

loss of hair. No man need hi- horse stiller and l». ne 

AND I'KKM ANKNTI.Y CTKKS HONK AND HOi; SPAVIN*. 
Cl'HH, SPLINT, CAPPKD HOCK. WINDPP Kl\ SHOE HOI 
LAMKNKKH. Apply in all extremes of weather. Horses ma 
1 1 o 1 1 1 desl ruction of hair or scalding of limb. 

$5.00 a bottle. Written guarantee with every bottle. Constructed solely to prttOCt TOO 
Nit d "1 second bottle improbable, t-xcept in no est cases, o.py of booklet and guarantee sent upon application. 

am paid Da 



I litruinents and all strain" its power is unfailing- 
lioi-k tendons or ligaments without scar, blemish or 
iranacmted. "S A VK-T1 II -IK >I<SK" POSITIVELY 

HOROUGBFTN, RING HONE (except low ringbone) 

.. WK\K AND SPKAINKD TKNDi >NS AND ALL 
WOffc as usual with boots, as no harm can result 



bj TROY CHEMICAL CO., TROY, N.Y 
E NEWELL, 519 Mission St.. San Francisco, Cal., Pacific Coast Agent 

A Sidney Stallion With Earning Capacity 



In pursuance of my intention to retire from the business of breeding horsep, 
and having 1 disposed of all my broodmares at auction, I now offer at private sale 
the stallion 

William Harold 2:i3i-4. 

His sire is the great Sidney 2;19j, grandeire of the champion trotter of the 
world, Lou Dillon 1:58*, and his dam the great race and broodmare Cricket 2:10 
(dam of four in the list) by Steinway, the greatest son of Strathmore. 

WILLIAM HAROLD is a producer The only two of his get to start are 
that wonderfully fast trotter Janice 2:08} and the pa^er Dan Burns 2:15. 
WILLIAM HAROLD'S services in the stud were very limited up to three years 
ago, as he was raced. His weanlings, yearlings and two-year-olds are very prom- 
ising and have size, good looks and great natural speed, besides being uniform in 
color, nearly all bays. He is a sure foal getter, is in the very best condition, sound 
and healthy, and with ordinary good business management can earn in the stud 
in 1904 the price asked for him. 

For tabulated pedigree and full particulars, address 

H. W. MEEK, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



January 30, 1904] 



13 



McMURRAY 



T 



JOG CART 

Especially adapted for 
Jouginp;, Training ard 
Matinee Driving'. 

Price Low. 

McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

StnnilMrtI the World O.rr 

•^Address for printed matter and prices 

W. J. Kenney, 

r>3l Vulencli* st , N»n Francisco, Cat. 



THE CHAMPION SIRE OF EARLY AND EXTREME SPEED 



NUTWOOD WILKES. 



iia( i- Menu ii 

Bj (.1 N Wll hi ' 

Dim i.l ii \ \\ 
n> m r\» i Mm 




S:I«', 

. . »:IHv» 
»:IM>, 

He l« tbe only Stallion that over produced t wo three year-old* In on* season with 
records of tt>S and respectively. Who te It. ox champion three-year-old 

RrMlnR of the world, reduced hla record to iMO^ .l.-lin \ McKerron V:04', ffctSM 
as a three- rear-old) I* (he fastest (roller ot all tbe famoui tribe of Grorge Wilkes 
NUTWDOli Mil KES wilt make lb" Beaton of IllfM at tbe 

NUTWOOD STOCK l : ARM. from Feb. 1st to July 1st 



Fee = $50 



l-tir lli«' **i i.ni 



With return prlvllcgee If 
horse remain* my properly 
Good pasturage at M per 
month. Bills payable be- 
fore removal of mare 
Slock well eared for. but 
no responsibility assumed 
for accldenta and escapes 



Nutwood Wilkes 22116 



IS Till HII4B ■ F 



John A McKerron 



t:04H 

Jf 



FOR SALE. 
THOROUGHBRED YEARLING COLTS 

Hyrni CAT. out of Btrtagbred Mares 

....ALSO 

TROTTING BRED 

YOUNG STALLIONS AND FILLIES 

TKOTTKKS AND PAOUI, 
THE SIRES OF THESE COLTS ARE DIAHLO. 

NutwooC Wilkes, Monbslls, Cupid and Sidney 
Dillon. Tbe sires of their first, second and third 
dams are Guy Wilkes, Hock Wilkes, Director. 
Harold, Electioneer, Cornelius. Paul's Abdallah, 
Venture. Lodl and St. Clair. All of these sires 
trace in tbe male line to Hamhlet-nlan 10 th ough 
bis b?st producing male descendants, excepting 
tbe thoroughbreds Venture and Lodl and the 
pacer St. Clair. 

C. E FARNUM, U. D. 
306 Parrott Building. 



of l« 
3-09) a 



1. is by a son i Nun 
re out of his daugb 



st »: 
ters 



*yeer old race rcc »:l*t< 

Who I.. It t: Hit, 

i war old raco roc.fclJ 

Stanton Wilkes IKIIH4 

Georgle B *m< 

Claudius £1.114 

Tidal Wave »:l.lv< 

Bob Ingersoll 2:M\ 

Irvlngton Boy 2: 1 7*2 

trandsons and granddauu liters of NUTWOOD WILKES over started In races. Of these, Alono KK>>4, fastest four year old 
MS), and Caroline L. (t) *:IS»4\ Hollo 8:15 and Miss Ooirgle t:H (second to Ben F. In S: 10 and timed, scpariitely. In raco In 
Voting; stock by Nutwood Wilkes for snle. For further particulars apply or address 



Verona 


..»!«»< 


Irvlngton BeHe 


i 1*', 


Echoni Wilkes 


.. fclBS 




»:» 


Rosewood 


. »:«l 


Central Girl 


< »>4 


Nearest 


. »:«'* 


Little Branch (3).. 




Frank Irvlngton. . 




Mixer 




Allx B 


a-.ai 



and 8 more In tbe list. 



McKinney Mare For Sale. 

sjOLID BAY MARE WITH BLACK POINTS: 
' 8 years old: sired by McKinney 2:IU<. dam by 
Sidney, second dam a producing mare by Chief- 
tain. This mare with little training bas worked 
miles in S-.ii% quarters In 32% and eighths In 16 
seconds. Sr e is now in foal to Monterey. James 
Berryman and Grant Lapbam both declare that 
she Is one of the most promising prospects they 
have ev*r seen. She Is absolutely sound, kind 
and gentle, and will be driven for speed for the 
benefit of prospective purchasers. Entered In 
Breeders MOOT) Futurity Stake for foals of IIKM. 
Address EDWARD NEWLAND3. 1679 Webster 
Street, between 23d and 31th streets, Oakland. 
Telephone: Cedar 701. 



FOR SALE. 



\IV ENTIRE STOCK OF STANDARD-BRED 
•«* Trotting and Pacing Horses Single drivers 
and donble teams. Some excellent prospects for 
stake winners entered In tbe Occident. Stanford 
and Breeders Futurity stakes. Tbe great brood 
mare Daisy S. (dam of Tom Smith 2:I3'<\ General 
Vallejo 2:*)%. Sweet Rose 2:28 (trial 2:21) and 
Little Mac (3) 2:27 1 The driving horses and colts 
can be seen at my stable In Vallejo, and tbe 
broodmares, etc . at tbe race track. Apply to or 
address THOMAS SMITH, Vallejo. Cal. 



ROSE DALE STOCK FARM 

SANTA ROSA, CAL. 
Home of Daly 2:1.%, Wnsblngton Mc- 
Kinney and St. Whips 2:31, 

bas for SALE some broodmares, yearlings, by 
Washington McKinney. Good prospects for 1904 
and roadsters 



JOHN H. DOWNEY 
Practical Horse Trainer 

ALAMEDA RACE TRACK, a\ LAMBDA, 
Will take horses to break or train for road or 
track. Best of references Has had twenty-five 
years' experience Four years with DuRolsBros , 
Colorado. One year at Palo Alto Farm Apply 
to or address JOHN H. DOWNEY, Alameda Race 
Track, Alameda. California 



J. W. Zibbell's Training Stables 

Corner Point I.obos Road and 20th Avenue 
San Francisco. 

XJORSES TRAINED FOR TRACK OR ROAD 
11 and satisfaction guaranteed Terms reason 
able Horses bonght and sold. 'Phone Pine 1781 




MARTIN CARTER. Nutwood Stock Farm. Irvington. Alameda Co.. Cal. 



SEARCHLIGHT 2:03} 



No. 33657. 



The Greatest Race Horse and the Fastest Stallion that was ever 
Owned or Stood for Public Service in California. 



FEE $75 FOR THE SEASON 



WITH HKTI UN 
PHI \ I I.K.GK 



AND 



Reg. No. 
25885 



LECCO 2:091 

One of the Handsomest, Fastest and Best Bred Stallions on tbe Pacific Coast. 
Has trotted a half in 1:00$. The onl> Stallion in tho world whose dam 
has produced two trotters with reco.'ds better than 2:10. 

FEE S50 FOR THE SEASON, with Return Privilege, 

These two great Stallions will make the Season of 11)01, February 1st to July 1st, at the 

PLEA.SANTON RACE TRACK. 

Best care g ven to mares. For terms, description, tabulated pedigrees, summarios of races of 
both horses and any other Information address 

ED MILLS, Pleasanton, Cal. 



BONNIE DIRECT 2:051-4 

Will serve a limited number of approved mares during the season of 1004. 
Fee $100 for the season. The owners of BONNIE DIRECT have at the 
Pleasanton Track throe two-year-olds from his first crop of colti, and three 
yearlings. These can be seen at any time. 

BONNIE STEINWAY, 4 Y.o. 

By STEINWAY 2:25J, dam BON BON-2:26 (dam of Bonnio Direct 2:05}, 
etc.), will serve a few mares during the season of 1901 at $2."> for the season 

MareB bred to either horse not proving to be with foal can bo returned in 1905 
free of charge, or service fee refunded, at option of owner of mare. Best of care 
taken of mares, but no responsibility assumed. 

Full pedigree of either or both Stallions mailed on application. 

C L. GRIFFITH, Pleasanton, Cal. 



TALES OF THE TURF 

7I<S Pages of Horse. 

Two Volumes of 

FACTS -FICTION -FUN 

Vol. I.— FASIGS Contains .7 stories written 
by William B. Faski, and a Memoir. 114 
pages. Cloth. 

\><l : 111 I *> i >• DATS, provides samples of 
racing from the Grand Circuit to tho bushes, 
a peep at the gallopers and quarter horses, and 
tbe horse trader. Illustrated by Whitney 404 
pages. Cloth 
Price of each volume, oo, or the two (none 

order, 93 AO, all charges prepaid. Address 

Breeder and Sportsman, 

30 8—1 J St. SAN FRANCISCO Cal. 

An Inflamed Tendon 

needs Cooling. 

Absorbine 

Will do it and restore the 
circulation. No blister; no 
hair gone; and you can use 
the horse, £2.oo per bot- 
tle. Regular dealers, or 
W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F.. 

Sprlng-flrld, Mum 

For sale by Mack.* Co.. LangleyUt Michaels Co , 
Redington * Co , J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco. 

VETERINARY. 



ARNER 31300 

TRIAL 2:15 I II' 2:12 |«2 

Sire CHARLES liF.lt It v U:«0 (sire of Don Derby *:0IH, p,| I afiprlv ?-lf» 1.7 

Much Better 3: 77*. Derby Princess 3 <*<4. Diablo *- u t-ailCI iy &.IU I L 

2:0»'t. 1 3 In I :tt list. ■ In i .in list. Leading sire of Owvhn ?•?? I.i 

new 2:20 performers In 1803. VYYJaWJ L.LL I * 

Dam ItKKTHA by Alcantara 7S9. and others. 

Season of lliol, February loth lo .Inly 1st, 

AT SAN LORENZO, CAL. 

P tJZ FOB rill". SI'.AS IK, payable at ond of season, or •:il> to Insure, payable when mare 
ret JlLO proves In foal, providing ownership of mare remains tho same. I'sual return privilege. 
Good pasturage 1.1 per month, and best of care taken of mares. For further particulars address 

C. A. BRANIN, San Lorenzo. Cal. 




DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Turin 

Infirmary AMD REflimnca -81 1 Howard St: 
between Fourth and Fifth St*., San Franclsoo. 
Telephone: Main 467. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Rose* Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: MA Golden Gate Avenue, Saa 
Franclsoo. Cal Telephone South 461. 

Dr. Wm, r*. IDgan. 

M. R. C. V. 8.. F. X. T. M. I. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of tbe Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons. England: Fellow of the Edlnbur* 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduateof tbe New 
Veterinary College F.dlnburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F Fire Department; Live Siook 
Inspecior forNew Zealand and AustrallanColoalei 
at the p»n of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Kx President ot 
tbe California Stat* Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion. Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Offlae, 
San Franclsoo Vaterlnary Hospital, 1117 Goldea 
Gat* Avenue, near Webater St., San Franclsoo 
X^lepbon* West lit. 

BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



Pedigrees Tabulated ^J7J^'^~A 

Sportsman, U G«»ry itre*t, San Franolaeo, Cal. 



HOI. STEINS Winner* of sverr 7 days' butt*r 
ronfst at State Fair 1899 1st k Sd for aged cows, 
4 yr , * yr and t-yr -olds; II Jersey* and Durham* 
competing, tth year my Holstefns have beaten 
Jerseys for butter Stock for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burin, K Montgomery St., 8. F. 

JERSEYS, UUTIDn AND 111 ItH AMS. 
Dairy Stock specially Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished IR78 William Nile* at Co. Los Angeles, 

OaL 

A Y RH li l HKJt Yonng Italia. Oows and Heifers 
Registered. From prise winning families. Brown 
A flrandon Pdaluma Cal. 



©he gveebcv cmi» &pcrvt&txnxn 



[jANtAKY 30, 1904 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 

Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney-Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEALY, Manager. 




Oictatus Medium 32493 



Will make tbe coming season at 



Race Track, Hollister, Cal, 



Jog Sanchez In charge 

$40 FOR THE SEASON. 

Payable at time of service, with usual return privilege 
Every care taken to prevent aocidents, but no responsibil- 
ity should any occur Prompt and careful attention in all 
cases Pasturage furnished to mares sent from a distance 
at $2 50 a month. 

A DICTATES MEDIUM l'I KSE OF SIOO. 
I will give a purse of $101), with entrance money added 
for a race, best two in three, open to any and all colts from 
DICTATUS MEDIUM, the result of the breeding season of liXM, either pacers or trotters Must be 
three to start and race to come off on Hollister track. Fair week, 1907 (Exact date to be hereaftei 
announced ) $ft entrance money, payable June I, 1905. $5 thirty days before the race. Three 
moneys: 60 per cent to lirst horse; 30 per cent to second and 10 per cent to third. For further par- 
ticulars, address «• LATHKOP, Hollister. 

DESCRIPTION. 

DICTATUS MEDIUM is 6 years old, weighs 1220 pounds. A beautiful turned bay horse with 
heavy mane and tail kind and gentle, with a perfect disposition. Good flat heavy bone. He has 
great power and speed. Has a record of 2:24, but has worked out in 2:12. He is a horse that will go 
out any day and do his best. His colts are models of grace and beauty. Only one so far has been 
worked. Thisone, Al Willson's yearling LITTLE MEDIUM, paced an exhibition X mile on tbe 
Hollister Race Track in 38'4 seconds, a 2:33 gait. This colt has great promise. 

DICTATUS MEDIUM is by Dlctatus 2:17 one of the best bred and fastest horses ever brought to 
California. The dam of Dlctatus Medium is Helle Medium (dam of Stam B. 2:1IW), by Happy 
Medium, grandstre of the dam of Lou Dillon l:58V4 His second dam Is Argenta by Almont Light- 
ning, slreof the dam of Zombro 2:11. There is no doubt but Dictatus Medium will prove to be a sire 
of speed as well as good size, style and disposition. 



BAYSWATER WILKES 2:251 

Sire of KELLY IIKIGGS 



Son 



Sable Wilkes 2:18 

n nil 

Fanny Bayswater 

Dam of 2 in 2:30 



WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1D04 AT 



WOODLAND, CAL. 



Fee $40. 

BAYSWATER WILKES Is a sire of speed, size, good looks, soundness and gameness. Every 
one of his produce that has been trained can show standard speed. His sire, Sable Wilkes, also sired 
Nushagak.sire of Aristo, winner of the Occident and Stanford stakes. His dam, Fanny Bayswater, 
is the dam of Senator L., holder of the champion four-mile trotting record of 10:12. 

Breed to BAYSWATER WILKES and you will get oolts that will sell at good prices. 

For cards containing full Pedigree and all particulars address 

S. H. HOY, Winters, Cal. 

SIDNEY DILLON 23157 

a , ./LOU DILLON 1:584 (the Fastest Trotter and Greatest Record Breaker In the world), 
Sire °f{ o uy Dillon 2:06% (the fastest mare of 1901), B. S Dillon 2:16V< and Captivity 2:28V4. 

SANTA ROSA STOCK FARM 

SANTA KOSA, CAL. 

SIDNEY DILLON was sired by Sidney 
2-.I9K: dam Venus (dam of Adonis 2:11H, 
Leah 2:24<4, Cupid 2:18 and Juno, tbe dam of 
Mercury 2:21 and Ida 2:30) by Venture 2:27!<. 
aire of dam of Directum 2:05^ SIDNEY 
DILLON is a model of symmetry and im- 
parts his grand individuality, tnberentspeed 
and excellent disposition to all his progeny. 

Terms for the Season, $100. 

Only a limited number of approved mares 
taken. Usual return privilege. In case horse 
la sold service fee will be returned if mares 
have not proven in foal. Season ends July 
1, I901. Pasturage $1 per month. Best of 
care taken of mares, but no responsibility 
assumed for accidents or escapes. For par- 
ticulars regarding shipment ot mares, etc , 
address frank turner, 

Supt. Santa Rosa Stocx Farm. 

Santa Rosa, Cal. 
Or IRA PIERCE, 728 Montgomery St., S. F. 




THREE-YEAR-OLD 

2:15; 



No. 23444 

STAM B. 



FOUR-YEAR-OLD 
2:111 



A Colt Trotter Himself, and His Produce Perform Early, and the Blood of the Two- 
Mlnute Trotters. Futurity and Horse Show Winners can be found In his Veins. 

t\Je l se m ason From Feb. IS to June 1, 1904, at p LEAS A N TO N 

AFTER THAT DATE (by request) AT SALEM, OR. 

At 840 the Season, or 860 to insure. 

For further particulars address SAMUEL UAMBLE, Pleasanton Cal. 

" Or TITTLE BROS , Rocklln, Cal. 



Fast Paeer For Sale. 

THE PACING GELDING, AL SANDY 8:10^ 
by Wayland W., dam Rapid Ann by Overland. 
Can pace three heata better than 2:17. Can brush 
very fast on the road. Ezoellent prospect to race. 
He is one of the best road horses In the city 
Gentle and intelligent. Safe for lady to drive. 
For prloe and further particulars "address S. 
WATSON, 235 Douglas street, San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 

TJLACK TROTTING MARE, RECORD 2:18*; 
1 ' standard bred; sound; nearly if! bands high; 
weighs about 1100 pounds. Gentle and a high- 
class road mare Can be bought cheap. To see 
the mare and for particulars call or address 
Telephone: Pine 1788 J. W. ZIBBELL, 

345 Twentieth Ave., San Francisco. 



The Fastest Trotting Son of McKinney 

KINNEY LOU 2:072 

(Winner of Sll, *SO In 1003) Will Make the Season of 1904, Limited to One Dozen 

Approved Mares, at 

AGRICULTURAL PARK, SAN JOSE, Service Fee, $100. 

SEASON ENDS MAT 1, 1904. 

KINNEY LOU was one of the great race winners of 1903 on the Grand Circuit, and is a high-class 
race horse, game as a pebble and perfectly gatted. He is from race winning; and producing families 
on both sides, his dam. Mary Lou 2:17. being a great race mare and own sister to the well-known race 
horses Shylock 2:I5H and Ned Winslow 2:12J£. Mary Lou is by Tom Benton out of Brown Jenny (dam 
of 3 in list) by Dave Hill Jr . next dam by Black Hawk 766 Kinney Lou's oldest colts are two-year- 
olds and all have size, good color, and are natural trotters with good dispositions. 
For further particulars and card containing tabulated pedigree address 

BUOD DOBLE, 1030 PaclBc Ave. Alameda, Cal. 
or San Jose, Cal. 

NUTWOOD-DIRECTOR AND WILKES STALLION 



NEAREST 



Reg. No. 35562. Record 2:22 1-2. 



se i*9 8 o°4 n .° t Stables of T. W. Barstow 



Sire of ALONE 2:09^, champion 4 y. o of 1903 

(half mile :59!<), OCR LADY (trial 2:2054) 
and full brother to JOHN A. McKERKON '.' oi-. 
(the fastest trotter of tbe Wilkes family). 

near Race Track San Jose, Gal. 

By NUTWOOD WILKES 2:164, sire of John A. McKerron 2:01V4, Who Is It 2:10«, Stanton Wilkes 
2:I0H. Claudius 2:13J<, Georgie B. 2:12H, Bob Ingersoll 2:14*. Tidal Wave 2:13!4 and 21 other standard 

performers. 

Dam INGAR the greatest producing daughter of Director (dam of John A. McKerron 2M%, 
Nearest 2:224 and Thursday 2:21) by the old ohampion Director 2:17, sire of Directum MSU, Direct 
2:054, Direction 2:10K. etc ; second dam Annie Titus (d am of Annie C. 2:25) by Echo 462, sire of Echora 
2:234 (dam of Direct &05V&1 and 16 others in list: third dam Tiffany mare (dam of Gibraltar 2:224, 
sire of OurDick fclOJtf, Homestake SfcMM and others) by Owen Dale, son of Williamson's Belmont 

NEA REST is a dark bay. 15.3 hands and weighs 1200 pounds; well formed and of kind disposi- 
tion. In his blood lines are represented the greatest st rains of the American trotter. 

Tprmc tlfl for trip Cpouifl Usual return privilege. Excellent pasturage at $1 per 
■ Cl Ills, «tu lot lilt jcaauii. month No wire fenoes. Every precaution t aken to pre- 
vent accidents or escapes, but no liability assumed. All bills to be settled before mares are 

removed. For further particulars address 

Telephone: Red 1431 T. W. BARSTOW, San Jose, Cal. 



MONTEREY 2:09 1-4 



Reg. No. 
31706 



By SIDNEY (Grandslre of LOU DILLON 1:584) 
Dam HATTIE (also dam of MONTANA 2:16). 



WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1904 AT 



SAN LORENZO 



■ ATI KDAYS, BTJNDAT8, 
MONDAYS, TUESDAYS. 



MILPITAS 



WEDNESDAY'S. THl RS- 
DAYS and FRIDAYS 



Fp*» CSfl FOR THE SEASON 

rCC fldV m ares but no responsibility for accidents or escape: 



pedigree and full particulars Address 



Good pasturage at $3 per month. Best of care taken of 
Send for card containing 



P. J. WILLIAMS, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



If Your Horse Could Read 



IT WOULD PLEASE HIM 

TO SEE HIS NAME IN THE PAPER 
AT THIS TIME OF THE YEAR. 

Owners of good Mara9 are carefully considering the merits of the 
Stallions that are brought to their attention, and all have ideas in 
regard to what blood will nick beat to produce the result they most 
desire, and they all want Colts from well-known Sires. 

Keep Your Horse Before the Public 

No Matter How Good He Is 



PRINTER'S INK PAYS 

ADVERTISE HIM 

And Commence Early in the Season. 

We will Write Your Advertising Matter for You if you 
will give us the main points as to where he will stand, the 
price and a description of him. Get His Card in the 
paper and his Picture with a Write-up. It will do him good. 



STALLION SERVICE BOOKS, $1.00 
STALLION POSTERS 

STALLION FOLDERS 

STALLION CARDS 
PEDIGREES TABULATED, ETC., ETC. 

Breeder and Sportsman 

36 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



January 30, 1904] 



(The $veeltev and Qpovt& xnati 



15 



NEW "E. C." 

NEW "SCHULTZE" 
SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 

-«-'«- *> THE AMERICAN M E. C." and "8CHULTZE" Gunpowder Co., Ltd 

PHIL n BRKRART CO.. Paclfle Coast Representative I 

ALLISTITF 

The Standard Dense Powder of the World 

STILL LEADS AT THE TRAPS OR IN THE FIELD. 

Halllsttte wins from tbe limit marks In distance handicaps, at either live bird* or firing targets 
M it always gives the highest velocities with tho closest and moat oven patterns at all ranges 
Balllstite Is absolutely unvarying In results being waterproof, smokeless, odorless, without residue 
ressures lower than black powder, unaffected by ago or cllmatlo changes, and never pits, rusts or 
orrodes the barrels. Balllstite, is sold with above guarantee. 

Take No One's Word. Try It for Yourself. 

I H I All jl rn 75 CHAMBERS ST,, NEW YORK CITY 

Vi ■ II ■ LnU SM VVi Telephone 1747 Franklin 

Importers and Denier* In Kir* Arm*. Ammunition and |Mla] tioods. 

Sole Agents for THE REBLE GUN and HALLISTITE Dense) 
and EMPIRE Bulk SMOKELESS POWDERS. 

A postal brings catalogue and "Shooting Facts" (third edition) 

B ALLISTITF 
The Standard Dense Powder of the World. 



Du Pont Gun Powder 

SMOKELESS, SHOT GUN and 

MJXITAKY POWDBB 

Black Powder for Sporting and Blasting Purposes 
The Reputation of a Hnnilral Yean m tt» CtuanuitM of 

DU PONT POWDER 

»ll» Mission St.. Hooiu 311, Man Francisco. 1'al 



C A II \ i i . n l Aj 



SMITH GUNS 



WIN 

LONGEST 
STRAIGHT RUNS 




At H. F. Trap Hhootlnt; 
Association 
May »»-ta-«4-l5 
T1DORN, - - 7» Straights 
ritl PNKK, - 09 

Also longest straight run 
anil Orst monies at llvr t>lrits 




Loaded In O. IP. w . Smokeless. 
Winning* Hierhest Averasre at All Shoots. 



IF YOU WAS T THE BEST ASK FOR 



California Powder Works 

FACTORY LOADED SHELLS. 

If Yoar Dealer don't keep them write tbe 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS — Office 330 Market St., San Francisco 

Manufacturers of HERCCLF.S DYNAMITE, HERCULES OELATINE, CHAMPION 
IMI'KOVED BLASTING. BLACK BLASTING, BLACK SPORTING 
O. P. W. SMOKELESS and MILITARY SMOKELESS. 
Alio sell CAPS and FCSE. 



Parker Automatic Ejector 

The "Old Reliable's" Latest 

Attachment 



SMITH QUNS are made for 
All Kinds of Ammunition .. 




Catalog on 

application to 



Hunter Arms Co., Fulton, N. Y. 

PHIL. B. BEKEART CO.. San Francisco. Coast Representative 



SPRATTS PATENT. 



DOG 



CAKES 

REMEDIES 

SOAP. 



NEWARK, N. J. Send for free copy of " DOQ CULTURE." ST LOUIS, MO. 

Pacific Const Branch— 1324 Valencia Street, San Francisco. 

Agents for " S ANITAS " Disinfectant. 




HIGH-CLASS PUPPIES 

Especially some Fine YOIM. HITCHES 

By Imp LENZIE PRINCE (winner of 47 First 
Prizes). Imp. BRAEHEAD COMMANDER and 
Imp. RIPPOWAN ARCHER. 

StucU are Worker*, Prlr* Winner*), and slr«» wonderful 
workcru and prize winner* 

GLEN TANA FARM KENNELS Tmoa ^^ ma 

SPOKANE. WASH. 




Bend for Catalogue. 



New York Salesroom 
SI Warren St. 




COLLIES. 

The 
BEACH 
HILL 

Kennels 

955 
First St, 
San Jose 

CHAMPION HANOVER MONARCH 

(A. K. C. S. II. r>»98) by tbe great sire Ch 
Kllwyn Astrologer from Ch Old Hall Moon. 
Fee SIS. Pictures and Pedigree upon appllca 
tlon. High-class Puppies for sale. 




CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Adrtrtiirmtntt under thii htad on* crnt ptr irord 
per insertion. Ca*h to accompany ordrr. 



8T HF.KSAKI>B. 



AT 
Ml II 




AT STUD 

CUBA Of- KENWOOD 

(Olenbolgh Jr.-otellai 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II) 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

Ha M . IIOIX1K, Manager, 
link rr«flrld , Kf>rn Co., 

Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



PARKER BROS., Meriden, Conn 

HARNESS and SADDLES 

HIGH-CLASS 
FINISH AND 
WORKMANSHIP 
AT 

MODERATE 
PRICES, 

THE 

BIG STOKE 

JEPsSEN E3R^)^5 ^✓^J • INC. 1 55 57-59-61 Flrat Street, S. F 

1145-47 Market St. San Francisco I *«— •» «- ,w 



(^OCOANUT OIL CAKE 



THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PHIS 

FOR BAI.1 IW I.OTS. TO SUIT BY 

EL DORADO UNSEED OIL WORKS CO. 

ton California Htrset. Han Francisco, Cal. 



\T STUD— CHAMPION LE KING. GRAND- 
• » est headed St. Ilernard on the Coast. Fee ISO. 
W WALLACE, 58 Boyce St., San Francisco. 



IRISH A N II SCOTCH TKRRIF.R8. 

TR1SH AND SCOTCH TERRIER PUPPIES 
' at 112 and 115 Sired by Champion I.ojns 
Ruftlan and Champion Fighting Mao. MM. 

HItADl.F.V DYNE. Saturna P. O B.C. 



ROSE HOTEL 

PLEASANTON. CAL. 

Enlarged, Rebuilt Twenty live New Rooms 
Newly Furnished. Electric I it 1 "". 
Running Water Cp to date. 
A. ■. OI.NKY St SON - Proprietors 

Chronic Hrnnchltli and Catarrh ol Iht Bladder 

Cared In 4H Honrs. 



CAPSULES 



Hnperkir to Oopalbs. fobsbs or InJ.ntUs 



BLAKE, NOPFITT & TOWNE PEDIGREES TABULATED 



-mai.bhs is- 



And type written 
Ready U<t framing. 
Writ* tor prises. 

Mannam and Hrumm», H Oeary 8 (rest. 
San Fra n la— . Oal. 



16 



[Jancjar? 30 is<04 




ft 



U. M. C. AT SEA GIRT, 



ft 

ft 
ft 



ft 




the annual military shoot, won the Wim- 
bledon Cup, Capt. Richards, Ohio, score 
91=100. 

Troop A, of New York, won the 
Revolver Team Match, using U. M. C. 
.38 S. & W. special cartridges, score 849. 

Leech Cup Match, shot at 800, 900, 
and 1000 yards, was also won with 
U. M. C. .30=40 cartridges, by C. B. Winder, 
Ohio, score 94=105. 

T he Thomas Bullet 

now used in all U. M. C. .30 Government 
cartridges was used by practically every 
rifleman in eveiy match where Government- 
made ammunition was not required. These 
facts speak volumes for U. M. C. military 
and big game cartridges. 

U. M. C. .30-40 cartridge*) won the International 
Palma Trophy at Bisley, Knglmxl, against tha military 
n ili' teams of the world 




ft 

ft 
ft 



ft 
ft 



I he Union Metallic Cartridge Company 



Agency, 313 BROADWAY, 

NEW YORK CITY. 



Bridgeport. Conn. 



Depot, 86-88 FIRST ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

E. E. DRAKE, Mgr. 



**4hMmMHMMMMMHMMMM^^ 




REPEATING SHOT GUNS 

A CHANCE FOR A DOUBLE 

A QUESTION often asked about Repeating Shotguns if, "How quick can a second shot befired with 
them?" Shooters that have used Repeaters answer with one accord : "Doubles" are just as easy to 
make with a WINCHESTER REPEATING SHOTGUN as they are with a double barreled \\\UM 
gun. The third shot that a Winchester Repeater gives often bags a badly crippled bird which otherwise J\t 
would get away. Winchester Repeating Shotguns are made in "Take Down" styles in 12 and 16 gauge. 




Clabrough, Golcher & Go. 



RUNS 
Gun Goods 



*S-3end for Catalogue. 




FISHING 

Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 



FACTORY . . . 
LOADED . . 



SHELLS 



DU PONT 
" E. C." 
SGUUL.TZE 
HAZARD 



SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BALLISTITE 
LAFLIN Sc. RAND 
'INFALLIBLE 1 " 



What More do vou Want? 





A Close Finish In the Occident Stake of 1903 

J. W. Zlbble with SWIFT K at tbe pold llenrjr Hmidtri with Tl I lip trlnnari wrond, anil Urnrgr ):•■< I. . r. with Til f II tTBB tlilr.l 



2 



I February 6, 1904 



KANSAS CITY JOCKEY CLUB 



AND FAIR ASSOCIATION. 

RIDG-E) 



SPRING MEETING, 1904. 

Commencing April 30th and Closing May 2 1st, 1904. 
]\riISTETEE]Nr 



STAKES TO CLOSE MARCH 1, 1904. 



TIIK KANSAS CITS' DEKHV S.'.OOO Added. A sweep- 
stakes for three-year-olds (foals of 1901). $15 to accompany nom- 
ination and *l-'."> additional to start. $5000 added, of which $1000 to 
to second, $T>oo to third, and fourth to save starting fee Weights, 
oolts 119, geldings 116 and allies 1M. The winner of two three- 
year-old races of the value of $2500 each to tho winner, to carry 5 
pounds penalty. Starters in 1901 that are non-winners of a three- 
year-old race of the value of $2000 or of two of the value of $1000 
each to the winner, allowed 5 pounds. Maidens 10 pounds One 
and oue-quarter miles. 

TIIK MISSOURI HANDICAP-»11500 Added. A handicap 

sweepstakes for three-year-olds (foals of 1901). $5 to accompany 
nomination and $50 additional to start $1500 added, of which $300 
to second, $150 to third, and fourth to save starting fee. Weights 
to be announced three days before the race. Winnerof a race after 
the announcement of weights, 5 pounds extra, selling race ex- 
cepted. One mile. 

TIIK SWOTK PARK STAKES - 82000 Added A sweep- 
stakes for two-year-olds (foals of 1902 1 $5 to accompany nomina- 
tion and $50 additional to start. $2000 added, of which $300 to 
second, $150 to third, and fourth to save starting fee. The winner 
of one race of the value of $2000 or of two of the value of $1000 
each to the winner, to carry 5 pounds penally, selling races ex- 
cepted Non-winners of one race of the value of $1000, or of two 
the value of $100 each, allowed 3 pounds Non-winners of a race 
of the value of $lon allowed 5 pounds. Maidens m pounds. Selling 
race excepted Five furlongs. 

TIIK KANSAS CITY JOURNAL STAKES— • 1200 Added. 

A sweepstakes for two-year-old colts and geldings (foals of 1902). 

IF EXOn.ll .11 HPING HOUSES 



$5 to accompany nomination and $50 additional to start. $1200 
added, of wnich $200 to seoond,$IOO to third, and fourth to save 
starting fee. The winner of a race of the value of 11000 to carry I 
pounds; of two or more. 5 pounds extra. Non-winner of a race of 
the value of $500, or of two value of $100 each, allowed 3 pounds. 
Maidens 8 pounds. Selling race excepted. Four and one-half 
furlongs 

TIIK BABY STAKES— *1200 Added A sweepstakes for 
two-year old fillies (foals of 1902). $5 to accompany nomination 
and $50 additional to start $1200 added, of which $200 to second, 
$100 to third, and fourth to save starting fee. The winnerof a 
race of the value of $1000 to carry 3 pounds; of two or more, 5 
pounds extra Non-winners of a race of the value of $5M) or of 
two value of $100 each, allowed 3 pounds Maidens 8 pounds. 
Selling race excepted. Four and one-half furlongs. 

THE ELM BUKUi HANDICAP -S.lfion Added. A handi- 
cap sweepstakes for three year-olds and upwards $10 to ac- 
company nomination and $50 additional to start $3500 added, of 
which $500 to second, $250 to third, and fourth to save starting fee. 
Weights to be announced three days before the race Winner of a 
race after (he announcement of weights to carry 5 pounds penalty, 
selling race excepted. One and one-eighth mile. 

Ill K COUNTRY CLUB HANDICAP — 82000 Added. A 

handicap sweepstakes for three-year olds and upward. $5 to ac- 
company nomination and $40 additional to start. $2000 added, of 
which $100 to seconJ, $200 to third, and fourth to save startiog fee. 
Weights to be announced three days before the race. Winners of 
a race after the announcement of weights, 5 pounds extra, selling 
race excepted. One and three-sixteenths mile 
AKK HKKK, Jl'MrlXi; HACKS WILL HE INTERSPERSED THROUGH EACH WEEK. 



THE HUNT AND POLO CLUIt STEEPLECHASE 
HANDIC\P-«1500 Added A handicap sweepstakes for 
three-yearolds and upward $5 to accompany nomination and 
$50 additional to start $1500 added, of which $300 to second. $150 
to third, and fourth to save starting fee. Woights to be announced 
three days before the rac- . Winners of a race after the announce- 
ment of weights, 5 pounds extra, selling race excepted. Four or 
more horses of entirely different interests, or the race will be de- 
clared off. Starters to be named through the entry-box at the 
usual time of dosing of this day's racing, and those so named are 
liable for the starting fee. Full course, about two and one- 
quarter miles. 

THE STAR-TIMES HANDICAP— SI 200 Added. A handi 

cap sweepstakes for three-year-olds and upward. $5 to accompany 
nomination and $50 additional to start $1200 added, of which $200 
to second. $100 to third, and fourth to save starting feo. Weights 
to be announced three days beforo the race. Winners of a- race 
afier the announcement of weights, 5 pounds extra, selling race 
excepted. Six furlongs. 

THE KANSAS CITY WORLD SELLING STAKES-91200 
Added. A selling sweepstakes for three-year olds and upward. 
$5 to accompany nomination and $50 additional to start. $1200 
added, of which $250 to second, $100 to third, and fuurtb to save 
starting fee. The winner to be sold at auction for $3500. If for 
less, 3 pounds allowed for each $500 to $2000, and one pound for 
each $H)0 less to $500. Starters and selling price to be named 
through the entry-box the usual time of closing for this day's 
racing, and those so named are liable for the starting fee. 
Fifteen- sixteenth* mile. 



The full value of all stakes will be paid in cash. Liberal Overnight Events with attractive conditions. No Purse less than $500. 

XOTICE TO NOMINATORS — In Selling Sweepstakes more than two can be nominated, but only two can start. 

Entrance Foos Must Accompany Nominations. 

SPECIAL NOTICE — No entry will be received for any of the9e stakes except upon this condition : That all disputes, claims and objections arising out of the 
racing, or with re-tpect to the interpretation of the conditions of any race, shall be decided by a majority of the Executive Committee present, or those whom they 
may appoint, and their decisions upon all points shall be final. 

The Club also reserves the right to refuse the entries of any person, or the transfer of any entry, and without notice. 

Address all communications to the Secretary 

KANSAS CITY JOCKEY CLUB AND FAIR ASSOCIATION, 

664 Gibraltar Building, Kansas City, Mo. 



Washington Jockey Club 

OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

Race Course and Office during Race Meetings, Benning, D. C. 
Office In New York, 571 Fifth Avenue, "The Windsor Arcade ** . 

SPRING AND AUTUMN MEETING?, 1904. 

Spring Meeting, 1904, begins Thursday, March 24th, to include 

Thursday, April 14th— 19 days. 
Autumn Meeting, 1904, begins Thursday, November 17th, to 
include Saturday, December 3d — 15 days. 

The Beonlug. Spring Handicaps and the (irand Consolation will Close and Name at 
Midnight of Tuesday, February 16, 1901. 

The Benning Spring Handicaps. 



CAMPBELL'S 



EM0LL10 
IODOFORM 



To be run on the Jlr»t and last days of the Spring 
Meeting. 

Handicaps for three-year-olds and upward. By 
subscription of till each, which shall entitle the 
entry to start In the First and Second Handicaps, 
on payment of the additional starting fee of $20 in 
each. To close and name at midnight of Tuesday, 
February 16, 1901, (the third Tuesday in Febru- 
ary). Weights to be announced March 1, 1904. 

Conditions of tiik First Benning Sfbikg 
Handicap. Starters to pay $20 additional, with 
IIOUU added, of which $200 to the second. 1100 to 
the third. The winner to receive one-half of the 
subscription money, all of the starting money, and 
the balance of the added money, $700. 

Winners after the publication of the weights to 
carry 3 lbs. extra; of two races of any value, or one 
of the value of $1000, 5 lbs extra- of three of any 
value or one of the value of $1500, 8 lbs. extra. In 
case of horses handicapped at 118 lbs. or over, 
these penalties snail apply to the extent of one- 
half only. .Vi.r furlongs Columbia Course. 

Conditions of the Sei-ond Benning Spiuki; 
Handicap. Starters to pay $20 additional, with 
$1500 added, of which $250 to ihe second. $150 to 
the third. The winner to receive the remaining 
one-haif of the subscription money, all of the 
starting money, and the balanoe of the added 
money, $1100. 



Winners after the publication of Ihe weights of 
a race of any value to carry 3 lbs. extra: of two 
races of any value, or one of the value of $1000, 5 
lbs. extra; of three races of any value, or one of 
the value of $1500, 8 lbs. extra. In case of horses 
handicapped at 118 lbs. or over, these penalties 
shall apply to the extent of one-half only, except 
for the winner cf the First Handicap which shall 
carry 10 lbs. more than he carried in that race. 
Seren furlongs Columbia Course. 

AUTUMN MEETING, 1904. 

THE GRAND CONSOLATION-$3000 Added. 

The mum' Consolation, for two-year-olds, 
foals of 1902 Non-winners of $10,000 at time of 
starting. To close and name February Hi, 11104, at 
$10 each. If not declared by June 1. 1904. to pay 
$25 each If not declared by September 1, 1904, to 
pay $50 each. If not declared by November 1, 1904, 
to pay 1100 each. Starters to pay $100 additional. 
Tne Washington Jockey Club to add $3000, of 
which $500 to the second, $300 to the third. Colts 
to carry 122 lbs ; fillies and geldings. 119 lbs Non- 
winners of $5000 allowed 5 lbs , of $3500 allowed? 
lbs., of two races of $2000 allowed 10 lbs . of three 
races of $1500 allowed 12 lbs. Maidens that have 
not started to receive no allowance 

The winning of $IO,000 or more, shall be equiva- 
lent to a declaration. .Seren furlong* Columbia 
Course. 



NOTICE. 

The Chevy Chase Hunt Handicap Steeplechase, the Spring Hunters Steeple" 
chase, the Easter Monday Steeplechase will be duly announced to closa on Tues" 
day, March 1, 1<J04. The Dixie and Vestal for three-year-olds, to be run in 1905' 
will not close for now two-year-olds as heretofore, but will close for then three" 
year-olds in the Spring; or early Summer of 1005, the conditions of which will be 
duly announced. 

The entries for tho above are received only under the conditions as printed, 
and in all respects subject to and in accordance with the Rules of Tho Jockey I 
Club and the Washington Jockey Clvb. The Steeplechases in accordance with 
Rules of the National Steeplechase and Hunt Association. 

For entry blanks address the Breeder and Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, 
San Franciico, Cal. ' 



GALL CURE 

For GALL BACKS and SHOULDERS, CRUPPER 
SORES and SADDLE GALLS there is none 

superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS USUAL 
For BARBED WIRK CUTS, CALKS, SCRATCH- 
ES, BLOOD POISONED SORES and ABRASIONS 
OF THE SKIN it has no equal. 

It is very adhesive and easily applied to a watery 
as well as a dry sore. 

Its use will absolutely prevent BLOOD POISON- 
ING. In this respect there is no Gall Cure offered 
which can justly even claim to be a competitor. 
We placed It on the market relying wholly on its 
merit for success, and notwithstanding the fact that 
comparatively little has been done in the way of 
advertising the salesof 1900 were 100 per Cf nt great- 
er than the aggregate sales of Gall Cure preceding 
that year. This increase was entirely due to Us 
MERITS, and from it we feel justified in saying that 
It Is THE GALL CURE OF TH E 20TH CENTURY 
It is a quick and sure cure for those troublesome 
skin cracks under the fe ■■•■u i nich injure and often 
lay up race horses. 

All Trainers Should Have It In Their Stables 

l'KICE:— 3 OZ. BOX, USc.i 1 LB. BOX, SI. OO. 

Read our " ad." on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this pai» r. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs.,412 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Sold by all Dealers In Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask them to write any Jobber for It. 




PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



3 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-five years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsomo furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 

WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 




PERCHERON AND BELGIAN STALLIONS 

^JfSSttg" Cedar Rapids (Iowa) Jack Farm 

Three importations this season of prize-winning Percherons, Belgians 
and German Coachers and Catalan Spanish and Majorca Jacks. I have 
the largest Draft andCoach Horses in America and will sell morequality 
for the money than yeu can And anywhere 

Remember, the largest sale of Imported and High-Bred Jacks ever 
held in America will take place at the Cedar Rapids Jack Farm some 
time during the first half of April, 1904. Watch for date. 

W. L. DE CLOW. 



February 6, 1904J 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

r. w. kelley, PRopRirroR. 



Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— orrici — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
In SPB HI Black 886. 



Terra*— One Tear S3. Six Month* SI .73. Three Month! 91 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money anon Id bo sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addresned to F. W. Kjti.i.EV. 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications mast be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

San Francisco, Saturday, February 6, 1904. 



Stallions Advertised. 



TROT I IXi HKF.I). 

ARNER 31300. C. A. Ilranln, Son Loren70 

BAYSWATER WILKES 8:SM< S H. Hoy. Winters 

BONNIE DIRECT fc(Ktt« C L. Griffith. Pleasanton 

BONNIE STEINWAY C. L. Griffith, Pleasanton 

DICTATDS MEDIUM 3HW R. P Lalbrop. Hollister 

KINNEY LOU *OTX Budd Doble, San Jose 

LECCO *M\ Ed Mills, Pleasanton 

LI M on KRO — J. H. Williams, University. Cal 

MONTEREY S-.0»)< P. J. Williams, San Lorenzo 

NEAREST *-.2SV4 T W. Bars tow, San Jose 

NUTWOOD WILKES 2-.18H Martin Carter. Irvington 

SEARCHLIGHT £03M Ed Mills, Pleasanton 

SIDNEY DILLON 23I5T Frank Turner. Santa Rosa 

STAM B. 8:1 IX Samuel Gamble. Pleasanton 

TIIOKOl GllltKl l> 

HEYWOOD F. T. Hoffman, San Jose 

RAMESIS Monte White, Stocktrn 



THE FIRST TWO official announcements of har- 
ness meetings to be given in California this year 
will bo found in our ad vertising columns this week. 
Nearly twenty thousand dollars in purses and stakes 
are offered bj the associations making these announce- 
ments, the Breeders giving 91.1,700 and the Pleasanton 
association tOOOO. This is excellent for a starter and 
two or three more meetings will give us a circuit that 
will be worth while. Mr Thomas Smith of Vallcjo 
assures us that his program will soon be ready to an- 
nounce and that he will give three $1000 stakes. Mr. 
Smith gave a meeting last year and had two 91000 
stakes on the program and found that it paid. The 
smaller towns in California cannot afford to give an 
entire program of thousand dollar events, but that 
much money hung up for a slow class trotting race 
and also for a slow class pacing event will eecure 
enough entries to make the stakes self supporting. 
The State Agricultural Society will give a few of these 
big stakes for harness horses this year, so that the 
outlook is good for owners of good horses that have 
records no better than 2:20 ateither gait. The great- 
est drawback to a successful circuit in California is 
that few of the associations have any regular and 
active organization. In the district boards it is often 
hard to get a quorum as a majority of the directors 
take but little interest in the fairs, and the secretary 
is not paid enough salary to pay him to devote much 
time to the association's business, except during the 
time the fair is held . To make an annual race meet* 
ing successful the secretary should devote nearly his 
entire time to it throughout the year. In many 
districts the secretary is not paid over $150 per year 
for his services and no man can afford to put in very 
much work for that. There is now an excellent op- 
portunity in a dozen tow ns in California for the for- 
mation of harness racing associations, which should 
be organized for profit and not consist of more than 
three or four active men who are interested in the 
•port and desire to see it honestly conducted. A profit 
of from 91000 to three or four times that amount can 
be made by a bustling active organization of this kind 
that has the support of its towns people. All that is 
needed is a good, live secretary that will be enabled 
by his salary to devote his time to it. He need not be 
a person thatis thoroughly conversant with the game 
as any man of average ability can learn the duties of 
secretary by a few weeks' study and application. 
There are splendid opportunities in California for the 
formation of several organizations whose purpose will 
be the giving of annual race meetings. If Vallcjo and 
Pleasanton can give profitable meetings, surely places 
like Petaluma, Santa Rosa, Napa, Woodland, San 
Jose, Fresno, Stockton, Red Bluff, Cblco, Colusa and 
many others can do as well. 



"THE 8TATE DAIRY BUREAU has justcompleted 
' the compilation of statistics of the butter and 
cheese output of California during the last year. It 
is shown that the increase over the output of the pre- 



ceding season was 3)076,111 pounds. The total out- 
put for 1902-03 was 14,670,311 pounds. That of the 
preceding season was 31,528,763. The increase 
amounted to about 10 per cent. Altogether the dairy 
output amounted in value to $20,4.tti,l.".2 for the last 
season. Secretary Savior of the State Dairy Bureau 
claims that the dairy interest Is the largest income 
producer of any single line of industry in California. 
The gold mines of California have always been con- 
sidered the State's greatest wealth producers, but 
the figures show that gold mining must take second 
place to dairying The products of the California 
dairies brought three million dollars, more in 1808 
than the mines produced. As the dairy industry is 
only just beginning In California, many of the 
counties best adapted to it having no dairies and 
making no butter for export beyond their borders, It 
is evident that the future will see marvelous develop- 
ment in the output of California dairy products. The 
Orient and the isles of the Pacific will bo a great field 
for their consumption, and the California cow will 
bring in more gold to the State than her mines and 
vineyards. 

THE SULTAN OF MOROCCO has sent to Presl- 
* deal Roosevelt and family six thoroughbred 
Arabian steeds. Tbehorseintended for the President 
is a white stallion, and two or three mares are among 
the remaining five intended for distribution among 
the President's family. The Breeder and Sports- 
man suggests that Mr. John Gilmer Speed, the mag- 
azine writer who has been bewailing the fact that 
there is no distinct type of American horse, and never 
will be unless the Arabian blood bo used, have the 
position of Stud Master for tho American Nation 
created lorhim and that he bedirected totakecharge 
of these horses and proceed to found a family of 
American horses that will bo of that distinct typo 
which Mr. Spe>ed and Mr Randolph Huntington have 
agroed upon as the only perfect and useful one. Gen" 
oral Grant was sent a couple of pure blooded Arabian 
stallions while he was President, butdid cot do much 
with them as he could find a trotting bred s'.allion in 
nearly every county in tho country that was a superior 
animal, but perhaps Mr. Speed can evolve a breed of 
horses from this Arabian consigrment that will make 
the fabled wingod Pegasus look like the proverbial 
thirty cents. 

MR ROBERT LEIGHTON, Secretary of the North 
Pacific Fair Association, reached £an Francisco 
last week, having been engaged by the California 
Polo and Pony Racing Association to manage its 
meets that will be held this tronth at Del Monto and 
Burlingame. Mr. Leighton is thoroughly posted on 
the rules and regulations of tho class of sport and un- 
der his management the meets at Del Monte and Bur- 
Jingame will be successful beyond a doubt. Mr. 
Leighton tells us that tho North Pacific circuit of 
racing was a most successful one last year but that 
the directors expect to make it still more so this sea- 
son. Somo little difficulty was had in selecting dates 
that were agreeable to all concerned, bnt when the 
schedule was finally adopted there was a general 
acquiescence and every association ( n that circuit is 
now working to make tho season an entire success. 
Mr. Leighton will not re-tHrn home until after the 
first of March. 



Traders Must Make Good in Russia. 

There is nothing so distressing to the average horse- 
man as an unsound horse, and -nothing so embitters 
the feelings as to come into possession of one through 
a trick. It is tho one thing which a man will never 
forg ! ve or forget. A misfit in clothes or the purchase 
of inferior articles in the vegetablo or meat market 
may be overlooked and the patronage continued, hut 
no man will return a second time to tho person who 
has deceived him in a horse trade. Deception in th's 
dopartment cuts respect and friendship like a knife. 
In Russia every person who has a horse is obliged to 
furnish a certificate of ownership. If a horse is sold 
this certificate must be produced and transferred to 
the name of the purchaser. The one who sells a horse 
is to be responsible for its good condition, and be 
must return the purchase money and pay a fine If be 
deceives the buyer in nis representations of its health 
or age. If a diseased animal is sold and infects the 
purchaser's stock, the seller must pay all damages 
and be tried beforo a criminal court. American 
horsemen compare favorably, perhaps, with any other 
class of commercial people, and the reputable dealer 
is always willing and anxious to right a wrong when 
it is made to appear to h's satisfaction that the horse 
was not right when sold. Sometimes when this is 
not apparent the dealer will make a sacrifice rather 
than be suspected of wrong doing — Hun, >„,;>,. 



A royally bred MeKinney stallion, good size, band- 
some lofty carriage and a fast horn- as well, is offered 
for sale for f.VX). He was foaled in 1 8f>8. See adver- 
tisement of Russell Mc. in this issue. 



Lou Dillon's Grand Sire Today. 

"Marque," the well known correspondent of the 
llm ft Iti i i t »■ writes as follows: 

During my travels last week I visited Springvale 
Farm, Orcge n, III., owned by Judge J. H. Cartwright, 
of the Illinois Supreme Court. Judge Cartwright, it 
will be remembered, purchased Sidney 2:1UJ last May 
and placed him at the head of the farm's stud. After 
Sidney's brilliant showing in California in lHS'.i to 
1- '1. lie was brought l .i-t. i and t.ik. n to Miebignn, 
whero for nine years he was practically buried. Ills 
decade spent In Michigan Is to bo deeply regretted, 
for I am advised that he was br«»d to but a few mares 
while there. The old adage that "You can "t ket p a 
good horse down" has again proven true, for now 
that Lou Dillon has brought her grandsire into 
prominence again he is well situated to take ad- 
vantage of it. 

It was my first sight of Sidney and, of course, I was 
anxious to see If there was any resemhlanco between 
the two-mil utc mare and her grandsire. So two 
men see horses precisely alike, but I believe that nnv 
onefamiliar with Lou Dillon would agree with me in 
the statement that she is a Sidney from ber withers 
f irward — but behind is as unlike him as is possible, 
Sidney has the most peculiar back I ever saw on a 
horse. From his coupling to his tall he is almost 
perfectly horizontal, having scarcely any slope to his 
rump. This conformation is said to como from the 
Voluntasr family — Volunteer sired Sweetness 2:21|, 
Sidney's dam. Lou I). Hon, on the contrary, is quite 
high at her coupling and her rump has a pronounced 
slope, being very similar in this respect to that of 
Nancy Hanks. Hor shoulders, like her grandslre's 
aro full made and highly developed, as are also hsr 
forearms. Like Sidney, Lou Dillon bas the thorough- 
bred type of neck, it being fiat, sharply defined and 
beautifully crested. The mare's head is, of course, 
finer than her graodsire's, but the general outline 
and expression is the same, likewise the markings, 
both having a star and a white snip on the nose. 

Sidney, although t went t -three years old, Is remark- 
ably well preserved and retains his speed as well as 
vitality. He is driven every day and was recently 
brushed very fast on the streets of Oregon, much to 
the delight of the townspeople. He is a little horse, 
but has the ways and bearing of a gamecock, in which 
he also reninds mc of Lou Dillon. 

Judge Cartwright owns twenty-five well bred mares 
and Sidney w'll be bred to these as well as outside 
mares the coming season. With one or two exceptions, 
all the mares bred to him in 1808 seem to be in foal. 



Some Promising Horses. 

Mr. J. W. Zibble has seventeen trottt rs and pacers 
in his stables at the corner of 20th and Point Lobos 
avenues in this city. He is jogging them over the 
park roads, but expects to move to San Jose 
or Tanforan within a few weeks. Tom Smith 
2:13] is looking like a champion and Allesandro, 
2:40 that won so impressively as a two year old 
in Colorado last year, owned by Mr. Ceorge 
Warlow of Fresno, is growing into a magnificent 
horse. A light sorrel pacer owned by Mrs. Hamilton 
of Marin -county is one of the best green prospects 
Mr. Zibble has had for some time. He was sired by 
Meridian 2:12J. 

At the annual meeting of the shareholders of the 
Kentucky Association of Trotting Horse Breeder* 
Horace W. Wilson was elected secretary to fill the 
position made vacant by the death of the late E. W. 
Shanklin. Mr. Wilson succeeded Ed. A. Tipton as 
secretary of this association a good many years ago 
and took up the reins when the society was in the 
most fi mrishing shape, with a big surplus in the bank 
and no debts worth mentioning. Under his manage- 
ment prosperity continued, but a most flattering offer 
from the Empire City folks In New York induced him 
to resign. He went to Gotham and remained there 
some time but later disagreement with the owners of 
the trick led him once more to seek a now field, which 
he found as the secretary of the Charter Oak track 
and the ( ),ikb<y traek in ( 'incinnati, both the property 
of Jones A: Welch. The management eif these two 
courses Mr. Wilson still retains, and he has therefore 
assuredly made a record in his line for no man ever 
before was the secretary of three of the Grand Circuit 
associations in three different cities as widely sepa- 
rated as Lexington, Hartford and Cincinnati. 



Knap McCarthy made a good suggestion at Chicago 
recently where a group of trainers were discussing 
matters of interest to horsemen. Ho said: "The 
associations, especially tbe National, have accumu- 
lated a largo sum of money whieh should be used for 
purchasing a home for old and disabled trainers. 
The trainers have furnished all that money and there 
la no legitimate use It ran be put to by the associa- 
tions. The trainers should commence to agitato this 
subject and I believe they would have the support of 
tho breeders, owners o' campaigning stables and the 
public. There is plonty of money at hand to purchase 
a good farm somewhere and properly e quip it and if 
extra funds were needed a few benefits during the 
season would do the trick There is not a track 
manager In tbe county but would willingly sot aside 
one day for such a meeting and the public would re- 
spond In a liberal manner." 



4 



1&he greener mtfc ^povtmnati 



[February 6, 1»04 



a BBSS l-sS^ei SSS>s3 isSSsa LsSiSsa [»S3e3 isi£^E3 is-SSStea 
JOTTINGS. || 



Strong 2:09$, Dillon Boy 2:09} and Dan T. 2:07}. 
Ethel's Pride 2:13} and Sadie Mao 2:11 J, three year- 
olds, and Judge Green 2:10}, a four-year-old, were in 
the list of those winning over $5000. 



A GOOD TROTTER that has no record but is 
capable o f stepping three heats around 2:15 will 
be able to earn more money in California this year 
than could have been won in the same class last year. 
The offering of $1000 for 2:24 class trotters by the 
Pleasanton Association, and of $2000 for the same 
class by the Breeders will be followed by a purse of 
$1000 for slow class trotters by Vallejo. and the Cali- 
fornia State Fair will doubtless offer a $2000 stake for 
trotters of about the same class. If a horse comes 
out this summer that will be able to win all those 
stakes his net earnings over and above entrance fees 
will be $2400— quite a nice profit for one horse to earn 
in four races held within a radius of one hundred 
miles. If Petaluma, Woodland and Napa should give 
meetings, additional stakes would very likely be 
offered for the slow class class trotters and thus the 
earning capacity of a good green trotter would be in- 
creased materially. If the managers of the many 
good mile tracks in California could only get to- 
gether and organize a circuit on up-to-date lines, a 
prosperous season of racing could be held every year. 
The Breeders association has clearly demonstrated 
that good harness meetings can be made to pay with- 
out any other attraction than the regular racing pro- 
gram and owners and lessees of tracks should be able 
to do as well. It seems almost useless to try to get 
the district agricultural boards to organize a circuit. 
Since the appropriations were taken away, the 
majority of these associations are not even keeping 
up their organization. Some few are holding meet- 
ings each year, however, and in nearly every instance 
these fairs and race meetings are successful financially 

and otherwise. 

With Pleasanton stalls all filled and over two 
hundred horses working on the track horsemen who 
have not yet begun regular work on their strings and 
are only "jogging on the roads around home,' 1 are 
casting about for a place to go to, and San Jose track 
is being considered by many. Those who have already 
located there claim it is as good as any track in Cali- 
fornia and during rainy days no section has finer 
roads to jog over. San Jose should be able to give a 
first class harness meeting every year, and all that 
is needed is a live man to take hold of the project and 
push it to a successful issue. 



Few sections of the United States have a better lot 
of stallions standing for public service than will be 
found in California this year. The list advertised in 
the Breeder and Sportsman shows a particularly- 
well bred lot and is getting quite large although the 
season will not be fairly open for two or three weeks 
yet. The majority of breeders aim to have the colts 
d ropped in March or April as by that time the nights 
are seldom frosty in this section of the State, and 
feed is usually abundant. California has stallions 
and mares enough now in her borders to found a 
great family of trotters without going abroad for 
any new blood, but our breeders are progressive and 
not a year passes but young mares and stallions are 
brought here from the East to add to our breeding 
ranks. Owners of mares should look over the list of 
stallions advertised in this journal before booking, as 
the very line of blood wanted might otherwise be 
overlooked. 

Quite a large number of the trainers who are work 
ing horses on the California tracksat the present time 
are making calculations on going East in May or June 
to compete for the big purses that will be hung up for 
the trotters and pacers on the Grand Circuit. Of 
course all will not go who are now talking about it, 
but the probabilities are that there will be a larger 
representation of California horses on the Grand Cir- 
cuit this year than in 1903. It is meet and proper 
that this should be the case and it is to be hoped that 
the number of California stables that race on the 
Eastern tracks this year will be larger tban ever. It 
•vill not reduce the entry lists on California tracks 
in the least as none but horses that have shown speed 
will be sent, and for every fast one that is lost to the 
home, circuit two or three slower ones will have a 
better chance to be started and win part of the money. 
Pacers that can show three heats better than 2:10 and 
trotters that can trot in 2:15 and repeat the perform- 
ance should be able to win money over East if they 
are steady and consistent horses at those rates of 
speed. 

Fourteen trotters won over five thousand dollars 
each on the Grand Circuit last year and every aged 
horse but one of the fourteen had to trot heats better 
than 2:10 to win. They are Billy Buck 2:07}, Haw- 
thorne 2:06}, Jay McGregor 2:08, Caspian 2:07}, Kin- 
ney Lou 2:07}, Monte Carlo 2:07}, Masetto 2:08}, Dr. 



Sixty-six trotters won from $4775 to $1,000 on the 
Grand Circuit and of these but few paid expenses as 
entrance money and transportation expenses are 
heavy where the purses are large and the distance 
great between racing points Of these sixty-six trot- 
ters that could not be classed as good money winners, 
only a very few closed the year with a record slower 
than 2:15 and the majority had marks better than 
2:12. 

It was about the same thing with the pacing 
brigade. But ten of the va6t army of pacers won 
upwards of $5000, and these were Star Hal 2:06}, 
Elastic Pointer 2:06*, Nervolo 2:04}, Tom Keene 2:04',, 
King Direct 2:09}, Al Bock 2:08}, Frank Yoakum 
2:05}, Dr. Madara 2:08. Pan Michael 2:07} and Joe 
Pointer 2:05}. It takes a good horse to win enough 
on the Grand Circuit to pay the expenses of the trip 
from Detroit to Memphis. Dan R. 2:01}, one of the 
fastest of the fast brigade started in ten races and 
won but $3175, while Foxie Curd, one of the fastest 
of the brigade that started out in the spring without 
a mark, raced to a record of 2:07, started in seven 
races and won but $1850. 



It is very evident from these statements to see that 
a horse must be a good one to win any money at all 
on the big ring and that he must be not only good 
but lucky to return his owner a profit at the end of 
the season. 

The California Circuit was the smallest in 1903 for 
many years yet George G. won three races out of four 
starts and placed $1750 to his credit. He was a green 
horse at the start, took a trotting record of 2:12$ and 
could be sold to-day for a good figure. Ben F. that 
won all his starts and had a pacing record of 2:10 at 
the close of the circuit, won four races and his win- 
nings were $2000. Both these horses started at but 
three meetings — Vallejo, Petaluma and Sacramento. 
A profit can be made with a good horse in California 
even though the circuit here is not a large one. 

Horses at Woodland Track. 



The well known Woodland track where the horses 
always go so fast during the racing season is not a 
lonesome place just now. 

H. S. Hogoboom has nine head, among them Arthur 
W. 2:11}. This stallion is looking fine. Mr. Hogo- 
boom has a three-year-old colt by McKinney that h6 
is mighty sweet on. He is owned by Mr. C. L. Jones 
of Modesto The others are finely bred and all show 
well. 

Mr. Nason has a few nice ones — one a Diablo colt 
that is as fine as they make them. His green Falrose 
mare has speed to burn and what a road mare she 
should make. 

Peter Fryat has two — one a green pacer by Falrose 
that shows 2:20 speed with little work. 

A. B. Rodman has a few at the track. There are 
two McKinneys in his string that are nice lookers. 
He is going easy with them. 

Mr. Harrington Is gaiting several nice colts, one of 
them by Alta Vela 2:11} being a very attractive 
youngster. 

Walter Tryon has a small string, but some good 
ones among them. One is a filly by Dagon out of 
Swiftbird, the dam of Swift B. She can step some, 
too. 

The stallions are plentiful — Azmoor 2:20 and Bays- 
water Wilke6 2:24} will get the best mares and they 
are two pretty good horses, too. Arthur W. 2:11 ], 
his brother John A. 2:122. Tuberose. Gossiner Jr. , 
Mickey Free, Tomonco and perhapB one or two more 
represent the trotting stallions, jrhile Mr. Schwartz's 
thoroughbred Joe Terry is a good representative of 
his breed. So, you see, we are pretty well supplied 
with stallions. 

Dan O'Keefe does the shoeing for the track horses, 
and he can shoe with the best of them. 

They say here that Woodland will be on the circuit 
this year. We all hope so as we all take a pride in 
racing at home. Yours, Fani- arron. 



TheKenney Manufacturing Company, 531 Valencia 
street, San Francisco, has a second-hand Toomey 
cart with wood wheels, extra heavy carriage tie, 
cushion, etc., that is as good as new, having been 
used but little, which will be sold for $90, regular 
price $135. Harness, blankets, etc., goes with it. 
They also have a fine surrey for sale cheap and manu- 
facture sulky wheels and attachments to order. 
Pneumatic tires, solid cushions put on all kinds of 
vehicles. * 

For all kinds of weather there is no drink like 
Jackson's Napa Soda — plain or in a lemonade. 



A Son of Seymour Wilkes in Australia. 

By the last mall from Australia, Mr. J. W. Gregory, 
of the St. George Stables, this city, received a letter 
from Mr. Teddy of Ohaupo, Waikato, Australia, who 
purchased and shipped from here last June, the stal- 
lion Salisbury ana a handsome colt by Mr. 
Gregory's stallion Seymour Wilkes 2:08J. Mr. Teddy 
6tates that Salisbury has made a good season in the 
stud and will be raced during the coming circuit there. 
The Seymour Wilkes colt has filled out and is a splen- 
did looking three-year-old, although he will not be 
that age until June this year. Mr. Teddy says he 
has paced an easy mile in 2:20, which he considers as 
good as 2:10 over a good California track. Now that 
Seymour Wilkes is recognized as one of the coming 
great speed sires of California, it is pleasing to note 
that a good son of this horse has reached Australia 
and that he will not only be trained and raced to a 
low record, but will be used in the stud. Few stallioDB 
can show as uniform and handsome foals as the year- 
lings, two-year-olds and three year-olds by Seymour 
Wilkes. They are large, good boned, good gaited 
and are nearly all bays or browns, showing him to he 
a most prepotent sire. The big trotting gelding 
Monroe 2:12}, that took his record on the Grand Cir- 
cuit last year and will be raced again by Mr. Salisbury 
during the coming season, is a typical son of Seymour 
Wilkes and is known as the lightest going and best 
gaited big horse at Pleasanton. 



Year's Great Winnings. 

How great a lead the Wilkes family has over all 
other trotting families is shown when the winnings of 
the horses on the turf last year are tabulated and 
divided into family divisions. In the Grand Circuit 
last season 175 trotters and pacers descended in the 
male line from George Wilkes won $266,359. The 
Electioneer family or the forty descendants of that 
horse which won money in the big chain of races 
secured $39,560. The Dictator family is third with 
seventeen performers that won $39,460; the Tom Hal 
pacing family, with thirteen performers, won $38,080. 
Only three of the descendants of Happy Medium won 
money, but their total was $19,695. Seven de- 
scendants of Woodford Mambrino won $14,595; nine 
of the descendants of Nutwood won $11,025 and the 
same number of Strathmore's descendants won $10,- 
390. The only other familr that won an amount large 
enough to entitle it to consideration was the Almont 
family, seven of that tribe winning $9855. Five of 
the Wilkes group won over $10,000 each, namely, 
Billy Buck, with $33,000; Hawthorne, with $18,750; 
Jay McGregor, with $17,750; Kinney Lou, with $11,500, 
and John Taylor, with $10,050. Only four horses 
outside the Wilkes family won as much as $10,000, 
they being Sadie Mac, in the Happy Medium, with 
$19,000; Caspian, in the Woodford Mambrino group, 
with $11,975; Star Hal, with $10,650, and Elastic 
Pointer, with $10,000, both in the Tom Hal group. 



The Haywards Horse Show. 

Hay wards will have its annual horse and live stock 
show this year one week earlier than usual, Saturday 
afternoon, February 27th, being the date selected for 
the opening. 

The following officers have been elected to take 
charge of the show: President, George Gray; Vice- 
President, J. E. Geary; Secretary, G. A. Oakes; 
Treasurer, R. Reed. President Gray has appointed 
the following board of directors and committees: 
Board of Directors — George Grindell, A. Ramage, W. 
J. Ramage, G. S. Langan, M. Henry, C. M. Buck, D. 
S. Smalley, C. W. Heyer, C. Branin and A. Allen. 
Finance Committee — C. Heyer, D.Chisholm, R. Reed, 
J. W. McCoy, S. Simons; Mount Eden, H. Gansberger, 
A. W. Schafer; San Lorenzo, J, McCauley, C. Branin; 
Castro Valley, P. H. Hoare. Music Committee — R. 
Reed, Dr. Browning and A. I. Graham. 



How to Keep a Careful Record. 



Every stallion keeper knows that much of the success of a 
season depends upon the careful recording of services, making all 
accounts collectible and bankable. The best way to do this Is to 
secure a blankbook prin ted for the purpose . The book need not be 
expensive nor large, and if it prevents the loss of only one service 
fee it will have paid for itself many times over. 

A book that will lit the pocket is best, then it is always ready 
when you need it. 

All facts should be recorded that you want and none that you 
don't want. 

Then there should be an ind6x in the book so that every ser- 
vice could be referred to in a minute. 

A book that exactly meets all these requirements is published 
by F. H. Eno, 510 Mulberry street, Des Moines. Ia. 

The book is also provided with a legal note to be signed by 
the owner of mare for each service. 

This one feature of the book is worth many times its priee 
(only 50 cents each) and saves horsemen many dollars every year. 

If you will ask Mr. Eno for free sample pages you will readily 
sre how nicely the book is arranged to meet your needs. 



Daniel Sullivan, of Leadville, Colorado, is now the 
owner of Foxy Quiller 2:25, own brother to Cresceus. 



February 6, 1904] 



5 



i 



THOROUGHBREDS AND PONIES. 



.». .(. .». .( .». .». 

•♦• •♦• ••• ■♦• •»• •♦• 



Considerable interest is already evinced in the forth- 
coming meetings of the California Polo and Pony 
Racing Association. The first meeting of the asso- 
ciation will be held at Del Monte from Thursday, 
February 18th to Monday, February 22nd inclusive. 
Two days of that meet will be devoted exclusively to 
racing. The program consists of six events daily at 
distances ranging from three-sixteenths up to one 
mile and the weight conditions are so varied that thV 
possessor of a pony with any pretensions to speed will 
surely find one or more events to his liking. The[ 
association has made arrangements for the free trans- 
portation of ponies to and from Riverside, Santa Bar- 
bara, Burlingame, San Francisco and San Mateo.' 
Due notice as to date ana time of departure, etc., can 
be obtained from the secretary. More ponies are now 
in training than ever before and large fields will be 
witnessed in all the events. The entries for both the 
polo matches and races close positively on February 
Uth, and as the association desires to facilitate owners' 
arrangements as much as passible, an early applica- 
tion for stabling is requested. It is not necessary to 
become a member in the association in order to enter 
a pony, the only requisite to entry being that owners 
shall obtain the association's certificate as to height, 
etc., and that their ponies' pilot is a qualified gentle- 
man rider. All the purses and cups are of consider- 
able value and as no entry fees are demanded, the 
association's liberality ought to be largely appre- 
ciated and we predict a most successful inaugural 
meeting for the new association. 

The program of pony races to be run at the Del 
Monte meet is as foilows: 

First race, one-fourth mile, for ponies — Entrance 
fee $5. lop weight 165 lbs. ; 4 lbs. allowed on each J 
inch under 14h 2". Purs6 value to winner $75, en- 
trance fee to go to second. 

Second race, three-eighths mile, for ponies that ran 
but did not win a race on first day — Top weight 160 
lbs.; 4 lbs. allowed oneach J inch under 14b 2". Purse 
$65; value to the winner $50, second $15. 

Third race, one-fourth mile, for maiden ponies — 
Top weight 165 lbs ; 4 lbs. allowed on each * inch 
under 14h 2". Cup value to winner $75, second $25. 

Fourth race, one mile, for ponies — Top weight 166 
lbs.; 4 lbs. allowed on each } inch under 14h 2". 
Purse $125; valee to winner $85, second $25, third $15. 

Fifth race, three-sixteenth mile, for ponies that raa 
but did not win the fourth race on first day — Top 
weight 165 lbs.; 4 lbs. allowed on each ] inch under 
14h 2". Purse $05: value to winner $50, second $15. 

Sixth race, five-eighth mile, for ponies — Top weight 
165 lbs.; 4 lbs. allowed on each k inch under 14h 2". 
Cup value to winner $65, second $25, third $10. 



Washington Park Club, Chicago, presents its stake 
announcement in our business columns this week. As 
usual this popular club has arranged a most attractive 
lot of stakes for the great summer meeting to be held 
beginning Saturday, June 1 8th, and ending Saturday, 
July 16th. The stakes are headed by the American 
Derby, which has $25,000 added and is known all over 
the world as the greatest three-year-old event in 
America. At this meeting no selling purse is less 
than $600, and the other purses are $700 and upward. 
The overnight handicaps are $1200 and upward. 
There are seven stakes for two-year-olds, six of which 
have $2000 added money, and the other, the Hyde 
Park Stakes, $7500 added. Besides the Derby there 
are three stakes for three-year-olds, with from $2000 
to $4000 added. Six rich stakes ranging from $2000 
to $7500 added money are given for three-year-olds 
and upward. The Washington Park Club gives one 
of the leading race meetings held in America and 
leads all other associations in the West in daily attend- 
ance. Address James Howard, Secretary, for entry 
blanks. 

The Fixtures opened by the Westchester Racing 
Association for the spring and autumn meetings of 
1904 will be found in this issue of the Breeder and 
Sportsman. For the spring meeting there are the 
Gaiety, the Bouquet and the Laureate fcr two-year- 
olds; the Larchmont, the Baychester, the Van Nest 
and the Pocantico are for three-year-olds, while the 
Metropolitan, the Harlem, the Toboggan, the New 
Rochelle and the Spring Serial Handicaps are for 
horses three-year-olds and upwards. A weight for 
age race Is also given. For the fall meeting there are 
the Nursery Handicap, theChampagne and the White 
Plains Handicap for two-year-olds. The Jerome 
Handicap Is for three-year-olds and the horses three- 
years-old and upwards have the Municipal Handicap 
and the Morris Park Autumn Weight for Age Race 
which is two miles and a quarter and the celebrated 
Woodlawn vase is added under certain conditions. 
Owners should remember that the races for jumpers 
do not close until March 1st, and tne races for Hunters 
and Amateur cup do not close until April 10th. Entry 
blanks can be had at this office. 



The Benning Spring meeting held by the Washing- 
ton Jockey Club will begin Thursday, March 24th, 
this year and close April 14th. The Autumn meet- 
ing will open Thursday, November 17th, and close 
Saturday, December 3d. In this Issue of the Breeder 
and Sportsman are advertised the Benning Spring 
Handicaps to be run on the first and last days of the 
spring meeting, and the Grand Consolation $.1000 
added, to be run on the last day of the autumn meet-| 
ing. The Dixie Land and Vestal stakes to be run at 
Benning do not close until the spring of 1905 for then 
three year olds. Heretofore, they have closed for 
two year olds. Mr. S. S. Howland, President of the 
Washington Jockey Club, Treasurer of the National 
Steeplechase and Hunt Association, and member of 
the Jockey Club, Is now enroute for San Francisco 



He is coming by the southern route and will stop off 
at New Orleans, Los Angeles and probably Del Monte 
before reaching this city. 

The thoroughbred stallion Hameses, son of Gold- 
finch and Fleurelte, own sister to the great Firenzi, 
will be in the stud at Stockton this season and owners 
of thoroughbred mares should patronize him as he Is 
one of the best bred and grandest looking stallions in 
California. His service lee is $25, which Is very low 
for a horse of his qualifications. Hameses was bred 
at Kancho del Paso and sold as a yearling at auction 
for $6500. He showed remarkable speed as a two- 
year-old, but met with an accident and broke down, 
tie was started after that, however, and won In his 
class, beating a good field of horses. Messrs. White 
vV Longurs of Stockton then purchased him and in 
May, last year, bred him to five mares, all of which 
are in foal. The sire of Hameses is imp. Goldfinch, 
son of Ormonde and Thistle by Scottish Chief. Gold- 
finch is one of Hancho del Paso's greatest sires. 
Although the oldest ot his get are but seven years old, 
he is tne sire of over forty winners, among them the 
great mare Chclandry, Old England, Cunard, Gold 
Cure, killashandra, Sweet Lavender and many other 
big money winners. Fleurelte, the dam of Hameses, 
is one of I he greatest of broodmares. She is an own 
sister to the peerless Firenzi, one of the greatest race 
mares of turt history. Flourette has produced the 
winners Flower of Gold, Maxine, Flurry, Col. Dan, 
Silver II, Hameses and Convamore, the latter a good 
winner in England for three seasons. Hameses Is bred 
very much like the celebrated Flying Fox that stands 
this year for $3000. He is dark chestnut, five years 
old, stands sixteen hands and an inch high, weighs 
1125 pounds, and is a splendid individual. 



Dick Wells will not be entered in the quartet of 
great spring handicaps. He will be raced at Wash- 
ington Park, Chicago, after which he will be shipped 
direct to Saratoga. His first engagement at the Spa 
will be in the Saratoga Handicap. He will be nomin- 
ated for otherstakes at Saratoga and many of the big 
events at the Sheepshead Bay, Gra vesend and Morris 
Park fall meetings. 

The Eastern racing dates are as follows: Washing- 
ton Jockey Club, March 24th to April 14th, November 
17th to December 3d; Queens County Jockey Club, 
April 15th to 28th, November 3d to loth ; Metropoli- 
tan Jockey Club, Monday, April -5th, to Wednesday, 
May 4lh, October 17th to November 2d; Westchester 
Racing Association, Thursday, May 5th, to Wednes- 
day, May 25th, October 3d to 15th; Brooklyn Jockey 
Club, Thursday, May 25th, to Wednesday, June 15th, 
September 19th to October 1st; Coney Island Jockey 
Club, Thursday, June 16th, to Tuesday, July 5lb, 
August 27th to September 10th; Brighton Beach Rac- 
ing Association, July 6th to 30th, September 12th to 
17th; Saratoga Association, August 1st to 26th; 
Buffalo Racing Association, June 6th to 25th. Septem- 
ber 3d to 17th. 

A son of the great Hanover will make the season of 
1904 at San Jose. This is the chestnut horse Hey- 
wood, owned by Mr. F. T. Hoffman, of Boise city, 
who has brought his stallion here for the purpose of 
standing him for public service. Hanover was 
probably as good a race horse as was ever foaled in 
America and headed the list of winning sires for four 
years and is now gaining additional reputation 
through his sons. Hey wood is considered one of the 
best bred of the sons of Hanover. His dam is The 
Niece, the dam of Nephew, LaColoniaand Mantanza, 
all good winners. See was by Alarm, the first horse 
to run a mile below 1 : 43, and sire of the great race 
horse and stallion Hlmyar, sire of that great colt 
Domino. Jaconet, second dam of Heywood was an 
own sister to Iroquois, that was taken to England 
and won the Derby and St. Leger in 1881. Jaconet 
also produced Sir Dixon, Belvedere,. Hindoonet and 
Magna Charla. Sho was by imp. Leamington out of 
Maggie B. B. by imp. Australian, the horse that 
sired Joe Daniels and Springbok. Heywood traces 
16 times to Eclipse, 15 to Herod, and once to Matchen. 
He is a handsomeindividual standing IS, 3 and weigh- 
ing 1 100 pounds. He is the only son of Hanover that 
will stand for public service on this Coast. See ad- 
vertisement in this issue. 



Gold Heels, the famous thoroughbred of 1902, has 
beenenteied In the $50,000 World's Fair Handicap 
that will be run at St. Louis. 



In speaking about how great horses are shipped 
nowadays between the east and the west, or vice 
versa, with the horse in a palace car attached to a 
"limited," by special permission, and the ownor in a 
private car, with possibly bis trainer and jockey, a 
turfman recalled the trip which the great Miss Wood- 
ford made to Louisville in the autumn of 1883. She 
was engaged in the Champion Selling Stakes, and 
left Jersey City in an ordinary express car, In which 
were also Philip J. Dwyer and M. F. Dwyer, her 
owners; James Howe, her trainer; James McLaughlin, 
the jockey, and one attendant. Wandering accom- 
panied the mare as a traveling attendant. The 
Messrs. Dwyer slept In the car with the mare, and 
though they were met by representatives of the 
association and asked to breakfast, they excused 
themselves, and after seeing the mare done up in the 
stable, went to a kitchen on the track and had their 
morning meal. Miss Woodford won the race by a 
half furlong, with Green Morris' Slocum second, 
Wandering third and E. Berry Wall's Wallflower 
fourth. One hour after the race Miss Woodford 
was again on the train, homeward bound. In fact, 
she was soarcely cooled out when sho was shipped, 
and again into the box car went the famous owners, 
their trainer and jockey, and they were off for Jersey 
City. Miss Woodford, after Bhe had been given a 
mash, lay down, and with rare intervals did not get 
up until she reached Philadelphia. On the same 



train, in tho coaches, was the Philadelphia Basebal 
Club, which that year had won tho pennant. The 
champions were received with the blare of drums ard 
the firing of guns, and the tumult awoke the mare, 
who tH»camo nervous, not getting over it thoroughly 
until she reached Jersey City. That Fame evening 
she was walked to Jerome Park, and on the following 
day Miss Woodford won the Hunter Stakes at a mile 
and three-quarters by six lengths, a dead beat for the 
place being run by Appleby & Co.'a Carnation and 
J. E. Kelly's Holla, to whom the Dwyer mare was con- 
ceding seven pounds — Hnrsrmnn. 



Horses for Women. 



A few years ago anything In the shape of a horse 
was considered suitable for a woman to rido. Whis- 
pers wore heard of tho way a woman ruined any horse 
with hersldo-d ragging weight, due tothe side-saddle; 
the hard mouth resulting from her "riding on the 
bit;" tho way she insisted on treating It like a pet 
child, making It do every thing at most Inopportune 
times; anything for momentary display, urging and 
curbing in twenty yards, while, as to gaits, there was 
utter demoralization. In fact, an added punishment 
to tho In for no catalogue wasjsupposcd to be the eternal 
riding of a "ladies' horse." 

This has all changed. Woman has to a certain ex- 
tent taken the reins into hor own bands. Always 
great on mere appearances and the eternal fitness of 
things — which at times are an odd fit— she now wants 
a horse with good appearance. Either country life 
and closer association with horses has given the more 
or less correct Idea she now holds or she has picked It 
up at horse shows, and in that general channel of In- 
tuition which, after all, is the sheet-anchor of a 
smart woman's opinion in most things. She does not 
know why, but she gets pretty near the correct line 
in most things in which she is vitally interested. 
Thus to-day she throws aside the old time, no account 
steed, and insists on a horse that is good looking, 
which means that the horse must have that definite 
harmony of parts and proportion which gives the 
capacity for the work desired , and, also, to some ex- 
tent, presages the even temper and good disposition 
natural to the well bred, well cared for equine. It is 
sound common sense. One would not choose a club- 
footed man to win a sprint race. 

An average woman of today either wants an out- 
and-out hunter, or she leans to a distinct hunter type, 
even for park work. Such a horse should be temper- 
ate — that is to say, easily handled and not easily ex- 
cited, strong, safe, clever at fences, and fast enough 
for whatever the country may be. It is a vital feature 
that he be up to his weight, more than in the case of 
a man's horse, simply because a man rides "to his 
weight," but a woman on a side-saddle inevitably 
rides "over," nearly twenty pounds over it. 

The animal should to some extent conform to the 
height of the rider; a tall woman should have a horse 
about sixteen hands, and so down in proportion; but 
it must be remembered that the larger horses take 
more holding together than do the smaller ones. 
Witness the full-sized hunter and the polo pony. He 
should be longer in the back than is a man 's horse, 
this because the Bidesaddle covers more area; the 
scat of a woman, with habit, spreads over greater 
space, and with a short back or with a short-coupled 
horse, everything looks cramped and squeezed up, 
which is to bo avoided for several reasons, a chief one 
being that the long back gives greater elacticity of 
motion. 

Hu should above all things be able to walk fast, an 
accomplishment only too rare these days. He should 
trot freely, with an even and level movement, and be 
broken to canter, right fool first, at the touch of the 
heel. Ho should have good, flat, oblique shoulders, 
and a fairly high forehand, as a sidesaddle Is a great 
deal of trouble on a high-crouped horse — It will slip. 
He should be easy to control and patient, by reason 
of long "waits" at a gate, a gap, or other incon- 
venience, and, if not temperate in this respect, he is 
likely to become very restive at control and then 
rear, which is the unpardonablo vice of a woman's 
mount. 

Any horse that rears with a woman should beat 
once relegated to other divisions of the riding family. 
This is beyond appeal! Neither should a woman ever 
ride a roarer or a kicker, although a fairly largo 
experience in several countries shows that moro 
kickers are ridden by woman than man, and several 
high authorities havo justly included woman and her 
horse as one of the three evils to avoid contact with 
whon riding. This, however, was more applicable to 
past days, and tho great number of woman 's horses 
to-day are very good specimens and well behaved. — 

Esrliiini)c, 

A California trainer remarked the other day that 
about the only difference between a matinee and a 
regular record Is that in the first Instanco tbo frac- 
tion is left off by the timers while in the other it is 
added on. 



[February 6, 1M4 



Notes and News. 





Read the advertisement of the Pleasanton Racing 
Association. 

Joe Cuicello has taken his string of horses to the 
San Jose track. 

Ed. Benyon thinks Fereno 2:05i will be the queen 
of the turf if shelives. 



The Fresno people are asking the P. C. T. H. B. A. 
to give another meetiLg there this year. 



The elegantly bred young mare Adette by Adver- 
tiser 2:15} out of Arion's dam is in foal to McKinnev 

2:11*. ' 

Peter the Great 2:07} will not go to England as re- 
ported, but will head the Patchen Wilkes Farm 
famous stud. . 

Three $1000 stakes to be given at Vallejo will cause 
all the trainers to put tie navy yard town in their 
itinerary this year. 

The trotting stallion Black Beaver 2:25 stands 
seventeen hands high and weighs 1450 pounds. He is 
a son (-f Summit 2:20 J, grandson of Harold. 

The coming of the two-minute trotter has made 
things so lively on the stove circuit over East that de- 
mands are being made for official measurements of tho 
circumference of base burners. 



Geo. Ketcham, who returned last Monday from a 
trip to England, announced that while absent he sold 
to Louis Winans of Brighton, England, The Hang- 
man, a full brother to Cresceus 1:59^ for $23,000. 



Word comes from Carthage, N. Y., that two weeks 
ago tho trotting mare Corinna finished a mile on the 
ice in 2:15, lowering the race-record on ice and equal- 
ing that made last winter by Cresceus against time. 



Katrinka G. 2:14}, the brown trotting mare by 
Steinway that took her record over East last year, 
was sold at the Fasig-Tipton auction in New York 
last week for $l(i50. She is a full sister to Chas. 
Derby. 

Bayswater Wilkes will have quite a number of addi- 
tions to his 2:30 list this year. The sons and daugh- 
ters of this horse are attracting much attention from 
breeders who want the best qualities of the trotting 
families. 

Chico 2:14$, owned by Lou Childs of Portland, 
Oregon, has been consigned to the McCarthy sale 
which takes place in that city, March 1st, 2d and ."id. 
McBriar 2:14 by McKinney has also been consigned 
to this sale. 

One of the best looking foals at Pleasanton is a 
young Stam B. that belongs to Mr. R. E. deB. Lopez. 
It is out of a mare by James Madison, next dam 
Missie Medium that is by Rampart out of Belle 
Medium, the dam of Stam B. 



George H. Estabrook of Denver has just purchased 
in Missouri the five vear old trotting stallion Happy 
Walnut by Happy Heir, with a record of 2:24} and 
credited with a trial in 2:13}. He may be entered in 
the M. and M. stake next June. 



Chas. E. Cutler of 102 Clay street, this city, owns a 
three-year-old colt by Seymour Wilkes that is very 
promising. This colt is a full brother to the colt 
shipped to Australia last summer, mention of which 
is made on another page of this issue. 

The Committee on Rules of the National Trotting 
Association will meet in New York on the 8th inst., 
two nays before the meeting of the Board of Review. 
President P. P. Johnston has appointed Mr. J. C. 
Simpson of Oakland as one of the committee 

The citizens of Sacramento have decided to hold 
no Spring Street Fair this year. The last one was a 
losing venture and the books of the Southern Pacific 
Railroad Company show that it failed to draw the 
crowd of visitors from the outside that was expected. 

It is announced that a first-class mile trotting track* 
is to be built at Atlantic City, N. J., equipped with 
stable accommodations for 400 horses, a beautiful club 
house, and fine up-to-date grandstand. The esti- 
mated cost of the whole, including SO acres of land, is 
$300,000. 

The bay gelding El Milagro •->:10} by McKinney, 
bred by Mr. Rudolph Jordan of this city and sold at 
auction .for $700 as a yearling, again passed through 
the salesring in New York la3t week. He brought 
$3100 and was purchased by Mr. A. Johnson of Brock- 
ton, Mass. 

W. L. Snyder is the new secretary at Detroit. Mr. 
Snyder was trotting editor of the Xtir York Tele- 
-grayih for several years, and is a son of the well 
known trainer, W. H. Snyder, who raced Col. Kuser 
2:11}, Quartermarch 2:llij, and others in that section 
years ago 

Arner, the full brother to Diablo, should receive a 
good patronage this year. He will make the season 
at San Lorenzo. The family founded by his dam 
Bertha is destined to be one of the greatest of the 
many great ones that have descended from Hamble- 
tonian 10. 



If the drouth continues in Southern California, it 
is probablo that a very large proportion of the horses 
in training there will be sent to this part of the State 
to be worked. There are several tracks in this sec- 
tion where excellent aecommodatu ns. can be had and 
where feed is abundant. 



Four stables are now being gathered in Denver to 
go down the line next year. These are the stables of 
Edwin Gaylord, George H. Estabrook, E. A. Colburn 
and Wright & Stoddard. In addition Thomas Burns, 
Ollie Dillon, Frank Locmis and other drivers will 
take out an animal or two. 



Mose Hart, the well known horseman of this city, 
is not confining his operations entirely to buying and 
selling fast trotters and pacers. He now has a big 
high stepper at Pleasanton that gazes at the stars 
and lifts his knees to his chin, putting on as much 
style as a blue blooded hackney. 

H. R. Ward is handling a bay gelding by Antrim 
at Pieasanton that is improving very fast and bids 
fair to be a 2:20 trotter within the next few weeks, 
although he was almost unbroken when Ward began 
on him this winter. He has shown a mile in 2:27 
already and seems to improve every time he is taken 
out. 

According to statistics the 101,200 horses received 
in the Chicago market during 1!)03 were worth $5 
more per head on the average than the horses re- 
ceived in 1902. The gain over 1901 ran from $9 to $55 
per head according to quality. Carriage pairs aver- 
aged $455, drivers $150, saddlers $150 and general pur- 
pose $122. 

Dan Lawrence has a big gelding at the Pleasanton 
track by James Madison that is an excellent prospect 
for a fast trotter. It is a pity James Madison died, as 
his death was a loss to the breeding interests of the 
State. It isa greater pity that he was not pitronized 
more by breeders as his blood will be more valuable 
as the years go by. 

Secretary Horace Wilson, of theKentucky Trotting 
Horse Breeders Association, announces that the Stoll 
sweepstakes for foals of 1902, to trot as two year olds, 
for which the association had agreed to act as stake- 
holder, haB been declared off. There were or ly five 
nominators for the event, and they readily consented 
to the arrangement. 

Mr. 3 Christenson of this city met with a severe 
loss last week. His very handsome and fast mare 
Simone by Simmons lost twin foals by Stam B. 2:11}. 
Simone was nominated in the Breeders Futurity and 
several of the big eastern stakes, an3 Mr. Christenson 
naturally expected a fast foal from her to compete for 
first money in them three years hence. 

Strathline, who got a record of 2:07} last season, is 
out of Olivia, also dam of 31ack Line 2:22 and 
Dr. S. 2:22}, both records made last season. Olivia is 
by Strathmore, out of Ozoria, by Smuggler 2:15}; 
second dam Odd Stockings (dam of Springlock 2:19}, 
and two others), by Happy Medium; third dam, 
County House Mare by American Star 14. 

Major J. J B. DuBoisof Denver has purchased 
from A. V. Hunter of Leadville a stable of nine 
pacers. The string includes the famous stallion Car- 
bonate 2:09; his brother A. V. H. six years old ; the 
aged broodmare Beulab, with a mark of 2:14$ as a 
three-year-old: Rose Quartz, seven years old", and 
Carbonetta a two-year-old filly by Carbonate. 

W. J. Kenney, of 531 Valencia street, has just re- 
ceived three handsome new matinee carts and a No. 
15 sulky all of the popular McMurray make. Tho 
carts are just the thing for matinee racing. The 
sulky is finished in white enamel and striped in blue 
and gold. It is a beauty. Mr. Kenney sold this week 
to W. T. Harris of Oakland one of the new 1904 Mc- 
Murray road carts. 

Budd Doble will not have any trouble filling Kinney 
Lou's book this season. He is receiving letters from 
all parts of California in regard to booking mares, 
and they are in nearly every instance from mer who 
have made a success in breeding. As Kinney Lou is 
limited to a dozen mares his book will be full early. 
The colts by him now in Tehama connty are a very 
handsome lot of two-year-olds. 

A bill has been introduced Into the Kentucky Legis- 
lature making it a felony to buy or sell pools or make 
books in that State. If the bill becomes a law it will 
close the gates of every race track in Kentucky. It 
is alleged that there is something more behind the in- 
troduction of the bill than would apppar at first sight, 
for the reason that of late there has been no sort of 
agitation for such action from or in any representative 
section of the population. 

A feature of the sleighing carnival in Minneapolis 
last week was the appearance of an elegant but old- 
fashioned two-seated sleigh, once the property of 
Napoleon Bonaparte. This sleigh was purchased by 
a Boston millionaire in France and imported to this 
country many years ago; but at a recent dispersal 
sale of his effects by the executors of the estato the 
sleigh was sold and just came into the possession of J. 
D. Vivian, of Minneapolis. 

The handsome mare Nellie R. 2:19.}, whose picture 
appeared on the front page of tho BREEDER AND 
Sportsman of January 10th, is owned by Messrs. 
Frank and Joseph Long of Eureka, Humboldt county, 
who are prominent liquor men of tbat place. Nellie 
R. is very speedy as she showed last year when she 
was out for the first time. Five heats undor 2:20, 
winnineagainst tried campaigners with faster records, 
is proof that the Longs are in possession of an animal 
whose future will be worth watching. 



Budd Doble and Homer P. Saxe have bought of 
Tom Gannon, of Stockton, the four year old Mc- 
Kinney stud colt Parker McKinney. This colt is out 
of a Dexter Prince mare thi t can show a 2:20 gait any 
time she is called upon to do it and she is a pure 
gaited trotter. The second dam of the colt is by 
Elect, third dam by a son of Clark Chief. They ex- 
pect to make a very valuable colt of this son of Mc- 
Kinney and Mr. Doble will handle him a while at San 
Jose this spring. 

A great deal of time will be saved at the race meet- 
ings if the weight rule is abolished. Since the bike 
sulky was invented the weight of a driver has made 
very little difference, if any, to the speed of a trotter 
or pacer, and the time consumed in weighing a dozen 
men at the end of each heat has done much to pro- 
long the program until sundown. A race is seldom 
trotted where there are not several drivers who are 
overweight from ten to thirty pounds, and these 
heavy weights seem to win about as often as the 
fellows who are compelled to carry a lot of lead in 
their sulky cushions. 

The bay gelding Birdcatcher by Direct that Mon 
roe Salisbury campaigned on the California citcuit in 
1899, but failed to win with, is now one of the fast 
roadsters seen on the speedway in Golden Gate Park, 
San Francisco. Birdcatcher spent two years at Cape 
Nome, Alaska, and was brought back last fall by his 
owner, Mr. Silion, who thinks the old fellow is a better 
horse now than he ever was. He had a brush the 
other day with Mr. S. Christenson who was driving 
his fast trotting mare Fay Templeton, and they made 
the last half of the speed way in 1:06 with the mare a 
length or two ahead at the finish. 



Theodore Coleman, formerly manager of the har- 
ness races held in connection with the New York 
State Fair, is authority for the statement that the 
Kmpire State district county and other fairs receive 
money enough from the racing tax to pay all their 
premiums and leave a good big balance in the treasury. 
Mr. Coleman says there are around fifty of thes" fairs 
and that each receives from $1500 to $4000 each per 
year without exhausting the fund. Mr. Coleman adds 
that he has been mixed up with these New York 
fairs for many years and that he never knew them 
so prosperous as they are to-day. 



Andy McDowell writes to the 'Trotter and Pacer 
from Vienna, that, after a rough sea trip, he has his 
New York purchases of last fall all in shape to begin 
training. Belle Kuser 2:08, is working well, and will 
race successfully, like her sire, over seas. The other 
trainers at Vienna include the former Readville 
handler, Eddie Switzer, who is now with Mr. Hauser, 
owner of the largest stock farm in Vienna, and owner 
of McVera 2:10}. Ben Tappan, Dan Keefe, George 
Borderman, James Brown are there in addition to 
Andy McDowell. The little stallion, Wainscott 2:10}, 
is doing well in Diefenbacker's string, and should 
race well. The 6eason opens March 2, over there, 
three weeKS earl'er than in former years. 



In a letter written to the Breeder and Sports- 
man by Mr. T. W. Barstow, owner of Nearest 2:22 
full brother to John A. McKerron 2:04$, he says: 
"My bay filly Just It by Nearest stepped an eighth 
in 17 secondslast week and I think 6he can step one 
in just 16 seconds. How do you like that? There 
are three or four more right close by that are knock- 
ing at the door." This don't surprise us. That 
Nearest will be a great sire of speed is absolutely 
certain. He just can't help it. He is bred to be a 
sire. When Alone 2:09} came out some of the knockers 
said that she came by chance and Nearest would never 
get another, but there is one at San Jose now that is 
juBt as good as Alone and will not stop at 2:09} Alone 
will knock several seconds from her mark the first 
chance she gets. Nobody ever saw a really poor one 
sired by Nearest. They all show speed. 



James Butler, of New York, who owns East View 
Farm, the home of Direct 2. 05$, and whose racing 
string is managed by Monroe Salisbury of Califernia, 
has adopted a course exactly opposite to that of most 
breeders for disposing of his surplus stock. Most 
breeders sell the untrained products of their farms, 
preferring to keep those which training hai shown 
to be good race horsep, but Mr. Butler has decided to 
offer at public sale each fall the record horses in his 
6table. believing this course will suit buyers better 
and he himself will take the chances of getting 
another racing stable from the green youngsters on 
the farm. Mr. Butler now has one of the largest 
bands of broodmaresin thecountry and it is necessary 
for him to dispose of a part of his young horses each 
year. It is just possible tbat his decision to sell his 
record horses instead of bis untrairtd yourgstf if, 
will turn out to be an excellent thing for him. 



An interesting incident in connection with the 
meeting of the joint committee which rendered the 
absurd decision regarding Lou Dillon's record to high 
wheel sulky, was the opinion given by the veteran 
bicycle rider, Thomas Eck, regarding the probable 
benefit a trotter or pacer would derive by being pre- 
ceded by a pacemaker, as Lou Dillon was in her fast 
miles Inst fall. Eck is considers d an expert on matters 
pertaining to pace used in bicycle races against time, 
and he stated tbat so long as the rider keept right up 
against the motor or the object in front setting the 
pace, he will be greatly benefited by it, but the 
instance he pets over five feet benind the pacemaker 
he is out of the vacuum and unable to get up again. 
When shown two photographs taken at Readville, 
Mass., the day Lou Dillon first trottee" in two minutes, 
which showed, at the two different points in the mile 
at which the photographers were stationed, the run- 
ner to be from 15 to 20 feet in front of the trotter, he 
stated that the pacemaker, as far as wind resistance 
was concerned, was of no benefit whatever. 



February 6, 1904 



Thoroughbreds as Pacers. 

Frederick Watson has an interesting article in the 
last number of the American Hor& />7i.i/ t r. from 
which we make the following extracts: 

Some two or t aree weeks ago I mentioned the fact 
that we should almost certainly see one or more 
strictly thoroughbred horses out the comiDg season, 
as pacers, with "the straps" on. This piece of news, 
together with my comments on the possibility of 
teaching thoroughbreds to pace, rather startled some 
people, especially our old friend "Raymond," and 
really, I am not surprised that it did, for the idea is 
certainly rather startling any way. There have been 
students of breeding and of the horse in general who 
have asserted the fact that no thoroughbred horse 
was ever known to pace, but this idea is disproven by 
actual eye witnesses. Lots of times I have seen thor- 
oughbreds pace when exercising on the Ocean Boule- 
vard in Brooklyn, and also at the tracks, both in 
their work and even in actual races. Two years ago, 
the exact date I have forgotten, I saw a thoroughbred 
actually win a race on a pace. The facts of the case 
were these: The horse was winning "going away, " 
as they say, and it was evident that the jockey was 
trying not to show up the horse any more than he 
could help, so he was taking him back as much as 
possible, and did so to such an extent that he pulled 
the horse into a pace, and he went under the wire in 
that way. Hard to believe, I know, but I saw it, and 
believe that I can tell whether a horse is pacing or 
running. 

Last year, to be exact, on July 14th, at the Brighton 
Beach track, there was a horse called Minotour, a 
bay gelding by Eon, dam Mermaid, that cooled out 
on a pace. He paced, walked on a pace in the pad- 
dock just as many a hoppled pacer has been seen to 
do from regular habit. There was no question about 
this, for the case attracted my attention so much 
that I stood and watched him make five or six circles 
of the paddock, and he walked on a pace all the time. 
This peculiarity 1 marked on my score card, which 
ajjjjats for the fact of being able to quote the day 
and name, etc , of the horse. If this horse walked 
on a pace without being taught by the help of the 
straps, why could he not be taught with the straps to 
pace at a faster gait than a walk? 

The purposeof my original article regarding putting 
the hopples on thoroughbreds was to show that as 
hoppled pacers are artificially gaited, it would be just 
as well to start in with all the actual speed that could 
be obtained and teach that to pace, so that instead of 
taking a horse that could not go a mile at any kind 
of a gait, trot, pace or run, in two minutes, and by 
putting the hopples on him make a fast pacer out of 
him, why not start in with better than two minute 
speed at once and put the hopples on a thoroughbred 
and teach him to pace. I have always contended that 
a hoppled pacer was an artificially gaited animal and 
was made so by force not by education Without the 
"controlling influence" of the straps some of these 
pacers are apt to change their gait back to the 
original fastest gait of the natural horse, the run, 
quite a strong argument in favor of my theory that 
the original pacerscarried quite a lot of running blood. 
I have always been an anti-hopple man and so argued 
that, if we are to have horses on the track that are 
compelled to pace because their legs are tied together 
in such a manner that it was impossible for them to 
move them at any other gait than a pace, why take 
a slow horse and force him to pace when you can get 
a faster one and force him to pace by tying his legs 
together so that he must move them at the pacing 
gait. 

Until the introduction of instantaneous photogra- 
phy it was generally believed that when a horse ran 
(galloped; he gathered hi- two front legs under him 
at the same time and made a series of jumps, but a 
series of pictures of horses in the act of running 
shows that this is not the action of a running horse 
at all; in fact he hardly over gets into such a position. 
Sometimes he has only one leg on the ground at a 
time, sometimes two, not always two front or two 
hind, as the action of jumping suggests, but some- 
times one front and one hind leg, and sometimes he 
has three legs on the ground at the same lime. This 
shows that the action of runnirg is not actually put- 
ting down the two front feet on tho ground together 
and then putting down the two hind feet, as was 
generally accepted as the action of a running horse. 
In some of the pictures it is seen that the horse has 
one front foot and the corresponding hind foot, on 
the same side, on the ground at the same time, only, 
instead of their positions being both extended to the 
front or rear, as is the case with a pacor, the front 
foot is extended to the front and the hind foot is ex- 
tended to the rear. Many of these pictures of runners 
In action show the same positions as can be noted in 
pictures of pacers in action, and in the latter it can 
often be noted that the pacer's feet are not on the 



ground exactly in the manner that it has boon 
generally supposed that they were. 

I contend that the pacer is running at one side at a 
time, and that he gets his gait from trying to break 
from the trot to a run, but "splits the difference,'' 
and only breaks at one side at a time. This Is due to 
two causes. In tho case of tho paoing bred pacor, his 
inherited idea to go on a trot, which ho gets from tho 
coarser and slower side of his family blood, makes 
him try to perform on a trot, while tho inclination to 
run which he gets from the thoroughbred strain that 
he inherits prompts him to run, and both inclinations 
being equal ho does half of each, and the result is that 
while he picks up his foot with iho action of a trotter 
he picks up the two together that he would if he was 
going to run, and the result is a pace. 

Take a runner that can run a mile in 1:40 and ask 
him to pace in two minutes, and you are only asking 
him to travel within *0 per cent of his actual speed 
capacity; but take a t.rotter that can trot in 2:20 and 
ask him to pace in 2:05 and you are calling upon him 
for a much higher percentage of his spoed capabili- 
ties, possibly even his limit, as few, If any, horses that 
are trotting bred can run a mile as fast as they can 
pace one, although when pressed to the limit of their 
speed when on a pace they will try to go faster by 
breaking into a run, and for a little way can go faster. 
I am firmly of tho belief that thoroughbreds can be 
taught to pace, and as artificially gaited horses, such 
as hoppled pacers, are allowed on the tracks and are 
evenencouraged.it would seem like good judgment 
to get the very fastest material possible ' to manu- 
facture them from," and, therefore, why not take tho 
horse that you know can go faster by far than the 
trotting bred one? 

If thoroughbreds can he taught to go in harness 
and to go on a trot while in harness, and they are so 
taught, why cannot they be taught to goon a still 
faster gait, the pace. When this is done it will be the 
most convincing evidence that the hoppled pacer is a 
manufactured article, and should not be permitted to 
compete in the same classes as the pacer that has 
been educated to pace, and not forced fco by tying his 
legs together in such a manner that he is not able to 
do anything else but pace. I do not want to see the 
thoroughbrod degraded into a hoppled pacer, but I 
believe that if a few were so sacrificed it would result 
in the final and permanent abolition of what I have 
always considered a disgrace to tho sport of harness 
racing, the hopples, and this opinion is shared by a 
good many who are not influenced by the ownership 
of one or more pacers that have to wear the straps. 



Admiral Dewey 2:14 1-4 Brings $5900. 

Admiral Dewey, the six-year-old son of Bingen 
2:06J and Nancy Hanks 2:04 brought the top figure at 
the Fasig-Tipton Midwinter sale at New York last 
month. The Trotter and Pacer says: 

"The opening day's star lot was, of course, the 
wonderfully fast Admiral Dewey 2: 1 4 J , at three, from 
J. Malcom Forbes' select stud at Ponkapog, Mass. 
He is a son of Bingen 2:0(iJ, that as a two-year-old 
trotted a public exhibition at Portland in 2:12J, the 
nearest to Arion's Incomparable 2:10j yet trotted, 
while his d am was the old turf (j,ueen, Nancy Hanks 
2:04. For weeks everyone has been registering guesses 
as to the last bid when his time came to chango 
owners, and it was not generally expected that he 
would command over 9.1500 despite the ext-eme speed 
inheritance and possession of a low race record at 
three. Although he is an untried stallion, his superb 
breeding will entitle him to the consideration of every 
student who knows a good pedigree, and bis success 
in the stud is conceded. 

Three men wanted the big bay, Hon. J. M. John- 
on, breeder of Sadie Mac 2:1 1 j, of Calais, Me.: Andrew 
J. Welch and Warren A. Bacon, Paris, Ky. Some- 
one started the bidding at $2500 and it rapidly run to 
double the figure. The last instalment found the trio 
mentioned fighting it out at $100 bids. The gentle- 
man from Kentucky stopped at $5700; the Maine 
breeder went bis limit at $5800 and Orlando Jones, 
who represented Mr. Welch, got the prize at $5iM)0 
cheered to the echo. 

He will go to the stud probably at Charter Oak 
Park, and should slro early and extreme speed. Mr. 
Welch has heretofore been singularly unlucky with 
stallions as Wild Rake 2:22? and Bow Bells 2:1!)}, both 
of which ho was interested in, died early and sudden 
deaths. With Atlantic 2:21 J, ho had some luck in 
the palmy days of racing long ago. The Admiral 
must prove a good investment." 



A fine surrey, one of ihe best made, and handsomely 
finished is for sale at about half its value by the 
KeDney Manufacturing Company , ON Valencia street, 
San Francisco. , 

Strike! — if they don't give you Jackson's Napa 
Soda when you ask for it. 



Ready Reference Table. 

The following tablo gives the time by eighths of 
miles that are covered at any rate of speed from three 
to two minutes: 



22 . 

22 '< 

22', 
22 

2'ft 
2. . 

21ft 
21ft 

2T. 

21ft 
21 

20ft 

20* 

20 H 

20ft 

20ft 

20* 

*>ft 

20 

19ft 

'9* 

19H 

'9* 

19ft 

«9* 

'9 ft 

'9 

18ft 
18 V 

18ft! 
18ft, 
18*1 
i8ft! 
18 

vH\ 
' 17* 
,17* 

17^1 

17* 
,17ft 1 

V\ I 

16ft 
,16* 
16ft 
16ft! 
16ft 
I6*| 

'6 i 
I5ft 
'5* 1 
>5ftl 
'5ft| 
I5ft 
'5* 
I5ft 
»5 



45 

14 >4 

44 'A 
44 '4 
44 

43 V 
43 ft 
43 * 
43 
4aV 
42ft 
42* 
.42 
41 \ 
•4>ft 
4>X 
41 

•40* 
■40 'A 
.40* 
.40 

39* 
•39* 

39 X 
■39 
.38* 

• 38ft 
.38V 
•38 

■ 37,* 
37* 

•37V 
37 

.36ft 
■36* 
■36 
•35* 
•35ft 
35* 
•35 

• 34* 

• 34ft 

• 34* 
34 

•33* 
•33ftj 
•33* 
33 J 

• 32* 
.32* 

• 32* 

•3'*^ 

•3'fti 

•3'*j 

•3' 

.30* 

• 3°ft 

• 30* 

•30 ! 



07 « 
y? ft 

06 v 

06ft 
06 
05 ft 

os* 

04ft 
04 'A 

f>4ft 
03* 
03 ft 
03 
02 ft 
02* 
01ft 
01 ft 

•OI,ft 

00H 

00 
•59ft 
•59* 
.58ft 
■5-S'j 
•58ft 

57* 

57ft 
•57 

56ft 
.56* 

•55ft 
•55ft 
•55ft 
• 5 4 '4 

54ft 
■54 

53ft 
•53* 

■ 52ft 

■ 52ft 

•S2\ 



» 30 

1 29 ft 
1 29 

1 2S'. 
I 28 

1 27 ft 
1.27 
1 26 ft 
1 26 

1 25ft 
I 25 



t 52": 
1 SI % 
I 51* 
I 50ft 
I SO 
1 49 ft 
I 4.8* 
■ 48ft 
1 47 ft 
1 46^ 
1 4 6 * 



l.24*j I 45ft 
124 1 145 



[,33 ft 
123 

I 22ft 
1.22 
I2lft 
1.21 

I 20ft 
I 20 

1.19ft 
I 19 

i.'Sft 
1 iS 



'•44ft 
'•43* 
1 43 ft 

I 42' I 

I 4' ft 
1.41* 
I 40ft 
I.40 
1 39ft 
1 JW 
1.38} 
i.37ft 



Ii7ft!i l6ft 



1 17 
1 '6ft 
1 .16 
'•'5ft 
1 15 



i i4ft i-33ft 



1 14 



i«3 

I.t2ft 

1 12 



136* 
1 35 ft 
1 35 
1 34 1 1 
' 33* 



• ; 4 



H 



•5 
214* 

2 13ft 
2 1 .• \ 
2 1 2 
III* 
2 10ft 
209V 
2 09 
208:4' 
2.07 ft 
206V 
2.06 
2 05V 
204ft 
203 V 
2.03 
2 02 M 

2 Olft 

2 00* 
2 00 
1 59* 

1 58,4 
1-57* 
1 57 
1 56* 
•55ft 
1-54* 
154 ,213 
1.53* 2.12ft 



2 37 ft 
236ft 
2 35* 
2 

234 
^ 33 ft 
232K 
2 3' ft 

2 3«>ft 
2.29ft 
22SK 
2 27ft 
2 27 
2.26ft 
2 25tf 
2 2\ s 

2. 23 ft 
2 22H 

2 2 \ \ 

2 20ft 
2.20 

2- I9ft 
2.18* 
2.17ft 
2.l6ft 

2I5ft 



OMt 

MU 



3CO 

2 59 
2.58 
2 57 
256 
2 55 
2 54 
2 53 
2 52 
2 .SI 
2 50 
2 49 
2 4S 
2 47 
2 46 
2 45 
2.44 
2 43 
2 42 
2 4' 
2.40 
2 39 
238 
2 37 
2.36 
235 



i-32ft 



i-i3ftj i-3'ft 
i-3i* 
i-3oft 
1.30 



152ft 



1.51* 2.10ft 
1 5i 
150* 



i-49ft 
i.4*'-« 
I.48 



l.ltft 1.29ft: 1. 47* 
1. II 1.28* 1.46ft 
i.ioft, 1.28ft 1.45* 
10 I 1.27ft M5 



1.09ft 1.26ft 



5'* ' 09 



1.26 V 



1.25ft 
125 



5ift 'o8ft 
.51 1 08 
50ft] 107 ft 1.24ft 
50V-IO7 123* 
.49ft, 1.06 ftj 1.23ft 
.49ft 1.06 I. 22ft 



2.14* 2.34 
213ft 2 33 
2 32 
2 3i 
2.30 

2.29 



2. 1 1 * 



2.09ft) 2.28 

2.08ft|2.27 
2.07*! 2.26 

2.o6fti 2.25 
2.06 2.24 

2.05 ft 
2.04* 
2.03ft 

2.02ft 

2.0lft 



'•55ft 

49ft! , 5ft' i-2ift! 1.38* I 54ft 



•48* 

.48ft 
.48 



•05 



1.04 ft I 20 ft 

1.04 



47ft i-cj3ft 1.19ft 
■47* 103 
.46ft 1.02ft 
•46ft 1 



46ft 1.01ft 1.16ft 



1.21 '., 



1.20 



1. 18* 
1.18ft 



117ft 1 33 



•45* 101 
•45ft i-ooft i.Xj 
.45 j 1.00 j i.15 



1.16V 
5ft 



'•44V 
1.43ft, 2 00V 
i.42v| i.59ft 

142 1.59 
1.41V, '-58ft 
1.40ft I.57V 

'•39*1 '-56ft 
'•39 



'•37ft 1-53* 
'•36* 152ft 
136 152 
'•35*1 '5'ft 
i.34ft] 150* 
'•33* '-49ft 



i.48ft 
i.47ft 



'•32* 
1.31ft 1.46V 2.02 



I-30V Moft 
I.30 »45 



223 
2.22 
2.21 
2.20 
2.19 
2.18 
2.17 
2.16 

2'5 
2.14 

2 '3 

2. 12 
2. I I 
2.IO 
2 09 
2.08 
2.07 
2.06 
2.05 
2.O4 
2.03 



2.0I 
2.0O 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy anil 
positive cure lor 

Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock 
Strained Tendoni * 
and all lam-nr-s 
and other bony 1 
disease! or Paran 
Removes all Bu 
Cattle. 

A. I II I M \ \ 111 Ml III IC I. - . 

mn l l«m. Rpriilna. Nmr 1 lii-niil, 



Til UVUICI-WlLLUISCOlrm.ClMcltBd. Obiu 



Founder, wind PuBa, 
om Spavin, Ringbone 
nor). Curea all akin 
i, Tbrush. Diphtheria, 
hes Irom Horses or 



8 



[February 6, 1804 




ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. D» WITT. 




Victoria Show. 



The World's Fair Dog Show. 

The kennel show at the World's Fair in St. Louis 
will be held Tuesday to Friday, November 8-11. In 
order to conform to the international character of the 
Universal Exposition it will be held under its own 
rules in which, however, full recognition will be piven 
to the kennel clubs of the respective countries which 
may be represented. A. certificate showing registra- 
tion in the studbook of the country from which the 
animal is exhibited will be required. Thus any ap- 
plications for the entries of dogs of recognized breeds 
owned in the United States must be accompanied by 
a certificate on a prescribed form showing registra- 
tion in the American Kennel Club. Such certificate 
from secretaries of kennel clubs in other countries 
must be attested by the chairman of that country's 
commission to the World's Fair. According to the 
preliminary plan entries will close September 20. The 
classification is intended to include only established 
breeds of record, and work upon it and otber details 
relative to the Universal Exposition kennel show are 
now well in hand under the direction of the Chief of 
the Department of Live Stock, Mr. F. D. Coburn. 

The Universal Exposition kennel show of 1904 will 
be held for the promotion of the special interests of 
dog fanciers in all parts of the world, and on this 
account judges will be chosen for their especial 
qualifications and their intimate knowledge of the 
characteristics and qualities makiDg valuable the 
respective breeds upon which tbey are to give judg- 
ment. The rules provide for reckoning of ages from 
date of birth to September 1, 1904. 

In some ways the World's Fair kennel show rules 
will make for new standards, but only on such lines 
as are worthy of a universal exposition and creditable 
to the industry concerned. The plan for holding the 
dog show at the World's Fair and a preliminary 
sketch of the classification and rules have been sub- 
mitted to the officials of the American Kennel Club 
and the Canadian Kennel Club and approved by them. 

The foregoing has been commented upon in a very 
pertinent manner by the .American Stock-Keeper which 
gives the following timely suggestions: 

"We do not krow who is advising the World's Fair 
people at St. Louis on the coming great dog show 
they are announced as goiug to assemble, but it 
strikes us that they are in need of a little wholesome 
ad vice in the way of preliminary and recognized ar- 
rangements. The trouble with these affairs is that 
every one wants to have a finger in the good thing. 
That is what knocked the Chicago Fair show. The 
Pan-American was more of a private affair under es- 
tablished procedure, but it is evidently the intention 
of the St. Louis Chief of the Live Stock Department 
that the show be run under rules and regulations 
that apply more or less to the general departments of 
the Fair, but not to dogs as now prescribed by the 
teachings and experience of years. 

The Fair managers should bear in mind that very 
few if any dogs would come over to America from any 
country expressly for this show, if the experience of 
the Pan-American goes for anything, although dogs 
might be imported at the time for this and other 
shows in the same way that they are being imported 
now for the W. K. C. show this month, but probably 
half a dozen would be the limit. The idea, therefore, 
that the international phase will cut any figure is 
without grounds, and to compel each entry to be reg- 
istered in the stud book of the country it comes from 
and show a certificate to this effect, is not only an im- 
position on American dogs, but wiil be the needless 
foundation of needless difficulties, for the American 
Kennel Club, under whose national rules the show 
should be governed, are ample for the purpose, and to 
require this International registration only serves to 
show the ignorance on the subject that is father to 
the above quoted remarks. 

The show ought to be a representative one for all 
breeds, with a classification and prize list that would 
draw out the best in each breed, so that at future 
fair shows one could mark the progress of each breed 
as we do with a New York show, only a show like this 
should be more national in scope. This part of the 
great fair ought to be put in the hands of some prac- 
tical manager, with sense enough to be diplomatically 
mindful of the international and world wide auspices 
under which he labors. But the American Kennel 
Club ihould have jurisprudence over the undertaking 
so far as the rules go. Next thing we presume we 
shall hear of the Jury list that will make the awards, 
In the same manner thai the manufactures are 
passed upon! But what's the good of kicking? If 
there are a thousand entries of dogs, and each dog 
has to be registered in the A. K. C , our worthy 
secretary will wear the smile that won't evaporate, 
and in his mind's eye will rise up that cherished plan 
of an abode up town where the weary will be at rest 
and the rent man cease from troubling." 



Northern Show Notes. 



If Johnnie Jones has seven dogs, 

And every dog Is white; 
And fourteen cats came chasing round. 

Each one as black as night; 
And each two cats have eighteen lives, 

Less three destroyed by rats, 
How many lives must three dogs take 

Before they kill eight eats:- 



Under the caption "Kennel Clubs Disagree" the 
situation on the northern circuit is commented upon 
as follows by the Portland Oregonian: 

The six leading kennel clubs of the Pacific Coast 
havecrossed their wireson dates for the approaching 
bench shows, and, unless the clubs at the northern 
end of the circuit consent to hold their shows after 
San Francisco, Portland, Seattle and Tacoma, the 
Portland and San Francisco shows will be held at *he 
eame time that the Tacoma and Seattle shows are 
being held. This will mean that San Francisco and 
Portland will be in a circuit by themselves while the 
British Columbia and Sound cities will be alone and 
no Oregon dogs will show in the North, while few 
northern dogs will be benched at the San Francisco 
and Portland shows. 

President James A. Taylor of the Portland Kennel 
Club has received a letter from E. F. Willis, vice- 
president of the local club, who is now in Seattle, 
stating that the Vancouver Kennel Club wishes to 
open the circuit on March 31st, the show to close on 
Saturday, April 2d. Victoria wants the week follow- 
ing Vancouver, ending April 9th; Seattle the next 
week ending April Kith, and Tacoma the week ending 
April 23d. 

This arrangement would suit Portland very well, 
were it not for the fact that the San Francisco show 
is scheduled for April 18 to 10, inclusive, the only 
time that the 'Frisco club can secure the Mechanics' 
Pavilion, the only available place to hold the show. 
San Francisco and Portland have secured the services 
of James Mortimer, of New York City, to judge the 
'Frisco and Portland shows, the Portland show to 
follow that in the South, and, unless the Northern 
clubs agree to hold their shows after those of 'Frisco 
and Portland they will be entirely cut out of the 
circuit. 

Who would be the losers by this is a matter of 
opinion. There is no doubt that many of the British 
Columbia dogs would come to Portland and to San 
Francisco, which would mean a great loss to Seattle 
and Tacoma, None of the Portland or San Francisco 
dogs could go North, as they would miss the shows 
held in their own cities, and the fact must be 
recognized that the dogs from this end of the circuit 
have always been a stroug point in the Northern 
shows. 

The officers of the Portland Kennel Club, as well 
as the many fanciers who are following the matter, 
fail to see why it would not be a great advantage to 
the other clubs to follow up the San Francisco and 
Portland shows, since it would mean many more fine 
dogs on the Northern benches, and they would 
prosper by the later dates on occount of the more 
settled state of the weather. 

Grant Scott departed recently for Seattle, where 
he will meet E F. Willis, who, with Mr. Scott, was 
appointed by President Taylor to represent the local 
club at the meeting to be held in Seattle of delegates 
of all the clubs of the Pacific Kennel League, which 
consists of Vancouver and Victoria, B C, Seattle, 
Tacoma, Portland, San Francisco, Salem and Sacra- 
mento. The two latter clubs, however, will not be 
represented at tho meeting, since the Salem Club is a 
new organization and will abide by the decision of the 
other clubs in the circuit, while Sacramento has been 
recently organized and has never held a show. 

The circuit schedule will be discussed, as well as 
the much agitated question of affiliating with the 
American Kennel Club. A new constitution and by 
laws for the Pacific Kennel League will be drawn up 
and much other business of importance will be trans- 
acted. 

It is not expected that the question of joining the 
American Kennel Club will be definitely decided at 
this meeting, but a committee will in all probability 
be appointed to thresh the matter out with the A. K. 
C. Heretofore, the A. K. C. has refused to make any 
concessions to the P. K. L. clubs, and, unless a reason- 
able offer is made, the Pacific Kennel League will 
remain the governing organization of the Coast 
circuit. 

The value of the American Kennel Club studbook 
is appreciated by the clubs in the P. K. L. circuit, 
and this has been the source of practically all the 
disagreement. The American Field studbook is 
recognized to be the equal of the A. K. C. book as 
far as it has been opened for entries, but many of the 
toy and pet classes are not included. Should this be 
promised in the near future, there is no doubt that 
the Pacific Kennel League would adopt the Field 
book. 

It has been repeatedly demonstrated that shows 
can be successfully held under rules other than those 
of A. K. C. makiog. The Pacific Kennel Leaeue, as 
well as all the clubs, is in a thriving condition. Two 
new clubs have been added to the list during the past 
year, Salem having been granted admission and 
having held a successful show, while Sacramento has 
applied for membership. Tacoma enthusiasts are 
reorganizing the club in that city and greatly im- 
proved shows may be looked for at the Northern 
end of the circuit this year, in case an agreement can 
be reached in regard to dates. 



A successful one night show was held by the 
Victoria Kennel Club on Thursday evening, January 
28th at Victoria, B. C. Dr. G. L. Milnejudged Cockers 
Mr. Wm. Hodgson passed on the var'ous terrier 
breeds and Mr. F. Turner placed the ribbrns for 
Collies, St. Bernards and the miscellaneous class. 

The winners of silver medals were: 

C. A. Goodwin, for beBt Cocker Spaniel, won by the 
black Cocker Little Dorrit. 

Mr. J. J. Bostock, for best Fox Terrier, won by 
Remson. 

J. Mcintosh, for best Collie, won by Prince. 

Miss E. Turner, for best in miscellaneous terriers, 
won by Bedlington Terrier Dave. 

S. Creech, for best in open miscellaneous class, won 
by Irish Setter Nellie. 

R. E. Hanson, for best Irish Terrier, won by Nailer. 

R. Tubb, for beBt St. Bernard, won by Beauty. 

The regular awards in the various breeds and 
classes were: 

COCKER SPANIELS (Black)— Puppy dogs— 1 Dr. 
A. J. Garesche's Jack; 2 Mrs. J. W. Creighton's 
Jesmond Rollo; 3 Miss H.Clifford's Pat. Open dogs— 

1 Dr. A. J. Garesche's Jack; 2 J. W. Creighton's 
Jesmond Eclipse; 3 Dr. Hannington's Waver. Puppy 
bitches— 1 Mr. McEnnery'